Date   

Re: How to choose the correct gauge of thread according to your needle

Ceil J
 

Great!  Thank you for this video.  Also this is going to be a fun way to pair up needles and threads.


On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 9:08 PM Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

This helpful video link was sent by one of our international members. She found it very helpful in avoiding skipped stitches or broken needles. I haven't seen this information in any of the videos that commonly float around the sewing web. It's short, to the point, and really helpful. Thanks MaEmilia!

For those not fluent in Spanish (that would be me), the title of the video is the title of this post. It starts with pointing out industrial needles vs. household needles. Next is 3 weights of thread to demonstrate how to check against needle size.

Test 1 - Correct gauge
Pass the thread through the eye of the needle you are going to use. Turn the needle and hold the thread vertically. The needle should go down rotating continuously and evenly.

Test 2 - Very thick thread
Repeat the previous step with the thread you will use. Very thick thread gauge = needle getting stuck. This can cause needle breakage or damage to your machine.

Test 3 - Very thin thread
Very thin thread gauge = needle that slips and falls. This can cause constant thread breakage.


Re: How to choose the correct gauge of thread according to your needle

Jim Stutsman
 

Somehow it got filtered out - fixed now.


Re: Puckers in embroidery

 

Placing a piece or pieces of additional stabilzer beneath the hooped item, between the hoop and needle plate provides additional support and avoids puckering when embroidering.


Enviado desde Yahoo Mail para iPad

El jueves, julio 23, 2020, 11:32 a.m., Kay Davis <kaquilt@...> escribió:

How do you “stiffen the fabric”?  Or do the stabilizers do that?

On Thu, Jul 23, 2020 at 10:06 AM favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:
Pixey, yes it does stay stable after pre shrinking it. However, I find that it's still rather sensitive to heat, so be careful what it's used on. 
Over the years I discovered that I don't like it much except for on items that won't see an iron! It's often recommended for t-shirts and other clothing, but I was never really thrilled with the results.
My experience is that I do this with clothing: I stiffen up the fabric real good and use either a Tear Away or a Wash Away. And because I digitize I often-times will either create my own designs or alter a purchased design to assure that it isn't too stitch dense for the fabric/clothing. I like my embroidered clothing to maintain a nice drape and not be stiff behind the embroidery.
For items that don't need to be drapey, I will fuse on a lightweight interfacing product as has been mentioned by Jane and Patricia in this conversation. (Shape Flex, Knit Fuse, etc.)
One other thing that I try to remember is what our old friend and master digitizer Maggie Cooper used to say, "If it needs more than one layer of stabilizer, there's something wrong with the digitizing!"
Remember that if you're embroidering clothing, and you have 2 or more layers of TearAway stabilizer under the stitches, those stitches live there forever, making the garment stiff. 
I once purchased a beautiful embroidered dress from a high end store. I knew nothing about machine embroidery at the time but realize now that the stabilizer was a PolyMesh. I assumed that with washing the embroidered area would soften up. It never did. I even trimmed out as much of the PolyMesh as I could, but to no avail. It was an expensive lesson, but one that in years to come helped me to discern a better use of stabilizers!
Favymtz

--
Favymtz 


Re: How to choose the correct gauge of thread according to your needle

Ceil J
 

Jim,
Video link?  I cannot find it.  Thanks.


Re: File called MAC OSX

Jim Stutsman
 

Like Windows, macOS has the capability of making Zip files to hold designs. However macOS keeps more information (aka metadata) about individual files and that information gets embedded in the archive. This can create confusion when a zip file is created on a Mac and subsequently opened in Windows. You can safely delete those files, as they have no practical use in Windows.

Properties are also metadata, or extra information about files. For example, if a zip file is made from individual files on a CD-ROM they have a “read-only” property because a CD-ROM is by design read-only. If you keep the read-only property when you copy the file you may run into trouble later if you try to delete it. Early versions of Digitizer would sometimes refuse to open files with a read-only property, stating that they were copyrighted. I suppose that came from the idea that something read from a CD was created by someone else, and therefore must be copyrighted. In any case, you don’t need to worry about copying properties. When you copy a design using software, such as Horizon Link Suite, the software is ignoring the properties because they are not relevant to the task. When you drag and drop you’re working at a lower level, and Windows wants to know more about how you want the copy to take place. You can safely ignore the properties, especially with designs since there is nothing in them that the machine needs.


File called MAC OSX

Lyn Quine
 

Message for Jim

sometimes when I download from a website there is a folder in the zipped folder Called _MAC_OSX (Maybe OSC) inside the folder there’s what looks like duplicate files of the designs, but they are non embroidery files.  They don’t open, are they important can I delete them.  


another question, why do I sometimes get a message asking me if I want to transfer a design without its properties, usually when I drag and drop, or copy, but if I do it “properly” in software I don’t get that message, am I doing something wrong? 


thank you I did try and search the database but I didn’t get any hits. 


How to choose the correct gauge of thread according to your needle

Jim Stutsman
 
Edited

This helpful video link was sent by one of our international members. She found it very helpful in avoiding skipped stitches or broken needles. I haven't seen this information in any of the videos that commonly float around the sewing web. It's short, to the point, and really helpful. Thanks MaEmilia!

For those not fluent in Spanish (that would be me), the title of the video is the title of this post. It starts with pointing out industrial needles vs. household needles. Next is 3 weights of thread to demonstrate how to check against needle size.

Test 1 - Correct gauge
Pass the thread through the eye of the needle you are going to use. Turn the needle and hold the thread vertically. The needle should go down rotating continuously and evenly.

Test 2 - Very thick thread
Repeat the previous step with the thread you will use. Very thick thread gauge = needle getting stuck. This can cause needle breakage or damage to your machine.

Test 3 - Very thin thread
Very thin thread gauge = needle that slips and falls. This can cause constant thread breakage.


Re: How Would You Do This?

vicki J. Wardwell <vjw_65@...>
 

Only do the word on one layer the front fabric heavy wash-away stabilizer Do not stitch the center placement dot.
--
Vicki Jane Hull- Wardwell


Re: Puckers in embroidery

Patricia Ward
 

Thank you very much for the detailed explanation.  
I have always used the Best Press for the quilt blocks to embroider. I would get it stiff, then fuse the pellon to it then embroider the blocks.  

Now as to embroidery on clothing, I have not had to stiffen the fabric because I have been careful to use designs that are not heavy and dense knowing how they would pull on the fabric.    Guess now with what you explained to me, I may decide to do more clothing embroidery. 
And really at my age, I have been doing more embroidery on quilted items then clothing for after one is retired and old you only need so much clothing.. 😉

Thank you for taking all of the time to write the detailed explanation and I am sure it will help someone else too.  

Pat 

On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 11:06 AM favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:
Pat, it's just as Virginia says. 
Best Press is really more of a Sizing product which doesn't stiffen fabric. It's great for fabric that will be cut into pieces for quilt piecing and that kind of thing, BUT for embroidery you need stiffness. Also, the same goes for decorative stitching. Stiff!
Now about pressing Starched Fabric. It will not mess up your iron if you do it properly.
  • Spray a layer on one side of the fabric.
  • Let it soak in for several minutes. Don't shorten this step! Depending on the temperature of your environment this may need to be longer or shorter time. Sometimes I take my fabric outside and let it air dry for a little while.
  • Then turn the fabric over to the opposite side and press dry.
  • Give it a few seconds to cool down a bit.
  • Then spray it again.
  • Let it soak in...
  • Repeat this process at least 2-3 times depending on how stiffened you need the fabric to be. For most cotton fabrics I do 3 times.
This doesn't work with polyester fabric, polyester doesn't absorb the starch.

Why starch messes up an iron:  
  • Because it hasn't absorbed into the fabric
  • You've pressed the wet starch, Press the opposite side.
  • Also, Scorching the fabric will happen if you use a hot iron on the starch side of the fabric and it hasn't absorbed into the fibers well enough.
As you can see this takes a little foresight to plan ahead and prepare the fabric because it takes some extra time. It's well worth your efforts. You'll notice a huge difference in the quality of your embroidered & decorative stitching items.

Now about Terial: It's a great product too. It also requires some planning ahead to prepare the fabric. Best results are to soak the fabric by either spraying it or soaking in a bowl. Let it air dry for quite awhile before you try to press it.
I like it alot for clothing because it is so stiff, BUT I don't like the smell of it at all, so for most of my embroidery I prefer the Starch method.
Also, I have problems with the Terial spotting the fabric, so it has to be washed out, whereas with Starch I don't have the spotting problem.

Hope this helps!
-Favymtz





--
Favymtz 


Re: Puckers in embroidery

Stephanie Olson <4stefinny@...>
 

Yes, It helps a lot.  Using the starch needed instructions for sure.  The knowledge you gave us about stiffening the fabric to avoid puckering is very much appreciated.  Thank You!!


On Sat, Jul 25, 2020 at 11:06 AM favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:
Pat, it's just as Virginia says. 
Best Press is really more of a Sizing product which doesn't stiffen fabric. It's great for fabric that will be cut into pieces for quilt piecing and that kind of thing, BUT for embroidery you need stiffness. Also, the same goes for decorative stitching. Stiff!
Now about pressing Starched Fabric. It will not mess up your iron if you do it properly.
  • Spray a layer on one side of the fabric.
  • Let it soak in for several minutes. Don't shorten this step! Depending on the temperature of your environment this may need to be longer or shorter time. Sometimes I take my fabric outside and let it air dry for a little while.
  • Then turn the fabric over to the opposite side and press dry.
  • Give it a few seconds to cool down a bit.
  • Then spray it again.
  • Let it soak in...
  • Repeat this process at least 2-3 times depending on how stiffened you need the fabric to be. For most cotton fabrics I do 3 times.
This doesn't work with polyester fabric, polyester doesn't absorb the starch.

Why starch messes up an iron:  
  • Because it hasn't absorbed into the fabric
  • You've pressed the wet starch, Press the opposite side.
  • Also, Scorching the fabric will happen if you use a hot iron on the starch side of the fabric and it hasn't absorbed into the fibers well enough.
As you can see this takes a little foresight to plan ahead and prepare the fabric because it takes some extra time. It's well worth your efforts. You'll notice a huge difference in the quality of your embroidered & decorative stitching items.

Now about Terial: It's a great product too. It also requires some planning ahead to prepare the fabric. Best results are to soak the fabric by either spraying it or soaking in a bowl. Let it air dry for quite awhile before you try to press it.
I like it alot for clothing because it is so stiff, BUT I don't like the smell of it at all, so for most of my embroidery I prefer the Starch method.
Also, I have problems with the Terial spotting the fabric, so it has to be washed out, whereas with Starch I don't have the spotting problem.

Hope this helps!
-Favymtz





--
Favymtz 


Re: Puckers in embroidery

favymtz
 

Pat, it's just as Virginia says. 
Best Press is really more of a Sizing product which doesn't stiffen fabric. It's great for fabric that will be cut into pieces for quilt piecing and that kind of thing, BUT for embroidery you need stiffness. Also, the same goes for decorative stitching. Stiff!
Now about pressing Starched Fabric. It will not mess up your iron if you do it properly.
  • Spray a layer on one side of the fabric.
  • Let it soak in for several minutes. Don't shorten this step! Depending on the temperature of your environment this may need to be longer or shorter time. Sometimes I take my fabric outside and let it air dry for a little while.
  • Then turn the fabric over to the opposite side and press dry.
  • Give it a few seconds to cool down a bit.
  • Then spray it again.
  • Let it soak in...
  • Repeat this process at least 2-3 times depending on how stiffened you need the fabric to be. For most cotton fabrics I do 3 times.
This doesn't work with polyester fabric, polyester doesn't absorb the starch.

Why starch messes up an iron:  
  • Because it hasn't absorbed into the fabric
  • You've pressed the wet starch, Press the opposite side.
  • Also, Scorching the fabric will happen if you use a hot iron on the starch side of the fabric and it hasn't absorbed into the fibers well enough.
As you can see this takes a little foresight to plan ahead and prepare the fabric because it takes some extra time. It's well worth your efforts. You'll notice a huge difference in the quality of your embroidered & decorative stitching items.

Now about Terial: It's a great product too. It also requires some planning ahead to prepare the fabric. Best results are to soak the fabric by either spraying it or soaking in a bowl. Let it air dry for quite awhile before you try to press it.
I like it alot for clothing because it is so stiff, BUT I don't like the smell of it at all, so for most of my embroidery I prefer the Starch method.
Also, I have problems with the Terial spotting the fabric, so it has to be washed out, whereas with Starch I don't have the spotting problem.

Hope this helps!
-Favymtz





--
Favymtz 


Re: Puckers in embroidery

Virginia
 

Best Press does not stiffen. Terial Magic will stiffen like a really heavy starch.  I use it to stiffen when I need to cut fabric at times (not all the time)with my cut machine. But other than that I would use Best Press or June Tailor lite spray starch.
 

-------- Original message --------
From: Patricia Ward <ward.pm@...>
Date: 7/24/20 3:59 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Subject: Re: [onlinesewing-janome] Puckers in embroidery
 
Hi Favy,  can you tell me  why "Best Press" is not a good thing to use to stiffen fabric.  I have used that for years and had good results.  Is there something that makes the fabric even more stiff?   I am not fond of heavy spray starch because of what it does to the bottom of the iron.   
But sometimes when doing a lot of fabric that needs to be stiff, I will dump it into the washer with a bottle of the liquid starch then line dry it.  
 
Is the Terial Magic so much better than the Best Press?  
 
Thank you for the information,
 
Pat 

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 9:17 AM favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:
Re Stiffen the fabric:
I Always Use a fabric stiffener to prepare the fabric before embroidery or decorative stitching. (Unless it’s not a washable!)
 I consider this a temporary, but necessary stabilizer!
 
Heavy Spray Starch
Terial Magic
Odif (a new to me spray-on stiffener)
Gloop=Dissolve scraps of water soluble stabilizer in water
 
Also, “Best Press” is not adequate for this purpose
 
Favymtz 

--
Favymtz 

 

 


Re: Puckers in embroidery

Patricia Ward
 

Hi Favy,  can you tell me  why "Best Press" is not a good thing to use to stiffen fabric.  I have used that for years and had good results.  Is there something that makes the fabric even more stiff?   I am not fond of heavy spray starch because of what it does to the bottom of the iron.   
But sometimes when doing a lot of fabric that needs to be stiff, I will dump it into the washer with a bottle of the liquid starch then line dry it.  

Is the Terial Magic so much better than the Best Press?  

Thank you for the information,

Pat 

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 9:17 AM favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:
Re Stiffen the fabric:
I Always Use a fabric stiffener to prepare the fabric before embroidery or decorative stitching. (Unless it’s not a washable!)
 I consider this a temporary, but necessary stabilizer!

Heavy Spray Starch
Terial Magic
Odif (a new to me spray-on stiffener)
Gloop=Dissolve scraps of water soluble stabilizer in water

Also, “Best Press” is not adequate for this purpose

Favymtz 

--
Favymtz 


Design Question

Sara Jane
 


Why is it that every time I save my design from .EMB to ,JEF  (in MBX 5) It turns upside down?  thank you, Sara


Re: Puckers in embroidery

Kay Davis
 

Thanks for the info. Good idea. 

On Fri, Jul 24, 2020 at 9:17 AM favymtz <favymtz@...> wrote:
Re Stiffen the fabric:
I Always Use a fabric stiffener to prepare the fabric before embroidery or decorative stitching. (Unless it’s not a washable!)
 I consider this a temporary, but necessary stabilizer!

Heavy Spray Starch
Terial Magic
Odif (a new to me spray-on stiffener)
Gloop=Dissolve scraps of water soluble stabilizer in water

Also, “Best Press” is not adequate for this purpose

Favymtz 

--
Favymtz 


Re: How Would You Do This?

Kathy Strabel
 

Thank you to all that took the time to reply to my request for suggestions on how to layer and quilt a potholder. I have not been able to complete the project because I have found that the lettering in the design I want to use is not stitching out very well. I contacted the company where I bought the design, and they said they could see where the lettering could use some improvements and that they would contact the digitizer to see if the design could be altered or improved, and if that was not possible, I could get a refund for that design. I think that is a good policy because most places that supply any kind of digital product say that they do not do refunds, exchanges --and some don't even accept any change orders or cancellations. I am awaiting a follow-up to see if the design I chose can actually be made to look its best. 

 In the past, I had a similar problem with a vintage-type of floral design. The very tiny centers of some of the flowers pulled out immediately. I saw them stitch into the fabric, but they un-ravelled when I took the project out of the hoop. The company actually re-worked the design for me in a new file. They said that sometimes very small items like dots or flower centers with very few stitches don't seem to "obey" the tie-off at the end of that particular small element of a design.    I know that some stitching errors are "Operator Error", but in these two cases, that was not the case. Before you complain to a design seller, be sure that you are using the best combination of hoop, fabric, stabilizer, needle,  thread type and size, tension, bobbin thread, etc. And do several different  test stitch-outs to eliminate the possibility of said "Operator Error".   Happy stitching to all and stay cool, safe and healthy!!!
Kathy Strabel   Camas WA


Re: USB A 3.0 extender doesn’t work

Lyn Quine
 

I bought a 3.0 and it’s working just fine.  Mine is a 15000 V2 which has been upgraded to a V3 not sure if that makes a difference.  I tried to get a 2.0 extender but couldn’t find one, so got a 3 because it would work with my PC anyway, but it works ok on my machine


Re: USB A 3.0 extender doesn’t work

Diane
 

Only a 2.0 extender works with the 15000.

Diane B

On Thu, Jul 23, 2020, 1:55 PM 41ford Astleford <41fordsuperdeluxe@...> wrote:
Finally got the nerve to try the USB 3.0 extender and it works fine on my 400E that I bought last year.  I am also using a 16 GB flash drive with no problems.  I made subfiles under the EMF file for each group of embroidery designs ie: flowers, animals, etc. Most of my embroidery files are on this flash drive and I have had no problem.  Love my Janome!


Re: Puckers in embroidery

favymtz
 

Re Stiffen the fabric:
I Always Use a fabric stiffener to prepare the fabric before embroidery or decorative stitching. (Unless it’s not a washable!)
 I consider this a temporary, but necessary stabilizer!

Heavy Spray Starch
Terial Magic
Odif (a new to me spray-on stiffener)
Gloop=Dissolve scraps of water soluble stabilizer in water

Also, “Best Press” is not adequate for this purpose

Favymtz 

--
Favymtz 


Re: How Would You Do This?

vicki J. Wardwell <vjw_65@...>
 

Cut all 3 front batting back same exact size Place a center dot at beginning of Word when all re-hooped be sure the needle goes to center dot first.
When you design the quilting it must go to center dot first then proceed to quilt the area around the word.
I would carefully center  hoop top fabric then embroider the word then i would re-hoop place batting for heat under top and under it the backing fabric of the potholder match up the edges [ the embroidered one will of course shrink a bit re-hoop all 3.
Good luck.
Insul brite is the batting;
--
Vicki Jane Hull- Wardwell

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