Date   

Re: Popping sound

Carl Fuller
 

Check the adjustment on the height of your "extension table". Usually one of the "magnetic holders is catching on the edge somewhere... I'd suspect the outer edge on the left. anyway, give the legs on the end a couple of half turns and see if that doesn't eliminate your popping. I'm thinking the popping is the plastic from the magnetic holder hitting the edge of the machine or extension table.
--
"The arrogance of officialdom should be tempered and controlled, and assistance to foreign hands should be curtailed, lest Rome fall." Cicero - 55 BC Fathom the Hypocrisy of a Government that requires every citizen to prove they are insured... but not everyone must prove they are a citizen.


Re: Popping sound

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

Assuming that the sound is coming from the embroidery unit, I would guess there is some debris caught in the belt that moves the hoop horizontally. There are teeth on this belt, and a wad of lint could cause the belt to jump when that lint hits the drive gear. The best course would be to have them take the cover off the embroidery unit and check the belt for debris. At the same time the could make sure that it moves smoothly.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "malehto" <maalleh@...> wrote:

My MC12000 has recently begun making popping sounds when embroidering.
I am making the Hoopsisters mystery quilt using the SQ23 hoop. Each time the machine crosses a certain point on the horizontal axis it makes a popping sound. Stitches seem to be fine. No popping sounds on the vertical axis yet. My dealer said not to worry about, but it still concerns me. Am I harming my machine by ignoring this warning sound? What could be causing it? TIA.
Mary in Savannah, TX


Popping sound

malehto
 

My MC12000 has recently begun making popping sounds when embroidering.
I am making the Hoopsisters mystery quilt using the SQ23 hoop. Each time the machine crosses a certain point on the horizontal axis it makes a popping sound. Stitches seem to be fine. No popping sounds on the vertical axis yet. My dealer said not to worry about, but it still concerns me. Am I harming my machine by ignoring this warning sound? What could be causing it? TIA.
Mary in Savannah, TX


Re: machine so hot the white plastic in the bottom of the bobbin case melted!

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

A lot of it has to do with how the machine works. That little gouged out bit on the back of a needle, called the scarf, is where the hook passes to grab the thread and make a stitch. It is VERY close to the needle when it does this. If something pulls the needle just a tiny bit to the back it can hit the hook, or more often, the hook race itself. The needle breaks. No buggy, just put in a new needle. Except that there is a pit in the hook race where it hit. Most people never give it a second thought until the trouble starts.

I once sold a 6500 to a quilter who was learning to free motion quilt. She came back several times complaining about her "lemon" machine. Each time the hook race was damaged from a needle strike, probably because she was moving the fabric while the needle was in it. I polished the hook 3 or 4 times, then replaced the hook race at my expense. Shortly after that it came in again. She had been in a class and her machine was breaking the thread constantly while all the other brands were fine - an obvious lemon. I threw in the towel and gave her back her money. The hook race looked like a cheese grater. I replaced it and sold it as a used machine. The new owner loved it and never had a single problem with this "lemon".

The hook is second only to the needle in the importance of making a stitch. Early machines with oscillating hooks sustained as much or more damage as our modern rotary machines. The difference is that the oscillating hooks are easily removed and polished, and cheap to replace if it comes to that. The rotary hook system requires a thin edge for proper operation. Because the bobbin case is help in place by a magnet, the hook race must be made of very soft aluminum. Needle strikes cause far more damage to them.

There's no need to sew in fear because of this. While take-up lever escapes make a lot of noise, they don't normally cause damage if you stop and fix it. (High school kids NEVER stop after threading wrong - they destroy an enormous number of hook races!) The big damage happens when the thread gets caught during a long embroidery, pulling the needle into the hook. Or sewing with the wrong settings, pushing, pulling or other atrocities. (I could always tell when a new customer had never sewn on a Janome before - one hand grabbing the fabric at the back of the machine, the other grabbing the front and pulling it through while sewing. This is a recipe for disaster and we had to retrain a lot of people who had sewn most of their lives on cheap Walmart machines.

It's easy to check for hook damage. Take an old stocking or pantyhose and wipe it around the hook race with the bobbin case removed. If it snags, you've got a burr. If the machine makes a horrible loud squawking noise while sewing, you've got a burr. If the thread keeps breaking, you make have a burr that is cutting it. Usually you can see the burr with a magnifying glass. A good mechanic can polish out the small ones, but sometimes a new hook race is required. I did replacements for $100, which basically covered the parts, with the labor being free. That's one of the reasons we did not retire rich!

Hook damage can seem like the thread came out of the take-up lever if the stitch gets caught in a notch on the hook race and does not release. In 3 or 4 stitches of this you will get wads of thread on the bottom, lots of clunking, and maybe even the bobbin case popping up and spinning. If this happens, open the door and check the take-up. If it's still threaded, you may have hook race trouble.

Topstitch needles have a larger eye, but this should not change the sound much. If your needle is making a popping sound, it's dull and should be replaced.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "gbmko" <gbmko@...> wrote:

Dear Jim,
As expensive as these machines are, I guess I want to ask, why is it very easy to get a burr on the hook race? How do we check? Is it always a needle strike, and subsequent needle break that causes it? I get frustrated when I know I've threaded the machine properly, and am sewing along, and the thread somehow, randomly, pops out of the take up lever, and I get that clunky, grinding noise, and thread mess...even if it is just a few stitches...and then have to wonder, did I do that damage so many have written about? And how can I prevent the thread from popping out? Could this be caused by a burr? I've been sewing for 40+ years without this happening, so can't imagine I'm suddenly doing something wrong!?

Do topstitch needles normally sound more clunky than a sharp? I hear a definite difference when I have a topstitch needle in, (like it might be hitting something, but the point feels fine, and stitch quality is good )so was wondering if that was normal.

Thanks! I don't want to be nervous while I'm sewing, afraid I'm going to damage something. I've already ruined the plastic 1/4 inch foot forgetting it doesn't have a 9 mm wide opening on it... at least with my Bernina, and it's all metal feet, I just would break a needle, not the foot!

I need to get my machine in for a sensor check (getting a straight stitching needle plate is set. Please make sure the proper presser foot is attached...when I have my straight stitch foot on the dual feed. Message comes up, and machine stops after 15 seconds of sewing...continuously. ) so I guess I'll have it checked for burrs, too, just in case! Barbara Jean

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Jim_Stutsman" <jim@> wrote:

I've seen this once, although there was no melted plastic. The hook race, which the bobbin case sits in, had a burr on it from a needle strike. With each rotation a tiny amount of dust was "filed" off the bobbin case by the burr. The dust was very fine, and gradually made more and more friction. Eventually the bobbin case got hot enough to expand so much that the hook could no longer turn and the machine stopped.

I've serviced MANY machines with burrs on the hook race. It's very easy to do and most people never notice. In severe cases like yours, it can lead to bigger problems. In other cases all that fine dust and friction will cause the machine to squawk very loudly. A drop of oil silences it for a short while, leading people to think that it's a lubrication problem, and the real cause never gets fixed. About 80% of the time the burr can be carefully polished out, but in the other cases a new hook race is needed. It's a medium difficult repair for an experienced tech.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "lynschieber" <merijschieber@> wrote:

Has anyone else experienced this? I was happily embroidering Saturday when the machine suddenly started making ugly stitches and sounding funny. I stopped it immediately and removed the hoop thinking the bobbin must have a problem. The plate was so hot I had to use a cloth to remove it and the bobbin was hot. I got the bobbin out and realized the white plastic ring at the bottom of the bobbin case had melted! I took the machine to my dealer yesterday and he said he had never seen this happen and did not know what caused it. I am waiting to hear from him. This was a design I have sewn many times and I was running the machine at app 70%, not at the highest speed. The stabilizer was badge master and I was using the Janome blue needle.


Re: machine so hot the white plastic in the bottom of the bobbin case melted!

gbmko
 

Dear Jim,
As expensive as these machines are, I guess I want to ask, why is it very easy to get a burr on the hook race? How do we check? Is it always a needle strike, and subsequent needle break that causes it? I get frustrated when I know I've threaded the machine properly, and am sewing along, and the thread somehow, randomly, pops out of the take up lever, and I get that clunky, grinding noise, and thread mess...even if it is just a few stitches...and then have to wonder, did I do that damage so many have written about? And how can I prevent the thread from popping out? Could this be caused by a burr? I've been sewing for 40+ years without this happening, so can't imagine I'm suddenly doing something wrong!?

Do topstitch needles normally sound more clunky than a sharp? I hear a definite difference when I have a topstitch needle in, (like it might be hitting something, but the point feels fine, and stitch quality is good )so was wondering if that was normal.

Thanks! I don't want to be nervous while I'm sewing, afraid I'm going to damage something. I've already ruined the plastic 1/4 inch foot forgetting it doesn't have a 9 mm wide opening on it... at least with my Bernina, and it's all metal feet, I just would break a needle, not the foot!

I need to get my machine in for a sensor check (getting a straight stitching needle plate is set. Please make sure the proper presser foot is attached...when I have my straight stitch foot on the dual feed. Message comes up, and machine stops after 15 seconds of sewing...continuously. ) so I guess I'll have it checked for burrs, too, just in case! Barbara Jean

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Jim_Stutsman" <jim@...> wrote:

I've seen this once, although there was no melted plastic. The hook race, which the bobbin case sits in, had a burr on it from a needle strike. With each rotation a tiny amount of dust was "filed" off the bobbin case by the burr. The dust was very fine, and gradually made more and more friction. Eventually the bobbin case got hot enough to expand so much that the hook could no longer turn and the machine stopped.

I've serviced MANY machines with burrs on the hook race. It's very easy to do and most people never notice. In severe cases like yours, it can lead to bigger problems. In other cases all that fine dust and friction will cause the machine to squawk very loudly. A drop of oil silences it for a short while, leading people to think that it's a lubrication problem, and the real cause never gets fixed. About 80% of the time the burr can be carefully polished out, but in the other cases a new hook race is needed. It's a medium difficult repair for an experienced tech.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "lynschieber" <merijschieber@> wrote:

Has anyone else experienced this? I was happily embroidering Saturday when the machine suddenly started making ugly stitches and sounding funny. I stopped it immediately and removed the hoop thinking the bobbin must have a problem. The plate was so hot I had to use a cloth to remove it and the bobbin was hot. I got the bobbin out and realized the white plastic ring at the bottom of the bobbin case had melted! I took the machine to my dealer yesterday and he said he had never seen this happen and did not know what caused it. I am waiting to hear from him. This was a design I have sewn many times and I was running the machine at app 70%, not at the highest speed. The stabilizer was badge master and I was using the Janome blue needle.


Re: New user "how to" instruction needed

kmurphy1@bellsouth.net
 

Thank you very much, I will try this.

Sent from my iPad

On Aug 14, 2013, at 4:26 PM, "dbrhlngls" <dbrhlngls@...> wrote:

 

Welcome Kathy. It's very easy. This is what I do. I find the company/file I want to purchase and once it is purchased it gives you the option to download it (make sure you purchase .jef). I save it to my desktop so I can find it quickly. If it is a winzip file then you need to extract it. I then transfer it to first my master embroidery file folder by copying it and then move it to the USB (in the EMBf folder)next. Voila it is ready for you to use

Debbie
--- In janome12000@..., Kathy Murphy wrote:
>
> New janome 12000 user, need detailed instructions from start to finish purchasing embroidery designs on my computer and saving in emb/embf file.
> Is there a tutorial on Utube or cd I can order?
> Thank you,
> Kathy Murphy
> Kmurphy1@...
>
> Sent from my iPad
>


Re: New user "how to" instruction needed

dbrhlngls <dbrhlngls@...>
 

Welcome Kathy. It's very easy. This is what I do. I find the company/file I want to purchase and once it is purchased it gives you the option to download it (make sure you purchase .jef). I save it to my desktop so I can find it quickly. If it is a winzip file then you need to extract it. I then transfer it to first my master embroidery file folder by copying it and then move it to the USB (in the EMBf folder)next. Voila it is ready for you to use

Debbie

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, Kathy Murphy <kmurphy1@...> wrote:

New janome 12000 user, need detailed instructions from start to finish purchasing embroidery designs on my computer and saving in emb/embf file.
Is there a tutorial on Utube or cd I can order?
Thank you,
Kathy Murphy
Kmurphy1@...

Sent from my iPad


MC 15000

annscottca
 

Found a new website. http://janome15000.com/ I signed up for notifacation


Re: machine so hot the white plastic in the bottom of the bobbin case melted!

lynschieber <merijschieber@...>
 

Thank you!

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Jim_Stutsman" <jim@...> wrote:

I've seen this once, although there was no melted plastic. The hook race, which the bobbin case sits in, had a burr on it from a needle strike. With each rotation a tiny amount of dust was "filed" off the bobbin case by the burr. The dust was very fine, and gradually made more and more friction. Eventually the bobbin case got hot enough to expand so much that the hook could no longer turn and the machine stopped.

I've serviced MANY machines with burrs on the hook race. It's very easy to do and most people never notice. In severe cases like yours, it can lead to bigger problems. In other cases all that fine dust and friction will cause the machine to squawk very loudly. A drop of oil silences it for a short while, leading people to think that it's a lubrication problem, and the real cause never gets fixed. About 80% of the time the burr can be carefully polished out, but in the other cases a new hook race is needed. It's a medium difficult repair for an experienced tech.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "lynschieber" <merijschieber@> wrote:

Has anyone else experienced this? I was happily embroidering Saturday when the machine suddenly started making ugly stitches and sounding funny. I stopped it immediately and removed the hoop thinking the bobbin must have a problem. The plate was so hot I had to use a cloth to remove it and the bobbin was hot. I got the bobbin out and realized the white plastic ring at the bottom of the bobbin case had melted! I took the machine to my dealer yesterday and he said he had never seen this happen and did not know what caused it. I am waiting to hear from him. This was a design I have sewn many times and I was running the machine at app 70%, not at the highest speed. The stabilizer was badge master and I was using the Janome blue needle.


New user "how to" instruction needed

kmurphy1@bellsouth.net
 

New janome 12000 user, need detailed instructions from start to finish purchasing embroidery designs on my computer and saving in emb/embf file.
Is there a tutorial on Utube or cd I can order?
Thank you,
Kathy Murphy
Kmurphy1@bellsouth.net

Sent from my iPad


Re: machine so hot the white plastic in the bottom of the bobbin case melted!

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

I've seen this once, although there was no melted plastic. The hook race, which the bobbin case sits in, had a burr on it from a needle strike. With each rotation a tiny amount of dust was "filed" off the bobbin case by the burr. The dust was very fine, and gradually made more and more friction. Eventually the bobbin case got hot enough to expand so much that the hook could no longer turn and the machine stopped.

I've serviced MANY machines with burrs on the hook race. It's very easy to do and most people never notice. In severe cases like yours, it can lead to bigger problems. In other cases all that fine dust and friction will cause the machine to squawk very loudly. A drop of oil silences it for a short while, leading people to think that it's a lubrication problem, and the real cause never gets fixed. About 80% of the time the burr can be carefully polished out, but in the other cases a new hook race is needed. It's a medium difficult repair for an experienced tech.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "lynschieber" <merijschieber@...> wrote:

Has anyone else experienced this? I was happily embroidering Saturday when the machine suddenly started making ugly stitches and sounding funny. I stopped it immediately and removed the hoop thinking the bobbin must have a problem. The plate was so hot I had to use a cloth to remove it and the bobbin was hot. I got the bobbin out and realized the white plastic ring at the bottom of the bobbin case had melted! I took the machine to my dealer yesterday and he said he had never seen this happen and did not know what caused it. I am waiting to hear from him. This was a design I have sewn many times and I was running the machine at app 70%, not at the highest speed. The stabilizer was badge master and I was using the Janome blue needle.


machine so hot the white plastic in the bottom of the bobbin case melted!

lynschieber <merijschieber@...>
 

Has anyone else experienced this? I was happily embroidering Saturday when the machine suddenly started making ugly stitches and sounding funny. I stopped it immediately and removed the hoop thinking the bobbin must have a problem. The plate was so hot I had to use a cloth to remove it and the bobbin was hot. I got the bobbin out and realized the white plastic ring at the bottom of the bobbin case had melted! I took the machine to my dealer yesterday and he said he had never seen this happen and did not know what caused it. I am waiting to hear from him. This was a design I have sewn many times and I was running the machine at app 70%, not at the highest speed. The stabilizer was badge master and I was using the Janome blue needle.


Re: New 15000

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

Absolutely. The Top of Line machine has to do it all!

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, doherty4@... wrote:

So, I know what "assume" can do [;)] - but can we assume that the
15000 is a sewing-embroidery machine combo?!
Deb (Ky)
--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, Debbie wrote:

Also found this flyer that mentions it in last paragraph.
http://www.janomeflyer.com/horizon-sewing-machines/

Debbie


Re: Apple App Store

Diane Hiller <dhiller@...>
 

If this is true & a new Quilting/Embroidery machine is going to be introduced, I for one am very disappointed in Janome.  They are not catering to those that just want  a stand alone single needle embroidery machine capable of doing  larger pieces.   A lot of us would like a machine updated from the 350 but not wanting to go multi needle.  I for one refuse to pay these outlandish prices for a multifunctional machine.  Think I may have to look at Brother/Baby Lock for my next embroidery machine.  
Diane Hiller


Re: Embroidering

maggie cooper
 

I use a silicon lubricant spray SL50, and apply a thin spritz of it to the back of my stabiliser. It prevents gummed up needles or threads, helps the thread and needle to exit the stabiliser more smoothly and is far less expensive to use than the silicon impregnated stabilisers a well known range of stabilisers offers to the home embroiderer. It's extremely effective.
Maggie Cooper.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, Sandy <scs500k@...> wrote:

This may be a "no-no" by some peoples' standard, but I use a trace of vaseline rubbed on my needle as I had this issue with Floriani's Wet N Gone. Sandy in Dallas




Re: updating Dig MBX and dongle driver

maggie cooper
 

The V4.0q has a few small background repairs in it, which unless you've been one that has suffered from the minor mistakes, and you don't need the hoops etc for the 9900 you don't have to worry about. I have to say though I keep my program updated.
The dongle driver is usually effected by the last windows major update, so if you find MBX wont launch after an OS update, you need to download the current driver for your OS. There are times when the driver gets it's knickers in a twist and downloading the correct driver for your OS will cure that. I also keep my dongle driver updated as well.

When Janome/Wilcom upload a new update they include the most current drivers, but they aren't ''seers'' so can't release drivers for new OS updates, we have to do that, and not just for Janome software and dongle, but our graphic display cards, printers, mouse, sound cards, Windows doesn't supply them.
Maggie Cooper.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "suerevere@..." <srevere@...> wrote:

Do you feel there is any need to update my Digitizer MBX from V4.0M R2 2 August 2012 (171-6896) to the 4.0Q if I am not using MC9900 nor using Win 8?

Dongle driver -- I can't remember when I've updated it last. I do not want to install or re-install over it if it's the most current. How can you tell which driver version you are running? Is it tied to the Digitizer version or is it a separate item?

Thanks,
Sue R


Re: New 15000

Richard and Debra
 

So, I know what "assume" can do  - but can we assume that the 15000 is a sewing-embroidery machine combo?!

Deb (Ky)

--- In janome12000@..., Debbie wrote:
>
> Also found this flyer that mentions it in last paragraph.
> http://www.janomeflyer.com/horizon-sewing-machines/
>
> Debbie
>


Re: updating Dig MBX and dongle driver

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

It's generally best to keep your Digitizer updated to the latest version. Janome doesn't always list everything in an update, so even though it suggests you only need it for the 9900 there is a possibility of it containing fixes for bugs you haven't seen. It shouldn't take more than 15 minutes or so, well worth the effort.

The dongle driver version can be determined from the Device Manager screen, which is an option on Control Panel. From there you can click on the HASP device and see the driver details. As long as the dongle driver isn't causing you problems, there's no compelling need to update it. If things get wonky, that would be a good place to start, but I don't think you need to update it just for the sake of updating.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "suerevere@..." <srevere@...> wrote:

Do you feel there is any need to update my Digitizer MBX from V4.0M R2 2 August 2012 (171-6896) to the 4.0Q if I am not using MC9900 nor using Win 8?

Dongle driver -- I can't remember when I've updated it last. I do not want to install or re-install over it if it's the most current. How can you tell which driver version you are running? Is it tied to the Digitizer version or is it a separate item?

Thanks,
Sue R


updating Dig MBX and dongle driver

suerevere@ymail.com
 

Do you feel there is any need to update my Digitizer MBX from V4.0M R2 2 August 2012 (171-6896) to the 4.0Q if I am not using MC9900 nor using Win 8?

Dongle driver -- I can't remember when I've updated it last. I do not want to install or re-install over it if it's the most current. How can you tell which driver version you are running? Is it tied to the Digitizer version or is it a separate item?

Thanks,
Sue R


Re: Removing Digitizer MB

edw9192003@...
 

Sorry Cheryl that I wasn't clear. I am selling my old program
and installing a new program, not an update.
Thanks,
Margaret

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Cheryl" <capaul@...> wrote:

Margaret,

You didn't say if you were upgrading to Digitizer MBX. If you are upgrading to Digitizer MBX, your old dongles will be made useless as they are needed for you to get a newer version. If you are just selling the program and not doing anything about an upgrade, your dongle from Digitizer MB will work fine for the person you sell to.

Cheryl - Saskatoon