Date   

Re: Inconsistent tension on 1500

Mary Mills
 

Thanks for this advice, she brought a yellow tip and the stitching is much improved, I will pass your advice onto her.   Thanks to everyone who helped her, she is much happier.  Regards, Mary in Australia 


Re: Inconsistent tension on 1500

Nyssa Lanzafame
 

which edition of the machine do you have?  there is a plate on the top where the thread first goes through.  this is an area often over looked for lint/ debris build up- a lot of techs will not even access this during a service, unless requested. i am not sure why, but the first edition of the 15000 has this plate as easily removed by the user, and is included in the manual to do so.  i am not sure if it went away in the 2cnd or 3rd edition...maybe Jim can chime in on this?  i would look it up but having trouble with headaches right now.  Also, you can easily swing open the door to clean the top thread area---i love this about this machine! ( i have a different machine that i have to use a screw driver and then there are these pesky little clips that i am scared are going to break!)
Nys


Janome Artistic Digitizer

mah_jongg
 

Does anyone know how or if the Janome Artistic Digitizer software can send more than 1 jef file at a time via usb cable from computer to sewing machine. Cannot seem to find any info other than sending 1 design at a time. With Customizer (user friendly) I could send multiple designs at once.

thanks,
mahjongg


Re: Inconsistent tension on 1500

Elizabeth Mccall
 

Hi Nyssa, I have not taken off the top tension cover. I'm not sure how to access this , but will look into it. 
I clean my machine often, cleaning the bobbin case & area around it. Also I take it in yearly for a checkup.
It just seems the yellow dot works better for a smooth tension.
Thanks so much for your answer.
Elizabeth Ann McCall

On Fri, Aug 7, 2020 at 2:28 PM Nyssa Lanzafame <Nyssajoe@...> wrote:
if the stitch balance works better with the yellow, it should be fine.  but it seems like that would indicate that the upper tension is a little tighter than the factory setting should be, or that the thread is hanging up somewhere....possibly a burr or a lint or a piece of thread somewhere, have you taken your top tension cover off to look?


Embroidery Software Recommendation

Jill Olson
 

I am also wondering about Embroidery software. I have a 15,000 Embroidery machine and have been using either 11.000 Customizer or Art and Stitch Basic. The Art and Stitch Basic came with my HQ Amara package and will transfer embroidery designs to thumb drives already set up with the folder. There is an new update to Art and Stitch, Art and Stitch Plus which will create designs.  I'm wondering if I should purchase that or if I need something else. Now the Customizer is not always working with new purchased designs. I also thought the Artisitic was too pricey for my needs.  What do you suggest?

Jill Olson


Re: MC6500Pro foot

vicki J. Wardwell <vjw_65@...>
 

Found it and one for only elastic Thank you sew much!
--
Vicki Jane Hull- Wardwell


Re: Mac Embroidery Software Recommendation

Estelle Torpy
 

EmbrIlliance is embroidery software that comes in parts. You purchase as much or as little as fits your needs. There are video lessons on YouTube and a manual. It is native to Mac but there is also a PC version. I have it on my iMac and a PC laptop. I find it relatively easy to use. All software has a learning curve. I have had Pfaff software, very expensive but I was teaching for a shop then and got a deal. I have used Embird, great software but for PC. 

EmbrIlliance has a free 30 day trial like most software. I do a lot of lettering, quilt labels, birth announcements and the name tags for the local quilt guild. EmbrIlliance works well for me because I can just type in what I need, even several lines and then can kern and make a variety of adjustments depending on the font I am using.

Download the trial and give it a spin. Good Luck,  Estelle


On Aug 7, 2020, at 9:37 AM, Sharron Brittingham via groups.io <brittisl1018@...> wrote:



I’m looking for a recommendation for an embroidery software I can use on a Mac. I recently did the free trial of Janome Artistic Designer and liked the software. I was very comfortable using the software but not with the price. I’m not sure how often I would use the software and did not want to spend that much on something I might not use often. 

What other embroidery software do y’all use?


Re: Mac Embroidery Software Recommendation

Sharron Brittingham <brittisl1018@...>
 

Thanks so much Jim!  Stitch Buddy looks like a great option for me. 


Re: Mac Embroidery Software Recommendation

Mattes
 

Thanks for your kudos, which I highly value (and I mean it) ... being the developer of StitchBuddy. Just for the sake of transparency: I had to remove the option to clean up hidden files and ejecting the USB drive when StitchBuddy moved into the App Store to comply with Apple‘s Store Guideline.

But so far I found every not ancient embroidery machine being able to just ignore these files.

@Sharron: Just download the free version from the store and test if it fits your needs: The trial version comes with all features, only saving designs with more than 1,000 stitches requires an In-App purchase.

Greetings, Mattes


AcuDesign or Stitchbuddy HD?

Nyssa Lanzafame
 

Just wondering if anyone is familiar with both AcuDesign and Stitchbuddy HD?  

i have played with Acudesign one time, and was impressed with the ability in such a small package!!  the most impressive thing, though i have no idea how true it is, was that i was told that when decreasing design size it would actually remove stitches!!  Maybe Jim or someone can confirm this and explain the process?  I would imagine there are a couple of ways a program could do this--does it remove stitches when the size of the stitch itself is less than a certain value?  I know of a program that does this-it is still very limiting as when a design is made with say 2.5mm stitches and that limiting number is say set to 1.8mm, too many stitches disappear when you decrease the design size and the design is missing too many stitches...  so then maybe the ultimate would be if the program could combine like stitches, so if you decrease design size by 50% it would take two 2.5mm long stitches and make it into one stitch....anyways just wondering if anyone has an thoughts there.

Is stitchBuddy HD more like Acudesign or more like AcuEdit?  or is it somewhere in the middle.  I'm still not able to easily move files in and out of Acu Anything!!!  so there is that....


Re: Inconsistent tension on 1500

Nyssa Lanzafame
 

if the stitch balance works better with the yellow, it should be fine.  but it seems like that would indicate that the upper tension is a little tighter than the factory setting should be, or that the thread is hanging up somewhere....possibly a burr or a lint or a piece of thread somewhere, have you taken your top tension cover off to look?


Re: Mac Embroidery Software Recommendation

Kay Davis
 

I enjoy my Embrilliance software. I have Essentials, Alpha Tricks and Enthusiast. All the modules are standalone but work with each other as well. Great customer service, too. And there are lots of great you tube videos. I’ve had a few different software embroidery programs but this is awesome. And on my Mac it just works!

On Fri, Aug 7, 2020 at 11:40 AM Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Take a look at StitchBuddy. It was created for Janome machines, but also does conversions from the more popular formats. I like that it will send designs to your USB drive, clean up the hidden folders that Apple puts on the drive, and eject the drive, all in one operation. Very affordable! I'm not affiliated, but have a great deal of respect for the developer.


Re: Mac Embroidery Software Recommendation

Jim Stutsman
 

Take a look at StitchBuddy. It was created for Janome machines, but also does conversions from the more popular formats. I like that it will send designs to your USB drive, clean up the hidden folders that Apple puts on the drive, and eject the drive, all in one operation. Very affordable! I'm not affiliated, but have a great deal of respect for the developer.


Mac Embroidery Software Recommendation

Sharron Brittingham <brittisl1018@...>
 

I’m looking for a recommendation for an embroidery software I can use on a Mac. I recently did the free trial of Janome Artistic Designer and liked the software. I was very comfortable using the software but not with the price. I’m not sure how often I would use the software and did not want to spend that much on something I might not use often. 

What other embroidery software do y’all use?


Re: MC6500Pro foot

Cat - N
 

I looked in the FootBook app (love this app) on my iPhone and searched for elastic, and it shows:

Ribbon and Sequin Foot

Part #200332000: Fits all 7mm top-loading models.


Might help?


- Cat

Typos courtesy of autocorrect. 



On Aug 6, 2020 at 2:44 PM, <vicki J. Wardwell> wrote:

Looking to see if there is an elastic foot for my short shank Janome
Thank you in advance.
--
Vicki Jane Hull- Wardwell
_._,_._,_


MC6500Pro foot

vicki J. Wardwell <vjw_65@...>
 

Looking to see if there is an elastic foot for my short shank Janome
Thank you in advance.
--
Vicki Jane Hull- Wardwell


Re: AcuFil measurement changes

Pinguin
 

Working with metrics is much easier, because you work with what I call a 10-system.
1 meter = 10 decimeter=100 centimeter= 1000 millimeter.

With imperial it's much more complicated.
1 yard = 3 feet = 36 inches
And then you divide the inches in half, quarters, eights and sixteenths.
So 1 yard = 72 x 1/2" or 144 x 1/4" or 288 x 1/8" or 576 x 1/16"
And it becomes really complicated when you have to multiply or divide measurements as 2 3/4" or 11 5/16"

So for me metric is the most logical and efficient way to measure.

Gerda


Op 02-08-2020 om 21:59 schreef Tracy:

Jeanniett-

I know that using inches is "easier" if you have not gotten involved with using metric measurements - but I'd like to suggest not making the change and leaving your measurements as metric so you can learn and have an easier time in the future.

Here's why--  If you are having to move designs around, re-center them, enlarge/reduce size etc...  If you are using inch measurements - it's harder to determine what 1/2 would be if you are using 7/8" or 3/8" or 1-5/8" etc.  These types of measurements are harder to cut in half and then you end up with 8ths, 16ths, 32ndths of an inch etc.  But- if you are using metric and remember that 1in = 25mm, 1/2in = 12.5mm, 1/4in = 6mm, 1/8in = 3mm those 4 are the basis for being able to do most calculations using metrics.  They are the ones you would use the most with quilting and embroidery.  And once you start doing it pretty often, it comes naturally.  So- 7/8in = 21-21.5mm and I typically drop that .5mm because it's really *so* small.  (I added 12.5 + 6 + 3 = 21.5mm).  And- if it's a problem for you - you can make a chart and keep it handy so it's even easier.  But- here's the big thought... It's much easier to find the center of something that measures 21mm than it is 7/8" since you only cut 21 in half and come up with 10.5 (I round it to 10) so you can move something 10mm easier than you can stop to figure out what half of 7/8in is and then it's going to be off more when/if you round the # you get.  And- if you are like me, when I was doing inches... I would have to have a tape measure and then use it to determine where half would be.  Where's the tape measure when you need it??  To move a design 3/4in to the left (example) you would move it 18mm (1/2=12, 1/4=6mm).

Most digitizers use metrics for design sizes.  Some will list them with both measurements because they never know who might be buying their designs and don't want anyone to have to do the math (altho it's not hard for many....)  Most hoop sizes are listed in metric measurements so you can start from there.  If your hoop is 200x200 then you know center is 100mm going from the notches on each side of your hoop.  That's 4inches since you know that 25mm = 1in and 100mm divided by 25 is going to be 4.  But if your hoop is 5.5in x 7.9in (like one of mine) .... it's harder to figure out where center is by cutting those numbers in half than if you use 140mm x 197mm.  Cut both of the latter #s in half.  Newer Janome larger hoops that are 9.1in x 11in convert to 227mm x 275mm (the 12000, 15000, 14000 models machines) or the 550e has the 7.9 x 14in which converts to 197 x 350mm.  

Obviously, it's your choice.  This is just something to think about and my opinion... If you are moving designs around to group them, ungroup then center etc.... Metric makes it easier.  I really wish we had all grown up doing the metric system.  I didn't but have converted most of my measurements since becoming a nurse 40yrs ago, quilter 30yrs ago, and machine embroiderer 20yrs ago.

Tracy in Nashville, TN

Martha Pullen  Licensed Educator



Re: AcuFil measurement changes

Mary Almond
 

Thanks! I am going to work on this


Re: AcuFil measurement changes

Jeanniett Chicky
 

I think I will re-eduate myself and maybe even make it easier on my self….Thank you so very much for the information it truly was VERY helpful…

Jeanniett from Texas

 

From: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tracy
Sent: Sunday, August 2, 2020 3:00 PM
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Subject: Re: [onlinesewing-janome] AcuFil measurement changes

 

Jeanniett-

I know that using inches is "easier" if you have not gotten involved with using metric measurements - but I'd like to suggest not making the change and leaving your measurements as metric so you can learn and have an easier time in the future.

Here's why--  If you are having to move designs around, re-center them, enlarge/reduce size etc...  If you are using inch measurements - it's harder to determine what 1/2 would be if you are using 7/8" or 3/8" or 1-5/8" etc.  These types of measurements are harder to cut in half and then you end up with 8ths, 16ths, 32ndths of an inch etc.  But- if you are using metric and remember that 1in = 25mm, 1/2in = 12.5mm, 1/4in = 6mm, 1/8in = 3mm those 4 are the basis for being able to do most calculations using metrics.  They are the ones you would use the most with quilting and embroidery.  And once you start doing it pretty often, it comes naturally.  So- 7/8in = 21-21.5mm and I typically drop that .5mm because it's really *so* small.  (I added 12.5 + 6 + 3 = 21.5mm).  And- if it's a problem for you - you can make a chart and keep it handy so it's even easier.  But- here's the big thought... It's much easier to find the center of something that measures 21mm than it is 7/8" since you only cut 21 in half and come up with 10.5 (I round it to 10) so you can move something 10mm easier than you can stop to figure out what half of 7/8in is and then it's going to be off more when/if you round the # you get.  And- if you are like me, when I was doing inches... I would have to have a tape measure and then use it to determine where half would be.  Where's the tape measure when you need it??  To move a design 3/4in to the left (example) you would move it 18mm (1/2=12, 1/4=6mm).

Most digitizers use metrics for design sizes.  Some will list them with both measurements because they never know who might be buying their designs and don't want anyone to have to do the math (altho it's not hard for many....)  Most hoop sizes are listed in metric measurements so you can start from there.  If your hoop is 200x200 then you know center is 100mm going from the notches on each side of your hoop.  That's 4inches since you know that 25mm = 1in and 100mm divided by 25 is going to be 4.  But if your hoop is 5.5in x 7.9in (like one of mine) .... it's harder to figure out where center is by cutting those numbers in half than if you use 140mm x 197mm.  Cut both of the latter #s in half.  Newer Janome larger hoops that are 9.1in x 11in convert to 227mm x 275mm (the 12000, 15000, 14000 models machines) or the 550e has the 7.9 x 14in which converts to 197 x 350mm.  

Obviously, it's your choice.  This is just something to think about and my opinion... If you are moving designs around to group them, ungroup then center etc.... Metric makes it easier.  I really wish we had all grown up doing the metric system.  I didn't but have converted most of my measurements since becoming a nurse 40yrs ago, quilter 30yrs ago, and machine embroiderer 20yrs ago.

Tracy in Nashville, TN

Martha Pullen  Licensed Educator


Re: ruler foot

sewnice@...
 

thank you

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