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Re: Tech support expiration on 15000

Pixey
 

Hi Marlyn,
Here are my thoughts on your conundrum...

First, you want to make sure you are getting a 15000 v3 Quiltmaker edition as it had some enhancements over the initially released 15000, such as the built in ruler foot functionality and some threader improvements.  I have an out of the box version 2 15000 that was upgraded by the dealer to a 15000 v3 Quiltmaker.  I do enjoy using it and it still works well. 

Also, you talk about the possibility of only using the 15000 a few months.  There is no guarantee that you will want to immediately upgrade to the new machine being unveiled in August.  None of us know precisely what is actually coming, it just seems like a new TOL makes sense as Janome has done upgrades of other machine paths the past several years. I honestly cannot identify anything that would be so “wow” as to necessarily warrant an immediate trade-in.  Given how much you like your 12000, you may decide really love your new 15000 and keep it longer.

Another thing to consider is whether any of the new machines are even going to be available.  With the current chip shortages and port backlogs (which many vendors are saying will continue on into 2022), they may unveil a new machine in August but dealers may not have many on hand at first.

Finally, I know some members of the group are early adopters when a new machine comes out and that is fine (to each their own).  However, when it comes to major new releases, I prefer to sit back a bit, read the reviews and wait for some of the bugs to get worked out with updates.  That way I have a better idea of what to expect if I do get the machine.   I think I usually get a better price that way too.  

On the one hand, I think the price he is quoting you for a potentially end of life cycle machine is a little high.  But on the flip side, he is giving you a very generous trade on your 12000 which will only continue to degrease in value, probably dramatically after a new replacement is announced.  So a 15000 upgrade does make some sense.

Pixey

On Jun 10, 2021, at 3:48 PM, Stockman via groups.io <allanderkacz@...> wrote:



[Edited Message Follows]

I have the Horizon 12000 which I love, but am giving thought to buying the Horizon Quilt Maker 15000.  I believe that shortly after the new generation sewing/embroidery machine is debuted in September that Janome’s support for the 12000 will be discontinued.  So,  I was wondering what’s the estimate on how long Janome will continue to support the Horizon Quilt Maker 15000 since technically is ever advancing.

Heres the kicker, my dealer is offering a trade in on my Horizon 12000 for $4000 with purchase of Horizon 15000 for $12,999 and later he will apply the whole amount of the $9000. Towards the new machine that comes out in September if I want to change up to it and of course I would have pay the difference.  I am just wondering, if it is a wise idea to purchase the Horizon 15000 just for a few months.  For those of you who own the 15000, are you still expressed with it and would you  just as soon keep the 15000 or would you buy the next generation in September.   Your comments would be most appreciated.
Marlyn


Re: Tech support expiration on 15000

Ceil J
 

Marlyn,
Not sure where you live but I think that price is way too high!  Also, prices for the 15000 should drop after the intro of the new machine but should never be at the MSRP.  I'm in the US and paid either $8000 or $9000 for my 15000  six year ago.  (sorry but memory is on the downslide).  Just my opinion.
Ceil


Re: Tech support expiration on 15000

Narda Poulin
 

 I Think $9000 is way too much for the 15000...I bought mine $6000 4 years ago


Re: Tech support expiration on 15000

Margaret Schwab
 

I don't buy a lot of machines; I guess my feeling is that unless there are big changes that allow me to do way more, I would be content with my 15000. I also own the memory craft 10001 and the 3160 QDC. The 10001 is set up for sewing when the 15000 is busy doing embroidery and the 3160 is for taking to class. I do all of my own quilting both free motion and walking foot and also do quite a bit for the quilting charity group I belong to. It all gets done on the 15000 even very large quilts. Sometimes that is a challenge, but it always seems to work. I have had the 15000 for almost 8 years and I think the only thing that would make me buy a newer model would be an extremely large throat that was closer to a mid- arm quilting machine. 
So, it is a personal choice for sure, but I am very pleased with my 15000. 
Margaret, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. 

On Thu, Jun 10, 2021 at 1:55 PM Stockman via groups.io <allanderkacz=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I have the Horizon 12000 which I love, but am giving thought to buying the Horizon Quilt Maker 15000.  I believe that shortly after the new generation sewing/embroidery machine is debuted in September that Janome’s support for the 12000 will be discontinued.  So,  I was wondering what’s the estimate on how long Janome will continue to support the Horizon Quilt Maker 15000 since technically is ever advancing.

Heres the kicker, my dealer is offering a trade in on my Horizon 12000 for $4000 with purchase of Horizon 15000 for $9000, and later he will apply the whole amount of the $9000. Towards the new machine that comes out in September if I want to change up to it and of course I would have pay the difference.  I am just wondering, if it is a wise idea to purchase the Horizon 15000 just for a few months.  For those of you who own the 15000, are you still expressed with it and would you  just as soon keep the 15000 or would you buy the next generation in September.   Your comments would be most appreciated.
Marlyn


Tech support expiration on 15000

Marlyn
 
Edited

I have the Horizon 12000 which I love, but am giving thought to buying the Horizon Quilt Maker 15000.  I believe that shortly after the new generation sewing/embroidery machine is debuted in September that Janome’s support for the 12000 will be discontinued.  So,  I was wondering what’s the estimate on how long Janome will continue to support the Horizon Quilt Maker 15000 since technically is ever advancing.

Heres the kicker, my dealer is offering a trade in on my Horizon 12000 for $4000 with purchase of Horizon 15000 for $12,999 and later he will apply the whole amount of the $9000. Towards the new machine that comes out in September if I want to change up to it and of course I would have pay the difference.  I am just wondering, if it is a wise idea to purchase the Horizon 15000 just for a few months.  For those of you who own the 15000, are you still impressed with it and would you  just as soon keep the 15000 or would you buy the next generation in September.   Your comments would be most appreciated.
Marlyn


Re: sewing polyester

Cheryl Paul
 

Thanks Faviola.

Re: Slow start up on my serger and Coverhem
I did know about the slow start on these mechanical machines, but had “sort of” forgotten. Our computerized sewing machines have really done a good job of spoiling us and fast. I will just continue to use lots of patience when I use these 2 mechanical machines - I love them both.

I’ll be using the serger as a 2-thread to trim and finish the edges of my grandson’s quilt so that he can apply the binding. I had him make his own birthday present for June 28th - the BIG day. We had some good bonding time during the sewing process. It seems I get to spend more time with his 2 sisters than with him and his younger brother. I'll put a picture in the files when we are finished - next week I hope.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


Re: sewing instructions?

Joyce Daniel
 

Thanks a ton for the thumbs up on persevering w this pattern and nutso instructions I thought it was just this pattern but seems to be an issue w lots of others Maybe it’s a language issue . Sounds like that would be good to major in and have on your resume and good English skills 🤗


Re: sewing polyester

Pixey
 

I noticed the same thing with my CoverPro and both sergers. I also noticed similar behavior with my HD9 (which is a much more mechanical machine than my computerized ones).

Pixey


On Jun 9, 2021, at 9:50 AM, favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:

Cheryl, it's been my experience with sergers (& a CoverPro works similarly, I don't own one) that when we press on the foot pedal, it takes a few moments for the stitching to actually start.
It has something to do with the fact that it's mechanical, not like our computerized machines, that start sewing almost instantly.
At least in my use of 2 different brands of sergers there's always that 'humming' or grinding' sound that precedes the machine starting to stitch.
My friend I was helping last week, was using the newest Janome Air Threader serger, mine is a lower end Janome and we both had the exact same start up time when we press the foot pedal.
I don't think it's something we can do to change it, and even stepping harder on the control doesn't really make it start quicker.
Just stay steady!
--
Favymtz


Re: sewing instructions?

Claire Schutz
 

I would like to suggest to those who sew clothing they check out Peggy Sagers of Fit To Stitch. She is on YouTube. She has so much info about fitting and what to do with  a pattern, you may find your answer.  She sells Silhouette Patterns. I found if I watched more than one show the info can be immense. I will be trying to make slacks and she is the person to go to. Also, she explains how to use parts of different patterns avoiding purchasing many individual patterns, a saving for sure. Hope this helps, Claire S.

On 6/8/2021 12:03 PM, Pixey via groups.io wrote:
I too have been frustrated by some of the instructions on more recent commercial patterns.  I have some older patterns in my stash where the instructions were much clearer.  I purchased a dog coat pattern last year and it was ridiculously convoluted in how they put it together.  I pretty much ignored the instructions and applied some common sense and it worked out fine.   I have also been frustrated at the thin tissue being used by them these, it tears if you even look at it.  
 
One of the other challenges I see is that the patterns may use several steps to accomplish something that our higher end machines have a built in function for doing (such as gathering and basting).
 
These days for many of my projects I am using some basic sewing and design reference books and creating my own patterns.  For things like pull up cotton pajama pants, I am creating patterns from the finished garment (adding extra seam allowances when applicable).
 
Pixey
 


Re: sewing polyester

Cat - N
 

You've got me curious now...will have to fire up my Pfaff 4874 to see how long it takes to start stitching after pressing the foot pedal...and whether there's 'humming' or 'grinding' as well.  lol

- Cat



Re: sewing polyester

favymtz
 

Cheryl, it's been my experience with sergers (& a CoverPro works similarly, I don't own one) that when we press on the foot pedal, it takes a few moments for the stitching to actually start.
It has something to do with the fact that it's mechanical, not like our computerized machines, that start sewing almost instantly.
At least in my use of 2 different brands of sergers there's always that 'humming' or grinding' sound that precedes the machine starting to stitch.
My friend I was helping last week, was using the newest Janome Air Threader serger, mine is a lower end Janome and we both had the exact same start up time when we press the foot pedal.
I don't think it's something we can do to change it, and even stepping harder on the control doesn't really make it start quicker.
Just stay steady!
--
Favymtz


Re: sewing instructions?

favymtz
 

I'll put my 2cents in as well! Last week I was helping/teaching a friend how to make a blouse.
We purchased our similar patterns from 2 different pattern company's.
Both were faairly simple basic blouses.
Because of my years of experience I was able to determine that the way that the patterns were written were full of problems.
For example, one pattern had the order of construction in such a weird order that it didn't even make sense to put the pieces together in that sequence.
Also, the lack of instruction and clear pictures in BOTH patterns was actually very discouraging for a new sewist.
My friend told me more than once she would've never been able to construct her blouse alone if she had to follow the pattern instructions!
--
Favymtz


Re: Horizon 15000 touch screen problem

Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...>
 

Thanks, Judy. I'll try it. It sure can't hurt.
Kathy

On Tuesday, June 8, 2021, 09:15:59 PM CDT, Judy Albert via groups.io <judy.albert@...> wrote:


My screen on the MC12000 freezes up sometimes, usually if it is in a cold room. But if I turn it on and let it warm up (like about an hour), it will then work.  It’s worth a try.

Judy in No. VA


sewing instructions?

Cat - N
 

I am aware that mistakes are found at times on patterns, so contacting McCalls might be an option. If it is an error, they might be able to provide corrections for your student. 

You might also look online at ‘free’ patterns for similar style pants to see how those are constructed.

I definitely sympathize with your student’s (and your) plight.  I am making two little girls’ dresses from a Vogue pattern (redesigned a bit from the original), and the pattern had positional dots on the princess bodice which are not mentioned at all on the four pages, and I literally had to read them all because I grew up making princess style bodice dresses for myself and those did not have positional alignment dots.   

I am making a sleeveless version…part of my redesign…but I figured out, by looking at all the pieces, even those I wasn’t using…that the dots are for additional matching positions for the sleeves to the bodice. But, you’d think positional dots would be mentioned since alignment would be a key instruction when alignment marks are put on a pattern.  

It isn’t ’all’ patterns that aren’t clear…the  pattern I use to make Hawaiian shirts for hubby has pretty decent instructions, even if I do choose to do a few things differently than called for by the pattern instructions. 

- Cat

Typos courtesy of autocorrect. 



On Jun 8, 2021 at 8:47 AM, <JoAnn Novak> wrote:

I find that is common with the directions.   Even with something hubby buys & puts together.   The instructions are not clear or make sense.  He just uses his common sense & puts together the way he thinks.  It is very frustrating.   Guess people just do not think clearly any more.  

Try making it with some scrap material first the part that makes no sense to see it you can figure it out. 

JoAnn (Wisconsin)

Life's biggest decision is what you do with Jesus.
On 6/9/2021 1:09 AM, Joyce Daniel wrote:

I have been teaching a design student to sew. She picked out a McCall’s pants pattern that has a draw/bag type waist……looked simple enough. It has inset pockets and a front zipper…..and directions that make absolutely no sense at all…..I consider myself an advanced sewist and these directions are for someone who is super duper advanced. Is there a group, etc. that could help decipher sewing pattern instructions? Maybe, I should contact McCall’s? Funny thing is we started these pants last summer and she went off to college and I was hoping they would disappear, but she just got home and the first thing she asked was if we could finish up the pants again. Agghh!

Joyce

 


Re: Horizon 15000 touch screen problem

Judy Albert
 

My screen on the MC12000 freezes up sometimes, usually if it is in a cold room. But if I turn it on and let it warm up (like about an hour), it will then work.  It’s worth a try.

Judy in No. VA


Re: sewing instructions?

Cheryl Paul
 

Joyce, I’d contact McCall’s. I one bought a Sandra Betzina pants pattern for a class that I took with her and Ron Collin’s in Edmonton and when it was time for my fitting, she couldn’t understand whey so many adjustments were needed. She looked at the pattern and eventually asked to see the envelope it came in. Apparently McCall’s had made a mistake when printing the pattern and the crotch seam wasn’t correct. They did a recall on the pattern and printed as Sandra wanted the fit to be. I was an unlucky person who didn’t get the “memo” to return my pattern for the new one. To say the least those pants never got finished and I didn’t benefit to have a fitting pair of pants and pattern. I did learn some, but it cost me mega bucks and no slacks or adjusted pattern to use in the future.

There may be a solution that McCall’s can address. Another solution would be to just wing it and try to do what you think should be done to make it work. There has to be a solution. Maybe another pattern could be used and she adjusts it to work with what has been cut and sew already. Is that at all possible?

Please let us know what happens with these pants. You have my curiosity working full time with this question.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


Re: sewing polyester

Cheryl Paul
 

No, my CoverPro 2000 works very well and doesn’t tunnel, unless I pull a thread that I don’t mean to when I’m taking out the garment from under the needles. I’ve learned to be careful when I do this. I’m still very much in the learning process of the CoverHem machine as it isn’t a machine I use daily or even on a weekly basis - just occasionally - but I love it as it gives that professional look to a garment.

If I had a wish for this machine and my serger it would be that it started out sewing like my sewing machine do - gradually. I hold the foot down and it whirs a lot until I press harder - this always makes me feel like it is going to race away on me. I may not be describing this well, but if someone who does has a tip for me, I’d sure be glad to hear it.

A dear friend passed away last December (not from COVID) and I purchased a couple of her machines and one was her CoverPro 2000 to give to my granddaughter. She’s not sure that she will be allowed to have it as there are 3 more children younger in their very crowded home. A big house becomes smaller as the children grow up and these kids are aged 7-15, so they are getting bigger - Ava is almost as tall as her Mom and definitely a bit taller than me.
She’ll get it eventually and in the meantime she can sew on it in Grandma’s house. She’s better at this machine than I am.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


Re: sewing instructions?

Pixey
 

I too have been frustrated by some of the instructions on more recent commercial patterns.  I have some older patterns in my stash where the instructions were much clearer.  I purchased a dog coat pattern last year and it was ridiculously convoluted in how they put it together.  I pretty much ignored the instructions and applied some common sense and it worked out fine.   I have also been frustrated at the thin tissue being used by them these, it tears if you even look at it.  

One of the other challenges I see is that the patterns may use several steps to accomplish something that our higher end machines have a built in function for doing (such as gathering and basting).

These days for many of my projects I am using some basic sewing and design reference books and creating my own patterns.  For things like pull up cotton pajama pants, I am creating patterns from the finished garment (adding extra seam allowances when applicable).

Pixey



On Jun 8, 2021, at 11:21 AM, Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...> wrote:


Joyce,
I have noticed that, for years now, the instructions for major pattern companies have become more difficult to understand. The instructions used to have many detailed illustrations to help the reader and allowed the inexperienced to be able to teach themselves, but now it is paired down to the bare minimum and sometimes is not the logical way to proceed. 
I would say that if you know a way to achieve the same result, do it your way. That will be a good lesson for the young lady to learn also--that there is often more than one way to do something and the end result is what is important. As a design student, I'd say that this is a great learning opportunity for her!
Kathy

On Monday, June 7, 2021, 08:59:33 PM CDT, Joyce Daniel <mdaniel@...> wrote:


I have been teaching a design student to sew. She picked out a McCall’s pants pattern that has a draw/bag type waist……looked simple enough. It has inset pockets and a front zipper…..and directions that make absolutely no sense at all…..I consider myself an advanced sewist and these directions are for someone who is super duper advanced. Is there a group, etc. that could help decipher sewing pattern instructions? Maybe, I should contact McCall’s? Funny thing is we started these pants last summer and she went off to college and I was hoping they would disappear, but she just got home and the first thing she asked was if we could finish up the pants again. Agghh!

Joyce

 


Re: sewing instructions?

Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...>
 

Joyce,
I have noticed that, for years now, the instructions for major pattern companies have become more difficult to understand. The instructions used to have many detailed illustrations to help the reader and allowed the inexperienced to be able to teach themselves, but now it is paired down to the bare minimum and sometimes is not the logical way to proceed. 
I would say that if you know a way to achieve the same result, do it your way. That will be a good lesson for the young lady to learn also--that there is often more than one way to do something and the end result is what is important. As a design student, I'd say that this is a great learning opportunity for her!
Kathy

On Monday, June 7, 2021, 08:59:33 PM CDT, Joyce Daniel <mdaniel@...> wrote:


I have been teaching a design student to sew. She picked out a McCall’s pants pattern that has a draw/bag type waist……looked simple enough. It has inset pockets and a front zipper…..and directions that make absolutely no sense at all…..I consider myself an advanced sewist and these directions are for someone who is super duper advanced. Is there a group, etc. that could help decipher sewing pattern instructions? Maybe, I should contact McCall’s? Funny thing is we started these pants last summer and she went off to college and I was hoping they would disappear, but she just got home and the first thing she asked was if we could finish up the pants again. Agghh!

Joyce

 


Re: Horizon 15000 touch screen problem

Kathy Skagen <kagen48@...>
 

Oh dear! That sounds like it will be expensive. It is not under warrantee. I'll be taking it in tomorrow.
Thank you, Jim.
Kathy

On Monday, June 7, 2021, 09:00:23 PM CDT, Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:


It sounds like the touch screen may have failed. You'll need to have your dealer/technician take a look at it.

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