Date   

Re: Router ports to open and UDP or TCP?

Ceil J
 

Thank you.  The router guy was certainly way off base and the local tech who contacted me explained that those folks have an average employment time of 9 months.   I will mention to the computer tech about the two options but I'm beginning to be confident that there's something wrong with this laptop as the reason for the new router was due to the laptop repeatedly dropping the main network saying it wasn't secure.   I was using a Netgear router on top of the main router but it had been working fine for months.   They said the newer router would be all I need and would fix the problem. Yes, it did solve one problem and now there is another.


Re: Router ports to open and UDP or TCP?

Ceil J
 

Yes, thank you to you both.  This is now much clearer.  This request was from a group that handles the overflow for our local techs.  The local tech saw the trouble ticket and called me.  Now my (old) desktop can communicate with both the printer and the Janome so it seems it's the relatively new laptop that has a problem.  So far hours with their tech support has yielded no results and so I've been backing up everything in anticipation of a system wipe and replace.  UGH.  But thank you again.  The router could not  have been the problem if it let one computer interact with the network, so the laptop is the problem.


Re: Router ports to open and UDP or TCP?

Mattes
 

Router ports to be opened are important for a communication from external (internet) devices into your home network. With both parties - your embroidery machine and PC - being inside of your network, they are totally irrelevant.

The "router people" should more look into the intercommunication between the 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz WiFi: There might be a network separation in place.

Greetings, Mattes


Re: Router ports to open and UDP or TCP?

Jim Stutsman
 

There are two "sides" to your network. The Wide Area Network (WAN) is the Internet, the outside world. That's where you need to be very careful about exposing the router to the legions of miscreants bent on getting in. The other side is the Local Area Network (LAN) inside your house. Devices that are all on the LAN don't need to worry abut ports and protocols, unless the go out to the WAN. The reason Janome does not publish port address or UDP/TCP is because the machine does not go on the WAN at all. It sounds like your guys don't quite understand how it works. You want to firewall the router on the WAN side, but on the LAN side there isn't much chance of one of your devices trying to hack another device. Maybe they're trying to protect you from a WiFi attack from someone sitting outside the house, but that's best done with encryption and noticing that somebody is sitting in front of the house with a phone or computer.


Re: Report of spam

Jim Stutsman
 

Some very aggressive spam filters will toss out anything that contains a web link.


Report of spam

jagolemon@...
 

I have tried to tell it’s not spam but for some reason it occasionally goes to it
along with several other that I normally receive 


Router ports to open and UDP or TCP?

Ceil J
 

I had to replace my router and now my laptop won't communicate with the machine even though both are on the same network (the printer won't work either).  I'm not sure that the router people are on top of this as my desktop can still communicate with the machine, but not with the printer.
They want to know what ports Janome needs to have open and whether those ports are UDP or TCP (means nothing to me and I don't need to know).  I'm thinking that the older desktop is on the 2.4 router part along with the Janome but my desktop is on the 5, and that's the problem but that still doesn't explain why neither can connect to the printer.  But they want the ports information and they will go from there. 
Thanks for any help.  This is way beyond my capabilities.


Re: How Would You Do This?

Cheryl Alm
 

Insul-bright is a good choice for a batting in potholders.  I would not use a fusible to bond your embroidered piece to the quilted layer. I think your plan will work well to bind all the layers together.


From: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io> on behalf of Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...>
Sent: Sunday, July 5, 2020 4:01:05 PM
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io>
Subject: [onlinesewing-janome] How Would You Do This?
 
Hello, Group!
Hope your 4th was enjoyable and safe--in all ways.

I need some opinions on a simple project. I want to make some potholders that will have words only embroidered on their fronts, and I want them to be quilted so that they are actually safe to use. I will be using batting appropriate for potholders, but I can't recall the names or brands of the batting that fits that description.  So that is my first request--what batting have you used for pot holders, and how have you liked what you used?  Any special things to know about the products?

  Number 2: I don't think the fronts of the potholders will lend itself well with quilting, because it will just be satin stitched words, so no motifs to just stitch around., and a grid of quilting might just interfere with the words.  So, how would you approach this? I was thinking maybe constructing the potholders in 2 quilted layers with just a plain fabric for the front, and a patterned fabric for the back. Then overlaying a layer on the front, quilted side. This overlay would be the embroidered words on a lightweight twill cotton fabric.  I would then bind all layers together.  Should I also bond the overlay to the quilted layer that would be underneath it, using a fusible product?  I know fusibles are not usually natural fibers and melt easily.    Any alternates to a fusible? Do I even need that??

Thanks in advance for your thoughts on this.... I just want to make this "reality check" to see if I am thinking correctly.

Kathy Strabel   Camas WA


Re: How Would You Do This?

dmrestates
 

I would just quilt around the words.



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S9, an AT&T 5G Evolution capable smartphone


-------- Original message --------
From: Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...>
Date: 7/5/20 6:13 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Subject: [onlinesewing-janome] How Would You Do This?

Hello, Group!
Hope your 4th was enjoyable and safe--in all ways.

I need some opinions on a simple project. I want to make some potholders that will have words only embroidered on their fronts, and I want them to be quilted so that they are actually safe to use. I will be using batting appropriate for potholders, but I can't recall the names or brands of the batting that fits that description.  So that is my first request--what batting have you used for pot holders, and how have you liked what you used?  Any special things to know about the products?

  Number 2: I don't think the fronts of the potholders will lend itself well with quilting, because it will just be satin stitched words, so no motifs to just stitch around., and a grid of quilting might just interfere with the words.  So, how would you approach this? I was thinking maybe constructing the potholders in 2 quilted layers with just a plain fabric for the front, and a patterned fabric for the back. Then overlaying a layer on the front, quilted side. This overlay would be the embroidered words on a lightweight twill cotton fabric.  I would then bind all layers together.  Should I also bond the overlay to the quilted layer that would be underneath it, using a fusible product?  I know fusibles are not usually natural fibers and melt easily.    Any alternates to a fusible? Do I even need that??

Thanks in advance for your thoughts on this.... I just want to make this "reality check" to see if I am thinking correctly.

Kathy Strabel   Camas WA


Re: That white plastic part the bobbin sits atop....

Jim Stutsman
 

It's definitely not "rocket surgery" as they say. Yes, it's held in place by that single Phillips screw and a bit of glue. I've never used glue in replacing the disc, and I kind of think they use the glue in the factory assembly process to hold it in place until it gets to the "put in the screw" station. Your only difficulty might be in getting the part. It will have to come from a dealer. Getting the old one out is slightly tricky, because of the shape of it. Since I am tossing the old one I generally just brute force it out, bending as needed. Putting in the new one requires a little patience to orient it so it goes in correctly. You might snap a photo before you take the old on out, just to get a reference for positioning. You kind of tip it to get it under the rim of the hook race, and then turn it to get the "tongue" bit to go through the large slot. Once you have it in the hook race you can usually just turn the hand wheel until the screw hole lines up. This is a case where a magnetic screwdriver is REALLY helpful. The screw is small, and it is perilously easy for it to drop down into the bed of the machine. That's not fatal, but now you have more screws to take out to get it back. A magnetized screwdriver will hold it until you get it started in the mounting hole.

When ordering you might consider getting 2 or 3 of the discs. They are quite cheap, should not be more than $1-2 each. Broken needles have a way of finding their way down to dig a new groove in the disc.


Re: That white plastic part the bobbin sits atop....

Kathy Strabel
 

Jim--Thanks for your response!! And hope your 4th was  a good one!   Regarding that white plastic piece that the bobbin sits atop in my S7---since it is such a quick repair (5 minutes), is it something that I could just switch out on my own? I see a screw holding it in. Is the replacement process just unscrewing that one screw and replacing the plastic part? I am not having any real issue; but if I can replace a part on my own, I would like to do that. As a preventive, maintenance thing. .   Thank you!!!
Kathy Strabel   Camas  WA


How Would You Do This?

Kathy Strabel
 

Hello, Group!
Hope your 4th was enjoyable and safe--in all ways.

I need some opinions on a simple project. I want to make some potholders that will have words only embroidered on their fronts, and I want them to be quilted so that they are actually safe to use. I will be using batting appropriate for potholders, but I can't recall the names or brands of the batting that fits that description.  So that is my first request--what batting have you used for pot holders, and how have you liked what you used?  Any special things to know about the products?

  Number 2: I don't think the fronts of the potholders will lend itself well with quilting, because it will just be satin stitched words, so no motifs to just stitch around., and a grid of quilting might just interfere with the words.  So, how would you approach this? I was thinking maybe constructing the potholders in 2 quilted layers with just a plain fabric for the front, and a patterned fabric for the back. Then overlaying a layer on the front, quilted side. This overlay would be the embroidered words on a lightweight twill cotton fabric.  I would then bind all layers together.  Should I also bond the overlay to the quilted layer that would be underneath it, using a fusible product?  I know fusibles are not usually natural fibers and melt easily.    Any alternates to a fusible? Do I even need that??

Thanks in advance for your thoughts on this.... I just want to make this "reality check" to see if I am thinking correctly.

Kathy Strabel   Camas WA


Re: Janome help group

vicki J. Wardwell <vjw_65@...>
 

No I have a Janome MC  6500 Pro and will never have anything newer
--
Vicki Jane Hull- Wardwell


Re: Janome 350e

mah_jongg
 

For the 550e you can purchase the smaller 7.9 x 11 RE28b hoop. Its on my "as soon as I get caught up on bills" list. Sure wish they would make smaller hoops for the 550e. The 5 x 5 is too big for the older smaller designs. The 1.5" hoops are too small. Need a 3.5 x 3.5 or 4 x 4 hoop size. I'd use my 10000 (for the smaller designs) but it never embroidered right since the day I bought it when the 10000 first came out.


Re: Janome 350e

Lyn Quine
 

The giga hoop will work with a 350E it is a split design hoop.  I had a 350E and it does work, it is an optional extra.


Re: Janome 350e

Tracy
 

No - your 3503 won't take the 7.9x14 hoop and actually - it's max stitch field is 5.5x7.9 so the larger hoop that you got with your machine will not work either.  I'm guessing this was a private sale and some things got send with your machine that did not belong.

Sorry!  Tracy in Nashville, TN


Re: Janome 350e

bhoryn
 

Please disregard this post.  I must have been suffering from COVID brain the day I posted.   I just rechecked my hoops.  😳. I do have the RE36b hoop 7.9 x 14.2.  Sorry everyone.  My machine is the 550e. ☺️


Re: Janome 350e

m.drozdis
 

I have both machines. The hoops aren't interchangeable.

MarieD

On July 3, 2020 2:35 PM Pixey via groups.io <pixeyam=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


Do you maybe have a 500e, not the 350e? The 500e has the 7.9 x 11 hoop as its largest. The 550e is the newest model that introduces the 7.9 x 14 hoop. I don’t think you can use the 7.9 x 14 hoop on the 500e because it has not had a software update


Re: Janome 350e

Pixey
 

Do you maybe have a 500e, not the 350e?  The 500e has the 7.9 x 11 hoop as its largest.  The 550e is the newest model that introduces the 7.9 x 14 hoop.  I don’t think you can use the 7.9 x 14 hoop on the 500e because it has not had a software update that would allow the machine to recognize it.  Also, the arm where the hoop attaches is a little different on the 550e.  I think this is to allow the longer hoop movement required by the 14” hoop.

Pixey


On Jul 2, 2020, at 2:13 PM, bhoryn via groups.io <bhoryn@...> wrote:

My machine came with the biggest hoop size of 7.9 x 11.     Will it take the 7.9 x 14 if I ordered the larger hoop?     Thanks. 


Re: Help again

Claire Schutz
 

Is it possible to contact the company about all of this?  Claire S.

On 7/2/2020 10:53 PM, SDY Trading wrote:
Sorry Jim ..I have been trying to send you this message separately but always return back to me ..so I had to do this reply ..u might get it this time.

Hello Jim ,
I don’t know if u remember me ,I sent you 10 days ago about my 15000 with big blue nest and message on the screen that doesn’t go nor let any thing move.
The dealer where I live couldn’t fix it .. they suggested send the machine to Japan on my cost . 
That is really a fortune . Should I throw the machine 🙈..I already invested a lot of money on the machine and bought the extras .. feet .. hoops .. extensions .. 
Any suggestions! Really desperate. 
Thank you for listening.
Hala


On Jun 22, 2020, at 2:39 AM, Jim Stutsman via groups.io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:

BEFORE YOU TAKE IT IN - Remove the needle plate and bobbin holder. Use magnification and a bright light to closely inspect the rim of the silver "basket" that the bobbin case rides. In 25 years of servicing machines every time I was presented with a machine that "eats bobbin cases" there was damage to the hook race. Small pits usually just cause clicking while sewing, but nicks and deep gouges will cause the stitch to catch and not release properly. That will pull the case up and spin it, causing this kind of problem and usually more damage. Many dealers never look for this. There is a tool available to them (Part #OILSTONE) that will polish out minor damage, but if the hook race is notched or deeply damaged it should be replaced.

Another thing to check is the position of the bobbin case and stopper. Look at the area circled in this photo. The little "nub" on the bobbin case should be in full contact with the stopper. If the stopper is too far toward the front of the machine it is super easy for the case to pop up and spin, especially at high speed. Also note the position of the spring that the case bumps up agains. It should be absolutely straight as shown in the photo. If it is bent, or worse, missing, the stopper should be replaced.

<Capto_Capture 2020-06-21_05-34-09_PM.png>

2721 - 2740 of 29731