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Re: 15000

Linda Thompson
 

Sewing Rose, you got a torch?  ?  ?     There is no rhyme nor reason to the why of  my thread jumps out.  


Re: 500E—Embroidery on a hoodie

Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...>
 

Do you know how to float the hoodie using a temporary adhesive and then baste it in the hoop? That will keep the hoodie securely in the hoop. Keep the rest of the hoodie supported so that the weight of it doesn't pull on the hoop.
Kathy

On Wednesday, December 22, 2021, 09:38:25 AM CST, Roberta K via groups.io <robkon94@...> wrote:


I need to embroider a design on the left chest of a hoodie to give my granddaughter, using my 500E. The hoodie is fairly bulky. It is sweatshirt fabric on the outside with high pile fleece on the inside. I have no idea how to get it to stay in a hoop. I know I cannot hoop the hoodie. I want to use no show mesh to stabilize, but I think the hoodie would pull it out of the hoop.

I don’t own any hoops except the ones that came with the machine. Any suggestions are welcome. Please help! This is a holiday gift!

Thanks, 
Roberta in FL


500E—Embroidery on a hoodie

Roberta K
 

I need to embroider a design on the left chest of a hoodie to give my granddaughter, using my 500E. The hoodie is fairly bulky. It is sweatshirt fabric on the outside with high pile fleece on the inside. I have no idea how to get it to stay in a hoop. I know I cannot hoop the hoodie. I want to use no show mesh to stabilize, but I think the hoodie would pull it out of the hoop.

I don’t own any hoops except the ones that came with the machine. Any suggestions are welcome. Please help! This is a holiday gift!

Thanks, 
Roberta in FL


Re: 15000

Lyn Quine
 

I’ve had this with my 15000 for about a year now, I took it for a service earlier this year, and mentioned it to the tech, he said the spring was there and not damaged, he has moved the arm slightly, I know this because before the service, I could do the alternate threading without opening the side door, now after the service, I have to open it.  If I don’t use the alternative threading it will jump out even now after the service.




On 21 Dec 2021, at 22:26, SewingRose <newbuild2012@...> wrote:

Can't remember which one of my machines started with the thread jumping out of the takeup lever, threaded in the opposite direction, changed threads etc...even flossed the whole thread path and still nothing.  Got a torch and there was lint buildup from the thread caught under the small clip spring that Jim has shown above.  Flossed (sideways) through there and it never happened again.

Might be worth a try as it can be frustrating, hope you can get it sorted asap.


Re: 15000

SewingRose
 

Can't remember which one of my machines started with the thread jumping out of the takeup lever, threaded in the opposite direction, changed threads etc...even flossed the whole thread path and still nothing.  Got a torch and there was lint buildup from the thread caught under the small clip spring that Jim has shown above.  Flossed (sideways) through there and it never happened again.

Might be worth a try as it can be frustrating, hope you can get it sorted asap.


Re: 15000

Sandra Wheeler
 

The spring is there, I can see it. It looks exactly the same as my 11000.  The check spring on the bottom is there and moves when it should.

This has happened with two different threads.  One was a metallic so that certainly could be a kink.  The thread I'm using now is Gutterman poly.  And I always thread from left to right so it crosses below the lever.  It used to come out all the time on my 6600 until I started threading left to right.  

This machine hasn't really been used that much. I bought it late Sept 2017. It spent most of 2020 locked up because of covid, I've only had it back about a year.  It shows 1406 h 14 m turned on, 101 h 19 m stitching.


On Tue, Dec 21, 2021 at 2:03 PM Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
There is a small spring clip in the take-up lever that keeps the thread from coming out. The red arrow in the photo points to the clip. Open the door on the machine and confirm that the clip is still there. It's rare for it not to be, but if it has somehow been removed a new take-up lever would be required. This would require the servicing dealer to order the part and perform a very involved repair to replace it. That means $$$.

Assuming that the clip is still there and closing all the way after threading, then the only other way for the thread to come out is for a loop to flip up over the take-up lever and snapping into the eyelet past the clip.This can happen if the check spring at the bottom of the tension assembly is stuck, broken, or out of adjustment. Its job is to keep the thread from going slack while the needle is coming up out of the fabric. If you open the door of the machine while threading, right after you make the U-turn you should see that spring move when you pull up on the thread.

There is only one other possibility that I can think of. Some threads tend to be on the wiry side, with a memory of how they were wound on the spool. They may have enough kink to loop over the take-up, causing the thread to escape. For that you can try threading a little differently. Usually you put the thread in the take-up eyelet by holding it in both hands and pulling down. The thread enters the eyelet on the right and exits on the left. Switch hands so that the thread enters from the left and exits from the right. This creates an X pattern and seems to help with this problem. Hope this helps!


Re: 15000

Sandra Wheeler
 

It's the spring on the take up lever.  I can't see it and I can slide the thread back and forth across the top of the lever, nothing catches it going backwards or forwards, in and out.  Now you can imagine me saying many, many unpublishable words.  This will be the third repair in 6 months, and the second very expensive one.


On Tue, Dec 21, 2021 at 2:03 PM Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
There is a small spring clip in the take-up lever that keeps the thread from coming out. The red arrow in the photo points to the clip. Open the door on the machine and confirm that the clip is still there. It's rare for it not to be, but if it has somehow been removed a new take-up lever would be required. This would require the servicing dealer to order the part and perform a very involved repair to replace it. That means $$$.

Assuming that the clip is still there and closing all the way after threading, then the only other way for the thread to come out is for a loop to flip up over the take-up lever and snapping into the eyelet past the clip.This can happen if the check spring at the bottom of the tension assembly is stuck, broken, or out of adjustment. Its job is to keep the thread from going slack while the needle is coming up out of the fabric. If you open the door of the machine while threading, right after you make the U-turn you should see that spring move when you pull up on the thread.

There is only one other possibility that I can think of. Some threads tend to be on the wiry side, with a memory of how they were wound on the spool. They may have enough kink to loop over the take-up, causing the thread to escape. For that you can try threading a little differently. Usually you put the thread in the take-up eyelet by holding it in both hands and pulling down. The thread enters the eyelet on the right and exits on the left. Switch hands so that the thread enters from the left and exits from the right. This creates an X pattern and seems to help with this problem. Hope this helps!


Re: 15000

Sandra Wheeler
 

I thread from left to right also and it was threaded left to right when it started coming out.


On Tue, Dec 21, 2021 at 1:45 PM Lyn Quine <lynquine@...> wrote:
That’s a common thing, I thread the lever from the left side, so the thread crosses, that seems to solve the problem.  It’s a tip from Diane.  It’s called the alternative threading I think.


On 21 Dec 2021, at 20:34, Sandra Wheeler <angelthings@...> wrote:

My 15000 has developed a new problem in the last few days.  The thread will randomly come out of the take up lever.  I'm very careful make sure it's seating in the lever completely but that doesn't seem to make any difference.


Re: 15000

Jim Stutsman
 

There is a small spring clip in the take-up lever that keeps the thread from coming out. The red arrow in the photo points to the clip. Open the door on the machine and confirm that the clip is still there. It's rare for it not to be, but if it has somehow been removed a new take-up lever would be required. This would require the servicing dealer to order the part and perform a very involved repair to replace it. That means $$$.

Assuming that the clip is still there and closing all the way after threading, then the only other way for the thread to come out is for a loop to flip up over the take-up lever and snapping into the eyelet past the clip.This can happen if the check spring at the bottom of the tension assembly is stuck, broken, or out of adjustment. Its job is to keep the thread from going slack while the needle is coming up out of the fabric. If you open the door of the machine while threading, right after you make the U-turn you should see that spring move when you pull up on the thread.

There is only one other possibility that I can think of. Some threads tend to be on the wiry side, with a memory of how they were wound on the spool. They may have enough kink to loop over the take-up, causing the thread to escape. For that you can try threading a little differently. Usually you put the thread in the take-up eyelet by holding it in both hands and pulling down. The thread enters the eyelet on the right and exits on the left. Switch hands so that the thread enters from the left and exits from the right. This creates an X pattern and seems to help with this problem. Hope this helps!


Re: 15000

favymtz
 

Also, I've noticed that some brands of thread seem to be more susceptible to this happening.
Maybe it's the more slippery threads, I think. Has anyone else made that connection?
--
Favymtz


Re: 15000

Lyn Quine
 

That’s a common thing, I thread the lever from the left side, so the thread crosses, that seems to solve the problem.  It’s a tip from Diane.  It’s called the alternative threading I think.


On 21 Dec 2021, at 20:34, Sandra Wheeler <angelthings@...> wrote:

My 15000 has developed a new problem in the last few days.  The thread will randomly come out of the take up lever.  I'm very careful make sure it's seating in the lever completely but that doesn't seem to make any difference.


15000

Sandra Wheeler
 

My 15000 has developed a new problem in the last few days.  The thread will randomly come out of the take up lever.  I'm very careful make sure it's seating in the lever completely but that doesn't seem to make any difference.


Re: Tension problems with Old MC9000

Leslie
 

Thank you for all of your help!  I’ll see how far I can take it from here. 

or maybe start a GoFundMe for a 550e (ha ha!)


Re: Tension problems with Old MC9000

Jim Stutsman
 

It's been at least 15 years since I last worked on a 9000, so my memory might not be reliable regarding the self-test. However you may be able to verify operation another way. Again, with top cover off, foot down, sew a stitch or two. Then adjust the tension from the touch screen, going up and down. You should see a "twitch" in the gear each time you do that. If it doesn't, then the stepper motor is not being triggered. That could be the motor itself, but usually it's a driver transistor that goes out. You are correct about parts availability being a problem. Janome does not have a very deep stock on parts, and it's usually only complete assemblies - like the entire tension unit instead of just the stepping motor. The best hope would be to find a used machine that may or may not be working. The tension is not a likely source of trouble on the 9000, so if you could buy a "parts donor" cheaply it would likely have what you need. You could also use the schematic to follow the logic for the stepper motor back to the driver transistor. Those are not socketed, but with just 3 pins to unsolder, it might be replaceable with a lot of hassle. And if you take it out, you could maybe test it to confirm it was the issue before getting a new one. The stepper motor itself plugs into the F board, which is a small board that handles the buttons on the front panel. I don't remember whether there are parts on that board, or if it's just a collection point to take all the buttons and the motor to a single cable back to the A board, which is the main one.


Re: Tension problems with Old MC9000

Leslie
 

I had previously done most of what you suggested—removed top cover, used a bright light to view between the disks, visually check for debris.
You stated “You'll see the tension adjusting gears move through their full rotation in the power-on self-test.”  During that power on test, those gears by the tension mechanism do not move. The needle and the embroidery carriage both move and seemingly do a self check. Does this indicate a hardware issue?

Any more ideas?  After finding the schematic for this machine, I’ve started looking for parts.  If in fact I need a tension unit, it isn’t obviously available. Are there any secret sources for parts or shops that you know of that have a large parts stash?


Re: Tension problems with Old MC9000

Jim Stutsman
 

Keep in mind that the tension is held open mechanically when the presser foot is up. With the top cover removed, put the foot down and turn the machine on. You'll see the tension adjusting gears move through their full rotation in the power-on self-test. It's very unlikely they have worn out, since the self-test runs them through the full range of motion. If they don't make it, you get an error. While you have that top cover off, notice the little cover on the top side with the dotted line showing the thread path. That cover is held on by a screw, which is removed from the bottom of the top cover. If you take it off you may find an accumulation of thread debris. Normally that will cause a dramatic increase in thread tension, not a decrease. Also, with top cover off and presser foot UP, shine a strong light over the tension discs. Use a long thin needle to probe between them. If something is stuck in there you should see it.


Re: Tension problems with Old MC9000

Leslie
 

Thanks for such a quick response.
I did as you suggested and was able to clear out some dust and lint. Unfortunately the tension disks still do not appear to be engaging. 

I am fairly confident that there is no debris as I have removed the top cover and have visibility to the top/back of the tension disks. When I lower the presser foot, the right disk moves towards the other, but definitely doesn’t engage. I’ve adjusted the tension screw and see that affects the spacing but not enough to provide any tension.   I see that the gears for this mechanism are plastic or nylon.  Is it likely that they have worn out?  Do you have any idea if these parts would still be available?

thanks again.


Re: Tension problems with Old MC9000

Jim Stutsman
 

It sounds like there may be debris lodged between the tension discs, so they cannot close properly. Take a strip of scrap fabric (Denim is especially good for this.), raise the presser foot, fold the scrap in half, and "floss" the tension with the folded edge. That will usually work out whatever is in there. Only once did I have to disassemble a machine to fix this problem. In that case the sticky "dot" from the label on the spool had ridden down the thread and attached it self to a disc. Good luck!


Tension problems with Old MC9000

Leslie
 

I have an old Memory Craft 9000 that has worked beautifully since the early 1990’s. I’ve recently replaced the sewing functionality with an M7 and planned to keep the 9000 for embroidery for a few more years. 

Unfortunately I am now experiencing tension problems. I’ve cleaned everything and replaced the needle but continue to have tension issues, especially after the machine has run for 5+ minutes and is getting warm.  It appears that the thread (top) tension disks are not properly engaging.  The thread pulls through the tension disks with the same effort regardless of whether the pressure foot is up or down (sewing mode or embroidery mode).

Does anyone have suggestions or tricks to get this back working (aside from hoping that the dealer can fix such an old machine)?  

Despite popular belief, the Scan-n-sew PC with Ver 2 of the software is compatible with Windows 10. All that is required is a simple Serial to USB cable and a windows setting to map the serial port.  I am easily able to put downloaded designs onto the 9000 memory card and would love to get this machine working again. 

Thanks in advance for any help or suggestions 


Re: STD Foot

Cynthia Dickerson
 

That must be the reason!!  Thank you Jim, the STD foot did work really great on my quilt.  I absolutely loved it, but will never do that again!
 

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