Date   

550e & 10000 issues

mah_jongg
 

1)   550e skips stitches randomly with basic embroidery stitches (have cleaned machine & changed out needles, use organ 75/11 sharp)?
2)  Randomly loops when doing satin stitching no matter what design I use.
3)  Whenever I stop the machine while embroidering (to clear something, adjust something, etc) the machine always loops a couple of stitches when it starts back up. Been doing this since I bought it.
4)  How do I fix the squishy bobbin winding on the 10000. Really noticeable when winding embroidery thread. See  #28408  from my prior post for bobbin winding issues. Both machines are going into the shop this week.  I will wait for the 550e to be fixed, while the 10000 will be left behind. 120 miles round trip.  Any and all help will be appreciated.

Thanks,
Mahjongg


Re: A Suggestion for managing projects

Clsoares78@...
 

I used that type of fabric and put grommets in it and hang from my fabric cabinet when I need a design wall. It works great.


Re: A Suggestion for managing projects

Kathy Skagen
 

That's genius! 

On Sunday, June 20, 2021, 03:42:26 PM CDT, Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:


Greetings, sewing friends----

This suggestion might be of special interest to quilters, but it could apply to any type of sewing projects. 

I was making a quilt with a somewhat complicated layout, but I knew I did not have time to piece the entire top in one session. Nor do I have a space large enough to leave the pieces laid out in order for the next session.  I usually use my kitchen island for laying out and cutting, but could not leave my fabrics there for days, for obvious reasons.   So, I used a large vinyl tablecloth with a fuzzy backing, which is described as "flannel", but it is not flannel by any stretch of the imagination.  I laid out my rows and columns to be pieced on the fuzzy side of the tablecloth, then pinned and sewed a couple of the columns before having to stop my project. The un-pinned, un-sewn pieces remained on the tablecloth, which I carefully folded into a manageable  size to place in my project basket. When I had the time to continue pinning and sewing, my pieces were already laid out in order, and all I had to do was to carefully unfold the tablecloth and work on my project. No wrinkles, all the pieces stayed put in the folded tablecloth.  You can get these tablecloths for just a few dollars at big box stores, or Goodwill, etc... and also you can use them as design "boards" if you attach to a wall with those removeable 3M hooks.  I stick a few of those hooks on the wall, and attach small Bulldog clips to the top edge of the tablecloth and hook the clips into the 3M hooks.  Your pieces will stick to the fuzzy side. A great, temporary design board.    Happy sewing to all!   Kathy Strabel    Camas WA


Re: A Suggestion for managing projects

wlstarn@aol.com
 

I've done this quite a bit.  You can roll it up, and unroll a row at a time to sew the pieces together.  Also a handy way to take a quilt in progress to a retreat or workshop.fold one edge in do that the fabric pieces are not sticking to the flannel on their right sides.


Re: A Suggestion for managing projects

ladybug35186
 

Thanks for your suggestions - I also took a piece of styrofoam (any size you want) and covered with flannel and placed on a wall to be used as a design wall.  Your idea would work much better since you can fold and put away (which you cannot do with foamboard). My design board may go away - I like your idea much better and wouldn't lose precious wall space.  Thanks again!!!

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...>
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Sent: Sun, Jun 20, 2021 10:45 am
Subject: [onlinesewing-janome] A Suggestion for managing projects

Greetings, sewing friends----

This suggestion might be of special interest to quilters, but it could apply to any type of sewing projects. 

I was making a quilt with a somewhat complicated layout, but I knew I did not have time to piece the entire top in one session. Nor do I have a space large enough to leave the pieces laid out in order for the next session.  I usually use my kitchen island for laying out and cutting, but could not leave my fabrics there for days, for obvious reasons.   So, I used a large vinyl tablecloth with a fuzzy backing, which is described as "flannel", but it is not flannel by any stretch of the imagination.  I laid out my rows and columns to be pieced on the fuzzy side of the tablecloth, then pinned and sewed a couple of the columns before having to stop my project. The un-pinned, un-sewn pieces remained on the tablecloth, which I carefully folded into a manageable  size to place in my project basket. When I had the time to continue pinning and sewing, my pieces were already laid out in order, and all I had to do was to carefully unfold the tablecloth and work on my project. No wrinkles, all the pieces stayed put in the folded tablecloth.  You can get these tablecloths for just a few dollars at big box stores, or Goodwill, etc... and also you can use them as design "boards" if you attach to a wall with those removeable 3M hooks.  I stick a few of those hooks on the wall, and attach small Bulldog clips to the top edge of the tablecloth and hook the clips into the 3M hooks.  Your pieces will stick to the fuzzy side. A great, temporary design board.    Happy sewing to all!   Kathy Strabel    Camas WA


Re: A Suggestion for managing projects

Janet Wallis
 

Good idea. Thanks for sharing.


On Sun, Jun 20, 2021 at 4:42 PM Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:
Greetings, sewing friends----

This suggestion might be of special interest to quilters, but it could apply to any type of sewing projects. 

I was making a quilt with a somewhat complicated layout, but I knew I did not have time to piece the entire top in one session. Nor do I have a space large enough to leave the pieces laid out in order for the next session.  I usually use my kitchen island for laying out and cutting, but could not leave my fabrics there for days, for obvious reasons.   So, I used a large vinyl tablecloth with a fuzzy backing, which is described as "flannel", but it is not flannel by any stretch of the imagination.  I laid out my rows and columns to be pieced on the fuzzy side of the tablecloth, then pinned and sewed a couple of the columns before having to stop my project. The un-pinned, un-sewn pieces remained on the tablecloth, which I carefully folded into a manageable  size to place in my project basket. When I had the time to continue pinning and sewing, my pieces were already laid out in order, and all I had to do was to carefully unfold the tablecloth and work on my project. No wrinkles, all the pieces stayed put in the folded tablecloth.  You can get these tablecloths for just a few dollars at big box stores, or Goodwill, etc... and also you can use them as design "boards" if you attach to a wall with those removeable 3M hooks.  I stick a few of those hooks on the wall, and attach small Bulldog clips to the top edge of the tablecloth and hook the clips into the 3M hooks.  Your pieces will stick to the fuzzy side. A great, temporary design board.    Happy sewing to all!   Kathy Strabel    Camas WA


Re: A Suggestion for managing projects

Cat - N
 

Kathy, I seriously thought you were going to say you rolled the tablecloth up with your pieces inside…lol…but folding it to fit a storage place is maybe better. I did a similar thing when I (a non-beginner) went to a beginner block of the month with a real beginner friend. I hated the thought of pressing the blocks only to have them wrinkle in transport, so I stacked them on several pieces of pre-used stabilizer that I had torn away the embroidery from, put a few more used sheets on top of the stack, rolled them up and put a tiny hair scunchies from a dollar store (I use them on Yorkie topknots…they cost about $2/300pc bag) on each end. They stayed perfect. But I like your idea for a encasing the layout in a table cloth for a larger quilt in process. Thank you. 

- Cat

Typos courtesy of autocorrect. 


A Suggestion for managing projects

Kathy Strabel
 

Greetings, sewing friends----

This suggestion might be of special interest to quilters, but it could apply to any type of sewing projects. 

I was making a quilt with a somewhat complicated layout, but I knew I did not have time to piece the entire top in one session. Nor do I have a space large enough to leave the pieces laid out in order for the next session.  I usually use my kitchen island for laying out and cutting, but could not leave my fabrics there for days, for obvious reasons.   So, I used a large vinyl tablecloth with a fuzzy backing, which is described as "flannel", but it is not flannel by any stretch of the imagination.  I laid out my rows and columns to be pieced on the fuzzy side of the tablecloth, then pinned and sewed a couple of the columns before having to stop my project. The un-pinned, un-sewn pieces remained on the tablecloth, which I carefully folded into a manageable  size to place in my project basket. When I had the time to continue pinning and sewing, my pieces were already laid out in order, and all I had to do was to carefully unfold the tablecloth and work on my project. No wrinkles, all the pieces stayed put in the folded tablecloth.  You can get these tablecloths for just a few dollars at big box stores, or Goodwill, etc... and also you can use them as design "boards" if you attach to a wall with those removeable 3M hooks.  I stick a few of those hooks on the wall, and attach small Bulldog clips to the top edge of the tablecloth and hook the clips into the 3M hooks.  Your pieces will stick to the fuzzy side. A great, temporary design board.    Happy sewing to all!   Kathy Strabel    Camas WA


Re: Updating to Windows 10

Jim Stutsman
 

You'll have to reinstall your machine software after updating to 10. You'll need the original CDs to do this. Here's what I would suggest:
  1. Make a full backup of EVERYTHING to an external disk drive. If you don't have one, you can get a USB drive for around $100. If your computer does not have USB 3 (which is likely if it came with Windows 7 or earlier) you'll want to do this overnight. USB 2 is slow. If you don't have backup software, I recommend this.
  2. Once you have upgraded, open the Windows Update manager and get any updates that you don't have. Depending on how old your Windows 10 installer is, there will be a lot. Patches for Windows vulnerabilities come out every Tuesday. This could take a while, have something to read or a TV to watch while you wait.
  3. Now you can install your Janome software. Since the CD version is old, you'll need to download and install updates. For Horizon Suite get this. Customizer 11000 needs this.
At this point you should be ready to go. However, unless Janome had a change of heart, the 11000 will no longer connect to your computer via USB cable. The driver needed for that only works on 32 bit Windows, and they did not (that I know of) update it for 64 bit. You will still be able to move designs via USB Flash Drive though. Depending on the age and capabilities of your computer, it may be slow. Increasing RAM and replacing the hard drive with SSD may help, but the cost to do that may approach the cost of a new computer. So before you start you may want to look at that. Having 8GB or less of RAM could be a problem, and a hard drive that is 3 or more years old is just about at end of life anyway. Of course you may be planning on a new computer as a means of updating. I recommend 16GB or more of RAM. The "hard drive" should be SSD (Solid State Drive). This adds a bit to the price, but is worth it for the speed. SSD lasts longer than a spinning "platter" hard drive, but they eventually wear out. Each memory cell has a maximum number of times it can be written before it quits working. This wear is spread out over the entire drive, so buying more storage than you need will also extend the life of the drive. <Begin cynicism> Of course like everything else that is sold today, computers have become disposable, so there's no advantage in buying the top of the line. The tech continues to evolve, and at some point our grandchildren will be forced to contend with gigantic mounds of e-waste from all the old, dead computers. <End cynicism>


Updating to Windows 10

cnystul in Mn.
 

I'm going to be updating to Windows 10. I'm wondering with my software for my 12000 and 11000 will I be having problems with them installing on my computer? Is there anything I should be doing in advance? Thank you! Cathy


Re: Installing Skyline S9 machine update.

Kathleen Chevalier
 

I got the update installed OK. Thank you, Cat, for your help.

On Thu 6/17/2021 12:28 PM, Kathleen Chevalier wrote:
I found it and have saved the .pdf with the instructions. I inserted the USB into the machine and turned it on while holding down the needle up-down and lock stitch buttons. I got a yellow screen with ERROR. I'm reformatting the USB, which is 2 GB, and will try again. Thanks anyway.

On Thu 6/17/2021 12:08 PM, Kathleen Chevalier wrote:

I am finally getting around to update my light blue Skyline S9. I followed the instructions so I have a USB stick with the extracted files on it. I put the USB stick into the machine and turned it on. It just goes into sewing mode. The instructions say to start the S9 in "Update Mode" but I can't find any directions to do that. Help will be appreciated.


--
Kathleen Chevalier
western Pennsylvania

--
Kathleen Chevalier
western Pennsylvania


Re: Installing Skyline S9 machine update.

Cat - N
 

I was pretty sure the instruction was in the zipped file set that your downloaded...like with my 11000...that says to put the USB in the machine with the POWER OFF, then, for the S9:

Press and hold the Lock Stitch button and the Needle Up/Down button at the same time and turn the power switch ON.
Hold the buttons down for at least 3 seconds until the LCD screen turns yellow.

- Cat


-----Original Message-----
From: Kathleen Chevalier <kathleensews@...>
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Sent: Thu, Jun 17, 2021 12:08 pm
Subject: [onlinesewing-janome] Installing Skyline S9 machine update.

I am finally getting around to update my light blue Skyline S9. I followed the instructions so I have a USB stick with the extracted files on it. I put the USB stick into the machine and turned it on. It just goes into sewing mode. The instructions say to start the S9 in "Update Mode" but I can't find any directions to do that. Help will be appreciated.


Re: Installing Skyline S9 machine update.

Kathleen Chevalier
 

I found it and have saved the .pdf with the instructions. I inserted the USB into the machine and turned it on while holding down the needle up-down and lock stitch buttons. I got a yellow screen with ERROR. I'm reformatting the USB, which is 2 GB, and will try again. Thanks anyway.

On Thu 6/17/2021 12:08 PM, Kathleen Chevalier wrote:

I am finally getting around to update my light blue Skyline S9. I followed the instructions so I have a USB stick with the extracted files on it. I put the USB stick into the machine and turned it on. It just goes into sewing mode. The instructions say to start the S9 in "Update Mode" but I can't find any directions to do that. Help will be appreciated.


--
Kathleen Chevalier
western Pennsylvania


Installing Skyline S9 machine update.

Kathleen Chevalier
 

I am finally getting around to update my light blue Skyline S9. I followed the instructions so I have a USB stick with the extracted files on it. I put the USB stick into the machine and turned it on. It just goes into sewing mode. The instructions say to start the S9 in "Update Mode" but I can't find any directions to do that. Help will be appreciated.


Re: Can't get the needle bar to move

Kathy Skagen
 

Sounds amazing for quilters!

On Tuesday, June 15, 2021, 02:11:14 PM CDT, Cat - N via groups.io <navillusc@...> wrote:


A Tin Lizzie 18 is a long arm quilter with an 18” throat. The 15000 has 11” to the right of the needle but the throat on a long arm is to the back of the machine. A long arm moves over a quilt on a frame. The quilt moves under the needle on the 15000. We have a stool nearby, but use it for resting and watching the robot quilt…not for free or ruler quilting. 

- Cat

Typos courtesy of autocorrect. 



On Jun 15, 2021 at 12:15 PM, <Kathy Skagen> wrote:

I have never seen a Tin Lizzie but would a chair that has an adjustable seat that can be raised help? I'm 5'3 and that helps me with my regular sewing machines.

On Tuesday, June 15, 2021, 10:55:53 AM CDT, Sally Silvers <salsewsart@...> wrote:


My machine is  Tin Lizzie 18, too.  It has served me well with light use (life gets in the way) and even surviving a move.  My one complaint is that I can't see where I'm going when I stitch backwards.  I'm short, only about 5' and think maybe if Lizzie were lower, I'd see better.  Any suggestions would be welcome.


Re: Can't get the needle bar to move

Cat - N
 

A Tin Lizzie 18 is a long arm quilter with an 18” throat. The 15000 has 11” to the right of the needle but the throat on a long arm is to the back of the machine. A long arm moves over a quilt on a frame. The quilt moves under the needle on the 15000. We have a stool nearby, but use it for resting and watching the robot quilt…not for free or ruler quilting. 

- Cat

Typos courtesy of autocorrect. 



On Jun 15, 2021 at 12:15 PM, <Kathy Skagen> wrote:

I have never seen a Tin Lizzie but would a chair that has an adjustable seat that can be raised help? I'm 5'3 and that helps me with my regular sewing machines.

On Tuesday, June 15, 2021, 10:55:53 AM CDT, Sally Silvers <salsewsart@...> wrote:


My machine is  Tin Lizzie 18, too.  It has served me well with light use (life gets in the way) and even surviving a move.  My one complaint is that I can't see where I'm going when I stitch backwards.  I'm short, only about 5' and think maybe if Lizzie were lower, I'd see better.  Any suggestions would be welcome.


Re: Can't get the needle bar to move

Cat - N
 

Is your frame height adjustable? If so, maybe lower it…which will lower the machine, too.    

Is anything else blocking view…presser foot…inadequate lighting?   We got a clear presser foot that is rounded in the underside and use that except for rulers. 

- Cat

Typos courtesy of autocorrect. 



On Jun 15, 2021 at 11:55 AM, <Sally Silvers> wrote:

My machine is  Tin Lizzie 18, too.  It has served me well with light use (life gets in the way) and even surviving a move.  My one complaint is that I can't see where I'm going when I stitch backwards.  I'm short, only about 5' and think maybe if Lizzie were lower, I'd see better.  Any suggestions would be welcome.


Re: Can't get the needle bar to move

Kathy Skagen
 

I have never seen a Tin Lizzie but would a chair that has an adjustable seat that can be raised help? I'm 5'3 and that helps me with my regular sewing machines.

On Tuesday, June 15, 2021, 10:55:53 AM CDT, Sally Silvers <salsewsart@...> wrote:


My machine is  Tin Lizzie 18, too.  It has served me well with light use (life gets in the way) and even surviving a move.  My one complaint is that I can't see where I'm going when I stitch backwards.  I'm short, only about 5' and think maybe if Lizzie were lower, I'd see better.  Any suggestions would be welcome.


Re: Can't get the needle bar to move

Sally Silvers
 

My machine is  Tin Lizzie 18, too.  It has served me well with light use (life gets in the way) and even surviving a move.  My one complaint is that I can't see where I'm going when I stitch backwards.  I'm short, only about 5' and think maybe if Lizzie were lower, I'd see better.  Any suggestions would be welcome.


Re: Can't get the needle bar to move

Cat - N
 

A similar thing happened here a few years ago with hubby's long arm (made by Tin Lizzy) and it was thread in the bobbin area that caused it, too. I didn't know there was any issue at first because it took hubby by such surprise that he immediately called tech support...his long arm was very new when it happened, and we'd had a couple of the new parts that we bought with it (upgraded tablet controller and quilting robot) replaced because they didn't work correctly  We'd even wondered if we'd been accidentally shipped a machine/system that had been returned for having 'infant mortality' issues.

I’m glad your machine is going again.

- Cat




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