Date   

Re: Horizon 15000 touch screen problem

Jim Stutsman
 

It sounds like the touch screen may have failed. You'll need to have your dealer/technician take a look at it.


sewing instructions?

Joyce Daniel
 

I have been teaching a design student to sew. She picked out a McCall’s pants pattern that has a draw/bag type waist……looked simple enough. It has inset pockets and a front zipper…..and directions that make absolutely no sense at all…..I consider myself an advanced sewist and these directions are for someone who is super duper advanced. Is there a group, etc. that could help decipher sewing pattern instructions? Maybe, I should contact McCall’s? Funny thing is we started these pants last summer and she went off to college and I was hoping they would disappear, but she just got home and the first thing she asked was if we could finish up the pants again. Agghh!

Joyce

 


Auto Buttonhole Not Working

dmrestates
 

I have MC10001 that has been a workhorse. The embroidery is absolutely beautiful and the ordinary sewing has been flawless until today.  I put the auto buttonhole foot on and pulled the lever down and the button in the slot.  It sews the right side and the end part perfectly, but when it starts sewing the left side, it does not stop but keeps going past the place where it should stop. Any idea what could be wrong?


Horizon 15000 touch screen problem

Kathy Skagen
 

Hello all,
I have a question that I hope someone has an answer for. I have been busy and have not turned my 15000 on for about 2 weeks. I just turned it on and the touch screen seems to be stuck/frozen with the message "Resume last pattern"? There is an OK button and an X button. Nothing responds. I cannot push either button and none of the icons along the bottom of the screen work. I have turned it off and unplugged it with no difference. 
I just thought I'd ask in case there is something simple that I can do to fix this. The machine will not sew either. 
Thank you!
Kathy


Re: sewing polyester

Cat - N
 

Cheryl, are you saying that you get 'tunneling/puffing' between your needle threads on your CoverPro 2000 when using coverstitch?  Just wondering...

- Cat


-----Original Message-----
From: Cheryl Paul <capaul@...>
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Sent: Sun, Jun 6, 2021 4:12 pm
Subject: Re: [onlinesewing-janome] sewing polyester

I haven’t tried sewing a hem with a wide double needle on my 15000, because I have a CoverPro 2000.  It creates the same problem when I hem my t-shirts.  To avoid this I have tried a number of things
1.  a stabilizer called - Knit Stay Tape.  It’s made my SewkeysE - I have it in Ivory, Black, White and there is a light beige as well.  It comes in a few widths.  I like 1/2” as I also use this in the shoulders of my t-shirts.  It can also be used in the side seams if they tend to ripple or in a very unstable knit as some of the rayon ones.  I also have it in 1” and 1 1/4”.  I cut the 1” in half if I run out.  It is “iron-on” but use a press cloth to attach it as it will do funny things if you don’t.

2.  Floriani Wet N Gone Tacky Tape is one I used recently and it is wonderful BUT, you can’t stretch your fabric.  Why I really like it is because you can just press it on with your fingers, turn up the hem and stitch away.  I was very careful, as I once tried this quite a while ago and found that the machine pushed the fabric on top stretching it a little then I ended up at the end with “extra” fabric - just a pinch, but I wasn’t happy and had to “unseen” it and do it over.  It washes out when you put the garment through the laundry - wear it first - no need to not get that FIRST wearing when it is spanking, brand new.

These would work with a sewing machine as well as a Cover Hem machine.

I was able to get the Floriani product from my local Janome (and many other brands) machine dealer and the Knit Stay Tape from my hour away Janome Dealer.  These should be available to you from some close by.

Also you can take a tacky washable stabilizer and strip it to use as was suggested.  This also works with a a fusible knit interfacing that is very thin - I think it might be referred to as fuse-knit - get a light weight as you don’t want it to show or be bulky.  We like our tasks to be easy while we make our garments.  We just need to do some prep work and that sometimes seems to be a time waster but believe me it is not.

Cheryl - Saskatoon





Re: Is This Something?

Jim Stutsman
 

A picture of the removed fibers wouldn't be of much help anyway. Much better to have a picture of where they came from. The area you mentioned (first thread guide) contains a small spring, shaped like a ski. It's under a cover, so you can't see it.  It provides very light tension on the thread when winding a bobbin. In normal sewing it does little except keep the thread where it should be, BUT if the thread is pulled backward, i.e. toward the spool, when changing colors that little spring tends to shave tiny fibers off the thread. It will build up to the point that it starts adding tension to the stitches, and sometimes making bobbins wind wonky. During service there may have been a thread "clot" that was dislodged, but not noticed by the technician, and that's likely what you pulled out. So that's good, and it's OK.


Is This Something?

Kathy Strabel
 

Greetings: Someone with some machine repair experience might be able to answer this:  I will skip the frustrating details, but let's just say that I picked up my machine from a repair and when I got it home, I found some very fine fibers sticking out of the slot where the first thread guide is attached on my E500 Embroidery-only machine.  I used tweezers to pull on these baby-fine fibers, and what came out was a compacted "bullet" of white fibers. About 1/4" in diameter and sort of random in shape. Far as I know, this is not an oiling point, so probably not an oil wick of any kind.  It had no oil or moisture on it.  My question is this: Is this an oil wick or other "thing" that is supposed to be in that area? If so, what IS it?  It did not take any force to remove it, it just came out with the tweezers. Unfortunately,I set it on the table and either my cat found it and played with it, or aliens took it away, so I cannot take a picture.  I know I could just call the same guy who did the repairs, but that is probably not a good idea at the moment.  Any information appreciated.
Kathy Strabel   Camas WA


Re: sewing polyester

Cheryl Paul
 

I haven’t tried sewing a hem with a wide double needle on my 15000, because I have a CoverPro 2000. It creates the same problem when I hem my t-shirts. To avoid this I have tried a number of things
1. a stabilizer called - Knit Stay Tape. It’s made my SewkeysE - I have it in Ivory, Black, White and there is a light beige as well. It comes in a few widths. I like 1/2” as I also use this in the shoulders of my t-shirts. It can also be used in the side seams if they tend to ripple or in a very unstable knit as some of the rayon ones. I also have it in 1” and 1 1/4”. I cut the 1” in half if I run out. It is “iron-on” but use a press cloth to attach it as it will do funny things if you don’t.

2. Floriani Wet N Gone Tacky Tape is one I used recently and it is wonderful BUT, you can’t stretch your fabric. Why I really like it is because you can just press it on with your fingers, turn up the hem and stitch away. I was very careful, as I once tried this quite a while ago and found that the machine pushed the fabric on top stretching it a little then I ended up at the end with “extra” fabric - just a pinch, but I wasn’t happy and had to “unseen” it and do it over. It washes out when you put the garment through the laundry - wear it first - no need to not get that FIRST wearing when it is spanking, brand new.

These would work with a sewing machine as well as a Cover Hem machine.

I was able to get the Floriani product from my local Janome (and many other brands) machine dealer and the Knit Stay Tape from my hour away Janome Dealer. These should be available to you from some close by.

Also you can take a tacky washable stabilizer and strip it to use as was suggested. This also works with a a fusible knit interfacing that is very thin - I think it might be referred to as fuse-knit - get a light weight as you don’t want it to show or be bulky. We like our tasks to be easy while we make our garments. We just need to do some prep work and that sometimes seems to be a time waster but believe me it is not.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


Re: Lighting- Luminess Light Station

Teresa Stanulis
 

I bought 1 small for over my MC15000 and 1 large for over my Grace quilt frame.

Teresa

On Jun 6, 2021, at 10:13 AM, Carolyn Gazerro <carolyngazerro@...> wrote:

Great to know.  I am thinking of getting two large. One to cover my sewing machine and serger area.  The other for my work table.

Carolyn 🌹

On Jun 6, 2021, at 10:31 AM, Teresa Stanulis via groups.io <tstanulis@...> wrote:

Hi Carolyn,

I bought this for over my sewing machine and it has helped me a lot  Actually, I bought one for over my quilting frame too, but I haven’t set it up yet.  It is big and kind of bulky, but provides great light.  The wheels move easily,if you need to roll it around to other areas.  One of the bulb units went out and I couldn’t figure out how to just replace the bulb, so I borrowed a unit from the one I haven’t put together yet.  I need to contact Grace company about getting a replacement.

Hope this helps!

Teresa Stanulis

On Jun 5, 2021, at 11:03 PM, Carolyn Gazerro <carolyngazerro@...> wrote:

Looking for feedback for this item.  Thinking of purchasing it.
https://www.graceframe.com/en/accessories/luminess



Re: sewing polyester

Sally Silvers
 

You have some good suggestions already and I'm going to add one more:  Pin a strip of paper, 1 inch or so, behind where your stitching will go.  Of course, you have to tear it away once you've stitched, but that will prevent stretching.


Re: Lighting- Luminess Light Station

Carolyn Gazerro
 

Great to know.  I am thinking of getting two large. One to cover my sewing machine and serger area.  The other for my work table.

Carolyn 🌹

On Jun 6, 2021, at 10:31 AM, Teresa Stanulis via groups.io <tstanulis@...> wrote:

Hi Carolyn,

I bought this for over my sewing machine and it has helped me a lot.  Actually, I bought one for over my quilting frame too, but I haven’t set it up yet.  It is big and kind of bulky, but provides great light.  The wheels move easily,if you need to roll it around to other areas.  One of the bulb units went out and I couldn’t figure out how to just replace the bulb, so I borrowed a unit from the one I haven’t put together yet.  I need to contact Grace company about getting a replacement.

Hope this helps!

Teresa Stanulis

On Jun 5, 2021, at 11:03 PM, Carolyn Gazerro <carolyngazerro@...> wrote:

Looking for feedback for this item.  Thinking of purchasing it.
https://www.graceframe.com/en/accessories/luminess


Re: sewing polyester

Pixey
 

Carole,

You don’t say how many shirts you want to hem. But if it is a large number or ongoing project, investing in a cover lock or serger with cover lock stitch capabilities might be worth exploring.  I have a Janome CoverPro 1000 CPX that I use to shorten hems and sleeves on t-shirts and golf style shirts and it is great at it.

Pixey


On Jun 5, 2021, at 8:45 AM, Carole O'Mara <caroleinco@...> wrote:



I would like to hem golf shirts--100% polyester, some poly & about 9% spandex.  How do I keep the hems from looking like ruffles? Since these fabrics don't ravel, I do not need to finish the raw edge...just trim, fold fabric to wrong side and stitch.  I'd like 2 rows of stitches about 1/4" apart as that would look best as these shirts are worn untucked.  I have MC15000.  Thank you for any suggestions.  

Carole - Colorado


Re: sewing polyester

favymtz
 

Kathy gave really good instructions, and I also feel that stabilizing the fabric to sew it is key. I'll add a few more tips that I find useful.
Sometimes I just starch the shirt hem and press it dry to gain that stabilization for the sewing.
There's bias knit fusible interfacing that comes on a roll that stabilizes the hem, it works great.
If using a  Stretch Twin needle, lessen the upper tension so that the fabric doesn't tunnel as you sew it.
(Or maybe using a blue bobbin case would accomplish the same thing, but I haven't tried it, only in theory it seems like it would work!)
Lightly stretch the hem as you sew it when using a straight stitch because the knit fabric needs to retain that stretchiness,
Otherwise your straight stitches will pop.
Many stitches work well for knits, I sometimes use the # 21 in Utility for knit hems, it's a little bit decorative, #25 is also a good one for knits and looks like the underside of a Cover Hem.
--
Favymtz


Re: Lighting- Luminess Light Station

Teresa Stanulis
 

Hi Carolyn,

I bought this for over my sewing machine and it has helped me a lot.  Actually, I bought one for over my quilting frame too, but I haven’t set it up yet.  It is big and kind of bulky, but provides great light.  The wheels move easily,if you need to roll it around to other areas.  One of the bulb units went out and I couldn’t figure out how to just replace the bulb, so I borrowed a unit from the one I haven’t put together yet.  I need to contact Grace company about getting a replacement.

Hope this helps!

Teresa Stanulis

On Jun 5, 2021, at 11:03 PM, Carolyn Gazerro <carolyngazerro@...> wrote:

Looking for feedback for this item.  Thinking of purchasing it.
https://www.graceframe.com/en/accessories/luminess


Lighting- Luminess Light Station

Carolyn Gazerro
 

Looking for feedback for this item.  Thinking of purchasing it.
https://www.graceframe.com/en/accessories/luminess


Re: sewing polyester

Padden, Jennifer R
 

It helps for you to use a walking foot with a ball point needle.


On Sat, Jun 5, 2021, 8:45 AM Carole O'Mara <caroleinco@...> wrote:

I would like to hem golf shirts--100% polyester, some poly & about 9% spandex.  How do I keep the hems from looking like ruffles? Since these fabrics don't ravel, I do not need to finish the raw edge...just trim, fold fabric to wrong side and stitch.  I'd like 2 rows of stitches about 1/4" apart as that would look best as these shirts are worn untucked.  I have MC15000.  Thank you for any suggestions.  

Carole - Colorado


Re: sewing polyester

Kathy Strabel
 

Carole--I do this when I sew the hems on poly/lycra swimwear. I usually make a separate tank-type of top to go over the briefs bottoms for myself.

Cut some 1" strips of washaway sticky stabilizer--enough to cover the circumference of your shirt bottom plus a little overlap. Do not leave any gaps in the stabilizer.    Press up your hem allowance, then stick the stabilizer on the inside of the shirt bottom, being sure to place it so your needle will penetrate the fabric AND the stabilizer. Stitch your hem as desired. I have the best results from using Janome purple tip needles and Coats and Clark Dual duty thread. You can use a double needle if you want single lines of thread spaced evenly, but I do not use that type of needle. Instead, I use one of the stretch stitches that resembles a serger stitch. AFter stitching your hem, your shirt bottom will be non-stretch until you soak or wash the shirt and the stabilizer disappears.   Good luck. You might want to do a couple practice runs before stitching on your golf shirts!! Happy (stretchy!) stitching!!!!   Kathy Strabel   Camas WA

On Sat, Jun 5, 2021 at 6:45 AM Carole O'Mara <caroleinco@...> wrote:

I would like to hem golf shirts--100% polyester, some poly & about 9% spandex.  How do I keep the hems from looking like ruffles? Since these fabrics don't ravel, I do not need to finish the raw edge...just trim, fold fabric to wrong side and stitch.  I'd like 2 rows of stitches about 1/4" apart as that would look best as these shirts are worn untucked.  I have MC15000.  Thank you for any suggestions.  

Carole - Colorado



--
Have a good one!
Kathy Strabel





Re: sewing polyester

Carolyn Gazerro
 

Use a wide double needle. It will encase. You don’t need to fold it. If fabric still ravels use see through wash away on top, tear it away and just wash away the remainder of stabilizer.

🌹Carolyn


sewing polyester

Carole O'Mara
 

I would like to hem golf shirts--100% polyester, some poly & about 9% spandex.  How do I keep the hems from looking like ruffles? Since these fabrics don't ravel, I do not need to finish the raw edge...just trim, fold fabric to wrong side and stitch.  I'd like 2 rows of stitches about 1/4" apart as that would look best as these shirts are worn untucked.  I have MC15000.  Thank you for any suggestions.  

Carole - Colorado


Re: Bobbin Winding issues on 10000 & 550e

mah_jongg
 

Thanks Jim,

I'll email your response to my machine mechanic for a heads up on the solutions to my problems.

Thanks again & have a safe & happy holiday weekend.

mahjongg

981 - 1000 of 29394