Date   

Re: Puckers in embroidery

favymtz
 

Fusible No Show Mesh: I do the same thing, pre-shrink it! Obviously you don't touch the fusible side with the iron, if you pre-shrink by blasting it with steam. My preferred method is to soak it in very warm water.
Actually I only buy fusible, it's a more versatile product, Fuse if you need it, don't fuse if you don't want to fuse.

--
Favymtz


Re: printing a recipe?

Wellwood
 

Here is a video that Jennifer Tryon did of taking a photo with iPad and then moving it into AcuEdit to trace over the original recipe with the open. You can then export it to your machine using wifi. It may have been on the Janome Classroom or Janome sewing.
Jean

   Sent from my iPad

On Jul 27, 2020, at 11:04 AM, sewnice@... wrote:

I made a "this is me" quilt for both my grandsons.  I used a product called printable treasures, a printable fabric.  Lots of brands to choose from,  they are sheets of fabric 8x10" that can go through your printer.  The only thing I recommend after your image has printed, rinse very well with cold water . Lay flat to dry

hope this helps
Sharon


Re: printing a recipe?

Mary Jo Hirsch
 

Suggest using electric quilt fabric. It lasts and lasts

On Mon, Jul 27, 2020 at 1:04 PM <sewnice@...> wrote:
I made a "this is me" quilt for both my grandsons.  I used a product called printable treasures, a printable fabric.  Lots of brands to choose from,  they are sheets of fabric 8x10" that can go through your printer.  The only thing I recommend after your image has printed, rinse very well with cold water . Lay flat to dry

hope this helps
Sharon

--
null


Re: printing a recipe?

sewnice@...
 

I made a "this is me" quilt for both my grandsons.  I used a product called printable treasures, a printable fabric.  Lots of brands to choose from,  they are sheets of fabric 8x10" that can go through your printer.  The only thing I recommend after your image has printed, rinse very well with cold water . Lay flat to dry

hope this helps
Sharon


Re: Puckers in embroidery

Roberta K
 

Fave:

Are you suggesting that wash-away stabilizer can be used on t-shirts? I assume that you are referring to the printable type? What brand do you use?


Roberta in FL


Re: Puckers in embroidery

Roberta K
 

Favymtz:

I heartily agree with you about no-show mesh stabilizer. When I first started using it, which was mostly on t-shirts, I would always get puckers around my embroidery after washing the completed item. I always thought it was my error.

However, when I finally discovered the problem and changed my preparation for hooping by pre-shrinking the stabilizer, the problem was solved.

I would like to know how you deal with fusible no-show mesh?

Thanks in advance,
Roberta in FL


Re: printing a recipe?

Cat - N
 

Hi,

I can think of several ways to get a recipe to 'appear' on a fabric kitchen towel such as embroidery, heat transfer, and screen printing (professionally done perhaps). 

I have not looked for it in many years, but there used to be a print transfer material you could send through your printer, print on it, then iron the 'design/print' onto a fabric surface. 

I did this back in the late 1990's to make matching t-shirts for a 'company required bowling team' of which I 'became' the 'captain' by reason of...no one else lifted a finger to help...LOL...so could not refer you to a specific product.  That material would start to 'disappear' after repeated washings...not sure about anything available today, if it still exists.

Good luck!

- Cat



-----Original Message-----
From: Joyce Daniel <mdaniel@...>
To: 12000GRP <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Jul 26, 2020 1:49 pm
Subject: [onlinesewing-janome] printing a recipe?

In an email/blog/etc. I got info on how to take a recipe, etc. and print it on a piece of fabric/kitchen towel/etc.
Did anyone else get this info or know how to do this? Our DIL just threw out that she had her grandmother’s recipe and thought it would be neat to have it “printed” for her sister and mom. I’d love to be able to do this for her.
Help??
Joyce in Ga
 
 


Re: printing a recipe?

 

My writting in english is not good but I hope you may understand. 

Just press with low heat  a sheet of fusible paper to the piece of fabric in which you want to print, it is recommended a soft cotton fabric. Once you have this, tape the corners of the prepared fabric to a sheet of A4 bond paper and place it face down in your printer. Then set you printing options to Optimus and print. 
Saludos

El domingo, julio 26, 2020, 1:09 p.m., Joyce Daniel <mdaniel@...> escribió:

In an email/blog/etc. I got info on how to take a recipe, etc. and print it on a piece of fabric/kitchen towel/etc.

Did anyone else get this info or know how to do this? Our DIL just threw out that she had her grandmother’s recipe and thought it would be neat to have it “printed” for her sister and mom. I’d love to be able to do this for her.

Help??

Joyce in Ga

 

 

“All you have shall some day be given;

Therefore, give now, that the season

of giving may be yours, and not

of your inheritors.”

Kahill Gibran

 

“Give” is my favorite 4-letter word

 


printing a recipe?

Joyce Daniel
 

In an email/blog/etc. I got info on how to take a recipe, etc. and print it on a piece of fabric/kitchen towel/etc.

Did anyone else get this info or know how to do this? Our DIL just threw out that she had her grandmother’s recipe and thought it would be neat to have it “printed” for her sister and mom. I’d love to be able to do this for her.

Help??

Joyce in Ga

 

 

“All you have shall some day be given;

Therefore, give now, that the season

of giving may be yours, and not

of your inheritors.”

Kahill Gibran

 

“Give” is my favorite 4-letter word

 


Re: Puckers in embroidery

Lou Ann
 

I think Favy's advice is spot on.  I'll add my two cents.  I'm impatient and didn't like waiting for the soaking-in time. To force a quick-dry, I press with a thin sheet of Teflon (used just like a pressing cloth) after a heavy spray of Terial Magic. I know these Teflon materials are sold as pressing cloths in specialty sewing stores, but I bought a cheaper version that works just fine in the kitchen section (probably Walmart or Amazon-can't remember) and it's intended purpose is to line the bottom of ovens!  I'll use 1 or 2 repeats of Terial Magic and it makes even thin cloth stiffen like a sheet of heavy paper.  I was able to snag a couple of one-gallon containers of this from my local dealer because the crate he received had damaged the containers-not to the point of leakage but he wasn't unable to sell them at full price.  $10 a gallon I thought was too good of a price to pass up!  Having a bunch on hand prevents me from being too stingy with the stuff:)


Re: How to choose the correct gauge of thread according to your needle

Patricia Ward
 

Isn't that interesting...  wish I were fluent in Spanish...   but it looks like an excellent way to test if you are in doubt about the needle size for the thread.  That will help when choosing threads for quilting.  

Thank you, Jim and thank you to the list member who sent you the link. 

Pat 

On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 9:10 PM Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Somehow it got filtered out - fixed now.


Re: File called MAC OSX

Lyn Quine
 

Thanks Jim that makes sense now.  I think I have some more tidying up to do in my files.  


Re: How to choose the correct gauge of thread according to your needle

Ceil J
 

Great!  Thank you for this video.  Also this is going to be a fun way to pair up needles and threads.


On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 9:08 PM Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

This helpful video link was sent by one of our international members. She found it very helpful in avoiding skipped stitches or broken needles. I haven't seen this information in any of the videos that commonly float around the sewing web. It's short, to the point, and really helpful. Thanks MaEmilia!

For those not fluent in Spanish (that would be me), the title of the video is the title of this post. It starts with pointing out industrial needles vs. household needles. Next is 3 weights of thread to demonstrate how to check against needle size.

Test 1 - Correct gauge
Pass the thread through the eye of the needle you are going to use. Turn the needle and hold the thread vertically. The needle should go down rotating continuously and evenly.

Test 2 - Very thick thread
Repeat the previous step with the thread you will use. Very thick thread gauge = needle getting stuck. This can cause needle breakage or damage to your machine.

Test 3 - Very thin thread
Very thin thread gauge = needle that slips and falls. This can cause constant thread breakage.


Re: How to choose the correct gauge of thread according to your needle

Jim Stutsman
 

Somehow it got filtered out - fixed now.


Re: Puckers in embroidery

 

Placing a piece or pieces of additional stabilzer beneath the hooped item, between the hoop and needle plate provides additional support and avoids puckering when embroidering.


Enviado desde Yahoo Mail para iPad

El jueves, julio 23, 2020, 11:32 a.m., Kay Davis <kaquilt@...> escribió:

How do you “stiffen the fabric”?  Or do the stabilizers do that?

On Thu, Jul 23, 2020 at 10:06 AM favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:
Pixey, yes it does stay stable after pre shrinking it. However, I find that it's still rather sensitive to heat, so be careful what it's used on. 
Over the years I discovered that I don't like it much except for on items that won't see an iron! It's often recommended for t-shirts and other clothing, but I was never really thrilled with the results.
My experience is that I do this with clothing: I stiffen up the fabric real good and use either a Tear Away or a Wash Away. And because I digitize I often-times will either create my own designs or alter a purchased design to assure that it isn't too stitch dense for the fabric/clothing. I like my embroidered clothing to maintain a nice drape and not be stiff behind the embroidery.
For items that don't need to be drapey, I will fuse on a lightweight interfacing product as has been mentioned by Jane and Patricia in this conversation. (Shape Flex, Knit Fuse, etc.)
One other thing that I try to remember is what our old friend and master digitizer Maggie Cooper used to say, "If it needs more than one layer of stabilizer, there's something wrong with the digitizing!"
Remember that if you're embroidering clothing, and you have 2 or more layers of TearAway stabilizer under the stitches, those stitches live there forever, making the garment stiff. 
I once purchased a beautiful embroidered dress from a high end store. I knew nothing about machine embroidery at the time but realize now that the stabilizer was a PolyMesh. I assumed that with washing the embroidered area would soften up. It never did. I even trimmed out as much of the PolyMesh as I could, but to no avail. It was an expensive lesson, but one that in years to come helped me to discern a better use of stabilizers!
Favymtz

--
Favymtz 


Re: How to choose the correct gauge of thread according to your needle

Ceil J
 

Jim,
Video link?  I cannot find it.  Thanks.


Re: File called MAC OSX

Jim Stutsman
 

Like Windows, macOS has the capability of making Zip files to hold designs. However macOS keeps more information (aka metadata) about individual files and that information gets embedded in the archive. This can create confusion when a zip file is created on a Mac and subsequently opened in Windows. You can safely delete those files, as they have no practical use in Windows.

Properties are also metadata, or extra information about files. For example, if a zip file is made from individual files on a CD-ROM they have a “read-only” property because a CD-ROM is by design read-only. If you keep the read-only property when you copy the file you may run into trouble later if you try to delete it. Early versions of Digitizer would sometimes refuse to open files with a read-only property, stating that they were copyrighted. I suppose that came from the idea that something read from a CD was created by someone else, and therefore must be copyrighted. In any case, you don’t need to worry about copying properties. When you copy a design using software, such as Horizon Link Suite, the software is ignoring the properties because they are not relevant to the task. When you drag and drop you’re working at a lower level, and Windows wants to know more about how you want the copy to take place. You can safely ignore the properties, especially with designs since there is nothing in them that the machine needs.


File called MAC OSX

Lyn Quine
 

Message for Jim

sometimes when I download from a website there is a folder in the zipped folder Called _MAC_OSX (Maybe OSC) inside the folder there’s what looks like duplicate files of the designs, but they are non embroidery files.  They don’t open, are they important can I delete them.  


another question, why do I sometimes get a message asking me if I want to transfer a design without its properties, usually when I drag and drop, or copy, but if I do it “properly” in software I don’t get that message, am I doing something wrong? 


thank you I did try and search the database but I didn’t get any hits. 


How to choose the correct gauge of thread according to your needle

Jim Stutsman
 
Edited

This helpful video link was sent by one of our international members. She found it very helpful in avoiding skipped stitches or broken needles. I haven't seen this information in any of the videos that commonly float around the sewing web. It's short, to the point, and really helpful. Thanks MaEmilia!

For those not fluent in Spanish (that would be me), the title of the video is the title of this post. It starts with pointing out industrial needles vs. household needles. Next is 3 weights of thread to demonstrate how to check against needle size.

Test 1 - Correct gauge
Pass the thread through the eye of the needle you are going to use. Turn the needle and hold the thread vertically. The needle should go down rotating continuously and evenly.

Test 2 - Very thick thread
Repeat the previous step with the thread you will use. Very thick thread gauge = needle getting stuck. This can cause needle breakage or damage to your machine.

Test 3 - Very thin thread
Very thin thread gauge = needle that slips and falls. This can cause constant thread breakage.


Re: How Would You Do This?

vicki J. Wardwell <vjw_65@...>
 

Only do the word on one layer the front fabric heavy wash-away stabilizer Do not stitch the center placement dot.
--
Vicki Jane Hull- Wardwell

2621 - 2640 of 29746