Date   

Re: Inconsistent tension on 1500

Nyssa Lanzafame
 

Oops. The white piece I am referring to is actually under the bobbin holder ;)

On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 12:21 PM Nyssa Lanzafame via groups.io <Nyssajoe=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Did your friend look under the bobbin , is there any scratch or burr on white plate?  It is a very inexpensive part that is often overlooked. Thread getting caught on it can cause tension wonkiness, doesn’t get snagged and all is fine then suddenly the thread will drag and cause an issue sporadically 


Re: ruler foot

Nyssa Lanzafame
 

It may ‘fit’.  But the 11000se did not have a ruler foot, so this would be A 3rd party foot.  Sometimes those feet collide with the machine when the foot is lifted if the needle goes down.  I had a different machine and told myself “well i just won’t do that then”. Until 1 day I did by accident. And then the machine never worked the same and the cost of the service call to TRY to fix it was more than the cost of the ruler foot that Janome makes for the 14000.   The 14000 is such a nice machine I would save for the right foot, but that was a painful sad experience for me. 

On Tue, Aug 4, 2020 at 4:55 PM <sewnice@...> wrote:
Hi
 does any one know if a ruler foot bought for the Mc11000se will work for the MC 14000

thanks


Re: Inconsistent tension on 1500

blue_lak
 

You said it's skipping stitches. Are the "loops" really just long threads of skipped stitches, and not loops on the underside when embroidering? That can also be a foot pressure problem. I have a 12000 and notice that I often have to increase foot pressure if using 40 wt thread. Generally it's fine with 50 or 60 wt for piecing and sewing. I also have to adjust it sometimes if I'm using an odd needle. My usual is a Jeans #11 or Quilting #12. Another test she can try is to use the 1/4" flex foot for piecing and see if it still skips stitches. If the Flex foot doesn't skip with regular foot pressure but it does skip with the A foot, that's an indication of a foot pressure problem.


Re: Inconsistent tension on 1500

Mary Mills
 

Thanks to all who replied to my query.  My friend is going to replace her bobbin holder and hopefully sort her problem, regards Mary in Au


Re: ruler foot

valora hammond
 

They are both high shank machines so it should work. 


On Aug 4, 2020, at 2:55 PM, sewnice@... wrote:

Hi
 does any one know if a ruler foot bought for the Mc11000se will work for the MC 14000

thanks


ruler foot

sewnice@...
 

Hi
 does any one know if a ruler foot bought for the Mc11000se will work for the MC 14000

thanks


Re: Inconsistent tension on 1500

Nyssa Lanzafame
 

Did your friend look under the bobbin , is there any scratch or burr on white plate?  It is a very inexpensive part that is often overlooked. Thread getting caught on it can cause tension wonkiness, doesn’t get snagged and all is fine then suddenly the thread will drag and cause an issue sporadically 


Re: Inconsistent tension on 1500

Vikki Youngmeyer
 

I had some bobbins that “didn’t quite fit” my Janome machines. The thread colors were pretty and I didn’t want to throw them away. I got some empty bobbins from a Janome dealer and used the bobbin winder to wind the thread from the no-Janome bobbin onto the Janome bobbin. Then I threw the non-Janome bobbins away, so I wouldn’t use them by accident.

 

Vikki

Houston, TX


Re: Inconsistent tension on 1500

favymtz
 

Before I had a Janome I embroidered on another brand of machine for which I purchased a very large quantity of pre wound bobbins. They are too small for the Janome, so I just rewind them onto Janome bobbins.
Because factory wound bobbins have about 1/3 more thread on them than what we can wind, each bobbin fills about 1 1/2 Janome bobbins. I usually wind about 3/4 of the way then start a new one for the remaining thread so that I don’t have to change the bobbin so frequently.
 I also recommend that if prewounds are too full that they should be rewound onto another bobbin. The Janome black bobbins are notorious for being too full and causing problems, as well as the Superior prewounds.
 
--
Favymtz


Re: AcuFil measurement changes

Lyn Quine
 

I cannot work in metric at all, it just doesn’t work with my brain, I was taught Imperial at school, I use feet and inches in my quilting, although I have to buy fabric and thread in metres, but that’s fine.  I work on the basis that 10cms =4 inches.  10cms is 100mm is 4 inches all 3 are divisible and multiplied easily, I was taught my times tables the same as all British children in the 50s and 60s by chanting, and I can still chant them today they are ingrained in my head.  I’m not very good at mathematics, when my lovely quilting teacher starts talking about measurements and angles etc., she can see the shutters come down and I start to panic, because I just cannot and do not understand them.  


Re: Inconsistent tension on 1500

Suzanne Martin
 

Good point about the bobbins. I learned to use only Janome bobbins and as soon as I use up my spool of bobbin thread, I'll only buy pre wound bobbins!

Thank you!
Suzanne Martin, GRI
Associate Broker
Charles Rutenberg LLC
suzmar45@...
(407) 234-6906

On Mon, Aug 3, 2020, 12:49 PM Lyn Quine <lynquine@...> wrote:

I’ve never messed with the tension on the bobbin I achieve better tension by adjusting the top tension, then it goes back to default next time.  Bobbin tension has no default setting, once changed it’s difficult to get it back to where it was.  I found I needed to use the red bobbin case for embroidery when I used Janome prewound bobbins, when I use my own wound ones with non Janome thread  (but Janome bobbins), I need the yellow dot case.  The tension can be affected by using non Janome bobbins, the ones that are supposed to fit a variety of brands, they don’t fit Janome machines, they are smaller, and they bounce and clatter in the machine and that can affect the tension and quality of stitching.  I’m sad to say I did succumb to trying non Janome prewound bobbins, they are supposed to fit, but they don’t, they were a total waste of money as far as my machines were concerned, even my little 350e complained about them, the stitching was awful and they certainly shifted and bounced in the machine, and yet they were recommended for Janome machines, I gave them away to friends who have Brother machines, they seem to like them.  

 


Re: Inconsistent tension on 1500

Lyn Quine
 

I’ve never messed with the tension on the bobbin I achieve better tension by adjusting the top tension, then it goes back to default next time.  Bobbin tension has no default setting, once changed it’s difficult to get it back to where it was.  I found I needed to use the red bobbin case for embroidery when I used Janome prewound bobbins, when I use my own wound ones with non Janome thread  (but Janome bobbins), I need the yellow dot case.  The tension can be affected by using non Janome bobbins, the ones that are supposed to fit a variety of brands, they don’t fit Janome machines, they are smaller, and they bounce and clatter in the machine and that can affect the tension and quality of stitching.  I’m sad to say I did succumb to trying non Janome prewound bobbins, they are supposed to fit, but they don’t, they were a total waste of money as far as my machines were concerned, even my little 350e complained about them, the stitching was awful and they certainly shifted and bounced in the machine, and yet they were recommended for Janome machines, I gave them away to friends who have Brother machines, they seem to like them.  

 


Re: Inconsistent tension on 1500

Suzanne Martin
 

Virginia, 
You are so right!  I messed with the screws on my yellow bobbin trying to fix tension problems.  From the very beginning I had tension trouble but now I realize it was me not understanding the machine. 

Finally purchased a new yellow dot bobbin which I don't mess with and it works fine.  Hopefully the settings stay secure and don't change due to vibration. 

I have found for some embroidery designs the red dot bobbin works better.  I have switched out the bobbins in the middle of a design.

The most important thing to check is proper threading of the top thread.

Thank you!
Suzanne Martin, GRI
Associate Broker
Charles Rutenberg LLC
suzmar45@...
(407) 234-6906


On Mon, Aug 3, 2020, 11:34 AM Virginia via groups.io <Fmjfrazier=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
I have been a Janome owner since 1996 and have the 15,000 upgraded to the QCP. One thing I was taught and learned over the years is that Janome machines are set at the factory for the tensions that are correct for the machines. And if we have an issue with the tensions that it is the dealers responsibility to correct it.  I too had this issue at the beginning of 202 and my dealer replaced the entire bobbin assembly and it took 7 weeks for the part but it was worth it.  Once you start playing with the tensions other than what is in the manual you will never get it corrected. To be sure always use the red dot bobbin case for repalr sewing, piecing etc, and the yellow dot bobbin case fort embroidery. There are times that we do have issues with skipping etc, however many times it is the thread we are using, and just like people with foods we all do not like the same thing and with machines not all machines do well with different brands of thread.  Your friend should contact her dealer as the Janome 15.000 is warranted for 5 years after purchase to original owner and take in a sample for him to see.  You mentioned she is doing piecing, hopefully she is in the correct module for the application (the little shirt on the machine) shows the different modules and one is for piecing to get the best results..

Virginia


-----Original Message-----
From: Mary Mills <mary.mills81@...>
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Sent: Mon, Aug 3, 2020 8:18 am
Subject: [onlinesewing-janome] Inconsistent tension on 1500

Hi everyone, hope you’re all keeping safe with this dreadful virus that is sweeping the world.   I have a friend in the US who has a Janome 15000 with inconsistent tension and skipped stitching.  She has tried every needle going to no avail, does not matter what fabric she is using or the thickness, the machine plays up on her.  She has been sewing for many years, mostly with Janome so she knows what she’s doing.  She said she is sick of continuously having to adjust the bobbin tension to avoid loops in the sewing.  At the moment she’s sewing 2 1/2” squares into place mats for the homeless and the machine keeps skipping stitches.  Any suggestions would be appreciated.  P.S.  she gets the machine serviced regularly.  Thanks and regards, Mary Mills in Au


Re: Inconsistent tension on 1500

Virginia
 

I have been a Janome owner since 1996 and have the 15,000 upgraded to the QCP. One thing I was taught and learned over the years is that Janome machines are set at the factory for the tensions that are correct for the machines. And if we have an issue with the tensions that it is the dealers responsibility to correct it.  I too had this issue at the beginning of 202 and my dealer replaced the entire bobbin assembly and it took 7 weeks for the part but it was worth it.  Once you start playing with the tensions other than what is in the manual you will never get it corrected. To be sure always use the red dot bobbin case for repalr sewing, piecing etc, and the yellow dot bobbin case fort embroidery. There are times that we do have issues with skipping etc, however many times it is the thread we are using, and just like people with foods we all do not like the same thing and with machines not all machines do well with different brands of thread.  Your friend should contact her dealer as the Janome 15.000 is warranted for 5 years after purchase to original owner and take in a sample for him to see.  You mentioned she is doing piecing, hopefully she is in the correct module for the application (the little shirt on the machine) shows the different modules and one is for piecing to get the best results..

Virginia


-----Original Message-----
From: Mary Mills <mary.mills81@...>
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Sent: Mon, Aug 3, 2020 8:18 am
Subject: [onlinesewing-janome] Inconsistent tension on 1500

Hi everyone, hope you’re all keeping safe with this dreadful virus that is sweeping the world.   I have a friend in the US who has a Janome 15000 with inconsistent tension and skipped stitching.  She has tried every needle going to no avail, does not matter what fabric she is using or the thickness, the machine plays up on her.  She has been sewing for many years, mostly with Janome so she knows what she’s doing.  She said she is sick of continuously having to adjust the bobbin tension to avoid loops in the sewing.  At the moment she’s sewing 2 1/2” squares into place mats for the homeless and the machine keeps skipping stitches.  Any suggestions would be appreciated.  P.S.  she gets the machine serviced regularly.  Thanks and regards, Mary Mills in Au


Re: AcuFil measurement changes

valora hammond
 

When I teach I usually use money as the comparison.  1”=a quarter (25 cents). And a millimeter=a penny.  So if your hoop is 200mm x200mm how many quarters do you need to make $2.00.  
If you have centimeters it is just another 0 on the end to get millimeters. 
And splitting mm in half us much easier. A design is 3.75”. What is half of that other then a headache. That same design is 80mm. You would need half of the design if putting it above a pocket and needed to know center if the design for placement. 


On Aug 3, 2020, at 6:13 AM, Kim Normandin <Knormandin2@...> wrote:

Tracy,
Thank you so much for that perspective!  I always thought of metrics as difficult (obviously only because I didn’t know that system). Think I will do a little studying up😊

Kim


On Aug 2, 2020, at 5:01 PM, Tracy <TJOriginals@...> wrote:



Jeanniett-

I know that using inches is "easier" if you have not gotten involved with using metric measurements - but I'd like to suggest not making the change and leaving your measurements as metric so you can learn and have an easier time in the future.

Here's why--  If you are having to move designs around, re-center them, enlarge/reduce size etc...  If you are using inch measurements - it's harder to determine what 1/2 would be if you are using 7/8" or 3/8" or 1-5/8" etc.  These types of measurements are harder to cut in half and then you end up with 8ths, 16ths, 32ndths of an inch etc.  But- if you are using metric and remember that 1in = 25mm, 1/2in = 12.5mm, 1/4in = 6mm, 1/8in = 3mm those 4 are the basis for being able to do most calculations using metrics.  They are the ones you would use the most with quilting and embroidery.  And once you start doing it pretty often, it comes naturally.  So- 7/8in = 21-21.5mm and I typically drop that .5mm because it's really *so* small.  (I added 12.5 + 6 + 3 = 21.5mm).  And- if it's a problem for you - you can make a chart and keep it handy so it's even easier.  But- here's the big thought... It's much easier to find the center of something that measures 21mm than it is 7/8" since you only cut 21 in half and come up with 10.5 (I round it to 10) so you can move something 10mm easier than you can stop to figure out what half of 7/8in is and then it's going to be off more when/if you round the # you get.  And- if you are like me, when I was doing inches... I would have to have a tape measure and then use it to determine where half would be.  Where's the tape measure when you need it??  To move a design 3/4in to the left (example) you would move it 18mm (1/2=12, 1/4=6mm).

Most digitizers use metrics for design sizes.  Some will list them with both measurements because they never know who might be buying their designs and don't want anyone to have to do the math (altho it's not hard for many....)  Most hoop sizes are listed in metric measurements so you can start from there.  If your hoop is 200x200 then you know center is 100mm going from the notches on each side of your hoop.  That's 4inches since you know that 25mm = 1in and 100mm divided by 25 is going to be 4.  But if your hoop is 5.5in x 7.9in (like one of mine) .... it's harder to figure out where center is by cutting those numbers in half than if you use 140mm x 197mm.  Cut both of the latter #s in half.  Newer Janome larger hoops that are 9.1in x 11in convert to 227mm x 275mm (the 12000, 15000, 14000 models machines) or the 550e has the 7.9 x 14in which converts to 197 x 350mm.  

Obviously, it's your choice.  This is just something to think about and my opinion... If you are moving designs around to group them, ungroup then center etc.... Metric makes it easier.  I really wish we had all grown up doing the metric system.  I didn't but have converted most of my measurements since becoming a nurse 40yrs ago, quilter 30yrs ago, and machine embroiderer 20yrs ago.

Tracy in Nashville, TN

Martha Pullen  Licensed Educator


Inconsistent tension on 1500

Mary Mills
 

Hi everyone, hope you’re all keeping safe with this dreadful virus that is sweeping the world.   I have a friend in the US who has a Janome 15000 with inconsistent tension and skipped stitching.  She has tried every needle going to no avail, does not matter what fabric she is using or the thickness, the machine plays up on her.  She has been sewing for many years, mostly with Janome so she knows what she’s doing.  She said she is sick of continuously having to adjust the bobbin tension to avoid loops in the sewing.  At the moment she’s sewing 2 1/2” squares into place mats for the homeless and the machine keeps skipping stitches.  Any suggestions would be appreciated.  P.S.  she gets the machine serviced regularly.  Thanks and regards, Mary Mills in Au


Re: AcuFil measurement changes

Kim Normandin
 

Tracy,
Thank you so much for that perspective!  I always thought of metrics as difficult (obviously only because I didn’t know that system). Think I will do a little studying up😊

Kim


On Aug 2, 2020, at 5:01 PM, Tracy <TJOriginals@...> wrote:



Jeanniett-

I know that using inches is "easier" if you have not gotten involved with using metric measurements - but I'd like to suggest not making the change and leaving your measurements as metric so you can learn and have an easier time in the future.

Here's why--  If you are having to move designs around, re-center them, enlarge/reduce size etc...  If you are using inch measurements - it's harder to determine what 1/2 would be if you are using 7/8" or 3/8" or 1-5/8" etc.  These types of measurements are harder to cut in half and then you end up with 8ths, 16ths, 32ndths of an inch etc.  But- if you are using metric and remember that 1in = 25mm, 1/2in = 12.5mm, 1/4in = 6mm, 1/8in = 3mm those 4 are the basis for being able to do most calculations using metrics.  They are the ones you would use the most with quilting and embroidery.  And once you start doing it pretty often, it comes naturally.  So- 7/8in = 21-21.5mm and I typically drop that .5mm because it's really *so* small.  (I added 12.5 + 6 + 3 = 21.5mm).  And- if it's a problem for you - you can make a chart and keep it handy so it's even easier.  But- here's the big thought... It's much easier to find the center of something that measures 21mm than it is 7/8" since you only cut 21 in half and come up with 10.5 (I round it to 10) so you can move something 10mm easier than you can stop to figure out what half of 7/8in is and then it's going to be off more when/if you round the # you get.  And- if you are like me, when I was doing inches... I would have to have a tape measure and then use it to determine where half would be.  Where's the tape measure when you need it??  To move a design 3/4in to the left (example) you would move it 18mm (1/2=12, 1/4=6mm).

Most digitizers use metrics for design sizes.  Some will list them with both measurements because they never know who might be buying their designs and don't want anyone to have to do the math (altho it's not hard for many....)  Most hoop sizes are listed in metric measurements so you can start from there.  If your hoop is 200x200 then you know center is 100mm going from the notches on each side of your hoop.  That's 4inches since you know that 25mm = 1in and 100mm divided by 25 is going to be 4.  But if your hoop is 5.5in x 7.9in (like one of mine) .... it's harder to figure out where center is by cutting those numbers in half than if you use 140mm x 197mm.  Cut both of the latter #s in half.  Newer Janome larger hoops that are 9.1in x 11in convert to 227mm x 275mm (the 12000, 15000, 14000 models machines) or the 550e has the 7.9 x 14in which converts to 197 x 350mm.  

Obviously, it's your choice.  This is just something to think about and my opinion... If you are moving designs around to group them, ungroup then center etc.... Metric makes it easier.  I really wish we had all grown up doing the metric system.  I didn't but have converted most of my measurements since becoming a nurse 40yrs ago, quilter 30yrs ago, and machine embroiderer 20yrs ago.

Tracy in Nashville, TN

Martha Pullen  Licensed Educator


Re: AcuFil measurement changes

Lucy Fino
 

Tracy, thank you!  That’s a lot to take in at one sitting but I’m going to take small bites!  Have a blessed day!

Sent from Lucy's iPhone

On Aug 2, 2020, at 4:01 PM, Tracy <TJOriginals@...> wrote:



Jeanniett-

I know that using inches is "easier" if you have not gotten involved with using metric measurements - but I'd like to suggest not making the change and leaving your measurements as metric so you can learn and have an easier time in the future.

Here's why--  If you are having to move designs around, re-center them, enlarge/reduce size etc...  If you are using inch measurements - it's harder to determine what 1/2 would be if you are using 7/8" or 3/8" or 1-5/8" etc.  These types of measurements are harder to cut in half and then you end up with 8ths, 16ths, 32ndths of an inch etc.  But- if you are using metric and remember that 1in = 25mm, 1/2in = 12.5mm, 1/4in = 6mm, 1/8in = 3mm those 4 are the basis for being able to do most calculations using metrics.  They are the ones you would use the most with quilting and embroidery.  And once you start doing it pretty often, it comes naturally.  So- 7/8in = 21-21.5mm and I typically drop that .5mm because it's really *so* small.  (I added 12.5 + 6 + 3 = 21.5mm).  And- if it's a problem for you - you can make a chart and keep it handy so it's even easier.  But- here's the big thought... It's much easier to find the center of something that measures 21mm than it is 7/8" since you only cut 21 in half and come up with 10.5 (I round it to 10) so you can move something 10mm easier than you can stop to figure out what half of 7/8in is and then it's going to be off more when/if you round the # you get.  And- if you are like me, when I was doing inches... I would have to have a tape measure and then use it to determine where half would be.  Where's the tape measure when you need it??  To move a design 3/4in to the left (example) you would move it 18mm (1/2=12, 1/4=6mm).

Most digitizers use metrics for design sizes.  Some will list them with both measurements because they never know who might be buying their designs and don't want anyone to have to do the math (altho it's not hard for many....)  Most hoop sizes are listed in metric measurements so you can start from there.  If your hoop is 200x200 then you know center is 100mm going from the notches on each side of your hoop.  That's 4inches since you know that 25mm = 1in and 100mm divided by 25 is going to be 4.  But if your hoop is 5.5in x 7.9in (like one of mine) .... it's harder to figure out where center is by cutting those numbers in half than if you use 140mm x 197mm.  Cut both of the latter #s in half.  Newer Janome larger hoops that are 9.1in x 11in convert to 227mm x 275mm (the 12000, 15000, 14000 models machines) or the 550e has the 7.9 x 14in which converts to 197 x 350mm.  

Obviously, it's your choice.  This is just something to think about and my opinion... If you are moving designs around to group them, ungroup then center etc.... Metric makes it easier.  I really wish we had all grown up doing the metric system.  I didn't but have converted most of my measurements since becoming a nurse 40yrs ago, quilter 30yrs ago, and machine embroiderer 20yrs ago.

Tracy in Nashville, TN

Martha Pullen  Licensed Educator


Re: AcuFil measurement changes

Tracy
 

Jeanniett-

I know that using inches is "easier" if you have not gotten involved with using metric measurements - but I'd like to suggest not making the change and leaving your measurements as metric so you can learn and have an easier time in the future.

Here's why--  If you are having to move designs around, re-center them, enlarge/reduce size etc...  If you are using inch measurements - it's harder to determine what 1/2 would be if you are using 7/8" or 3/8" or 1-5/8" etc.  These types of measurements are harder to cut in half and then you end up with 8ths, 16ths, 32ndths of an inch etc.  But- if you are using metric and remember that 1in = 25mm, 1/2in = 12.5mm, 1/4in = 6mm, 1/8in = 3mm those 4 are the basis for being able to do most calculations using metrics.  They are the ones you would use the most with quilting and embroidery.  And once you start doing it pretty often, it comes naturally.  So- 7/8in = 21-21.5mm and I typically drop that .5mm because it's really *so* small.  (I added 12.5 + 6 + 3 = 21.5mm).  And- if it's a problem for you - you can make a chart and keep it handy so it's even easier.  But- here's the big thought... It's much easier to find the center of something that measures 21mm than it is 7/8" since you only cut 21 in half and come up with 10.5 (I round it to 10) so you can move something 10mm easier than you can stop to figure out what half of 7/8in is and then it's going to be off more when/if you round the # you get.  And- if you are like me, when I was doing inches... I would have to have a tape measure and then use it to determine where half would be.  Where's the tape measure when you need it??  To move a design 3/4in to the left (example) you would move it 18mm (1/2=12, 1/4=6mm).

Most digitizers use metrics for design sizes.  Some will list them with both measurements because they never know who might be buying their designs and don't want anyone to have to do the math (altho it's not hard for many....)  Most hoop sizes are listed in metric measurements so you can start from there.  If your hoop is 200x200 then you know center is 100mm going from the notches on each side of your hoop.  That's 4inches since you know that 25mm = 1in and 100mm divided by 25 is going to be 4.  But if your hoop is 5.5in x 7.9in (like one of mine) .... it's harder to figure out where center is by cutting those numbers in half than if you use 140mm x 197mm.  Cut both of the latter #s in half.  Newer Janome larger hoops that are 9.1in x 11in convert to 227mm x 275mm (the 12000, 15000, 14000 models machines) or the 550e has the 7.9 x 14in which converts to 197 x 350mm.  

Obviously, it's your choice.  This is just something to think about and my opinion... If you are moving designs around to group them, ungroup then center etc.... Metric makes it easier.  I really wish we had all grown up doing the metric system.  I didn't but have converted most of my measurements since becoming a nurse 40yrs ago, quilter 30yrs ago, and machine embroiderer 20yrs ago.

Tracy in Nashville, TN

Martha Pullen  Licensed Educator


Re: AcuFil measurement changes

Jeanniett Chicky
 

To my Janome Angel,

Thank you so very much…..

 

From: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io> On Behalf Of valora hammond via groups.io
Sent: Friday, July 31, 2020 9:38 PM
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Subject: Re: [onlinesewing-janome] AcuFil measurement changes

 

Under where file usually is.  It should drop down for measurements 



On Jul 31, 2020, at 7:27 PM, Jeanniett Chicky <jmchicky@...> wrote:

My project is to quilt individual squares on a child's quilt and I am trying to change the measurement from "MM" to "Inches".  I am working with the new Workbook Manual. I selected the AcuFil Tool in HLS but can not find a way to change the measurement type as shown on pg 197.  I have been able to change via Settings in the regular sewing and the embroidery selections but cannot change the AcuFil designs.  Thank you in advance from Texas.

1921 - 1940 of 29101