Date   

Re: 15000 and power surger

Carole Hollmann
 

Jim—

I’ve just had another bubble burst, as I have “surge protectors” on all my more expensive items. While I paid more than $10 US, they are probably no longer protecting anything. I don’t want the 20-pound UPS devices all over the place, so is there anything that can be used that might offer some protection?

I leave my sewing machines unplugged unless I’m actually using them. 

Thanks. 

Carole



On Dec 29, 2019, at 9:42 AM, Jim Stutsman via Groups.Io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:

What most people don't realize is that the surge suppressor built into the $10 "power strip" sold pretty much everywhere only works once or twice. The part that keeps it cheap is a Metal Oxide Variable resistor (MOV). It will stop a surge, but the surge itself destroys the device. Once a strip has encountered one or two surges, it's essentially just an extension cord that offers no protection at all. Contrast this with a UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply, not the brown truck) which physically disconnects from the power whenever the voltage is too low or too high. This offers better protection, but has the annoyance of a battery that fails in 3-5 years. Worse, you usually won't know that the battery has failed until the power goes out. When it comes back most of them wail uncontrollably with a dead battery. This ranks right up there with smoke alarms that always wait until 2am to signal the fact that their batteries need replacing.


Re: iPad/iCloud question

Pixey
 

By the way, I could definitely relate to your story of someone dear to you saving in “Word”.  Because of the nature of the academic and workplace environment where I built most of my computer experience, I was always aware of the difference between local machine and centrally backed up network/cloud storage for files and the structure of drives and folders.  However, on more than one occasion I have been called upon to help my mom or dad find a file that they saved “in Word” (or WordPerfect before it) but subsequently “lost”.

The other area that I am having to really build my knowledge about is the “backup” functions and transferring from old to new devices.  Thus far, the manner in which I used my home laptop and iPad was such that it would not be a huge deal if something crashed and I needed to do a simple file or iTunes library restore from a portable hard drive.  But that is going to change with retirement...so I know I need to look more into a more structured, ongoing backup process there as well.

One thing about my job that I will miss once I retire is a dedicated IT department that never minded the occasional off topic home computing question.

Pixey


On Dec 28, 2019, at 10:48 PM, Pixey via Groups.Io <pixeyam@...> wrote:

Thanks Jim.  This is helpful in understanding particularly about the new ability to Browse and manage individual files.  The developer of the media library app did confirm it uses the 5G allocation if I do a backup but I did some math and I think that even if I use it to inventory all my books, videos, and CDs, it won’t use more than 2G max.  I don’t actually save my iPad photos to the cloud as most of them are temporary.  

As I do more, I may go ahead and up my iCloud storage...I did like that it offers more incremental pricing flexibility than Dropbox.

Pixey


On Dec 28, 2019, at 6:07 PM, Jim Stutsman via Groups.Io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:

That's a really good question. Every app, including ThreadBook, has its own chunk of iCloud space. However the space used by ThreadBook is a special allotment that is available to all devices using the same Apple ID, even if they have never logged in to iCloud. It is limited to 1MB, so it uses very little of the 5GB you get for free. I chose to use this because not all users of iPads are aware of iCloud or how it works. Because of the very limited size of this space, most apps use the conventional iCloud storage that requires you to log in. There are three different types of storage available to each app. The PUBLIC storage is where the app developer usually stores things that are common to all installed apps. This would be things like images for game levels, templates, and in the case of ThreadBook, updates to the Library installed on each device. Because this space is public, it does not count against your storage. It's generally free to the developer, although there is a formula that Apple uses to charge for it depending on the amount of storage used, the number of app installations, and the amount of bandwidth used. PRIVATE storage is where the documents live that you create, like text documents, spreadsheets, etc. This space does count against your allotted storage. The third type of iCloud storage is SHARED. This is where things go that app users want to share with other users. It might be things like photos, calendars, or other items of interest to a particular group. This also does not count against your allotted iCloud storage.

Initially apps could only open files in their own iCloud space, whether PUBLIC or PRIVATE. That fits the model that most people have of how computer storage works. Many times in helping my beloved with document issues, I would say where did you save it and I would get the answer "Word". Because the document was created by Word, it was assumed that's where it would be, and I would respond with "Word is a program, not a place." However in the first generation of iCloud, each app was also a place. This created frustration if you wanted to open a document, such as a plain text file, with a different app than the one that created it. Apple modified iOS so that a file could be copied from one app's space to another. This capability is still there today, as we saw in previous posts about opening embroidery files in AcuEdit. They then opened things up even more by allowing an app to open a file in another app's space if you have permission. This allows, for example, for multiple people to edit the same document. It's a little tricky to program for, and is not generally used outside of the Apple "business" apps like Pages, Numbers, and Keynote. In a recent iteration of iOS they introduced the "Files" app, which essentially lets you browse all of your iCloud files like you would on a desktop or laptop computer. Like Windows, when you open a file it will open in the app the is assigned to open such files. Also like Windows, having one and only one app to open a file of a given type creates problems. With that app you also get iCloud Drive, which is basically a storage bucket that you can reach from your iPhone, iPad, Mac, or Windows PC. This makes for convenient backup, but it's not at all clear how you can manage it. As you discovered, "Manage Cloud Storage" is an all-or-nothing proposition and not at all what the name would imply.

The most recent iOS version, 13, seems to be proof that 13 is an unlucky number due to the large number of bugs and frantic updates it has had. However it does have one feature that makes it easy to manage files. Whether you are looking at document in an app (Note - a document could be a spreadsheet, a text document, image, or whatever the app is built to make), or a document in the Files app "Browse" function, tapping and holding the document will produce a menu of options. This includes Copy, Duplicate, Move, *AND* Delete. Be very careful with the delete option, as it does not ask you to confirm. It just deletes, immediately. If you navigate back to the first page of the Browse function you will find a folder of "Recently Deleted" files. Tap and hold on a document there to Delete Now (forever!) or Recover. You can also tap the "Info" button to get more details about the file.

When you buy any Apple device you get 5GB of iCloud space for free. That's NOT 5GB per device, it's just 5GB period. This is pretty meager, especially if you let Apple store all your photos in iCloud, which they will do by default if you don't stop them. You can get 200GB of storage for $3 a month, and you can share that with other family members. The next jump is 2TB (2,000GB) for $10 a month. There are no other options. A number of other companies offer cloud storage, one example being Dropbox. However all of them will reach a point where you have to pay, and none of them are as smoothly integrated into iOS as iCloud.

Hopefully this clarifies things a bit, but please feel free to follow up with additional questions. Since creating ThreadBook I have, of necessity, had to learn a lot more about iCloud.


Re: Thick Seams

Cheryl Paul
 

Hi Carole,

Yes, the 8200QPC is the “8200”. I have the 15000 which is actually the Memory Craft 15000 Quilt Maker, as I upgraded my Version 1 machine to the what the newest model is called, even though the colour of the my machine doesn’t have the little rose coloured bar on it face or the name “Quilt Maker”. It is just easier to say the number of the machine than all the letters that are included. Another example is the very newest and bigger Janome so far the “Continental M7 Professional”. She’s been shorted to the M7, so you see how things can get a bit confusing.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


Re: 15000 and power surger

Jim Stutsman
 

What most people don't realize is that the surge suppressor built into the $10 "power strip" sold pretty much everywhere only works once or twice. The part that keeps it cheap is a Metal Oxide Variable resistor (MOV). It will stop a surge, but the surge itself destroys the device. Once a strip has encountered one or two surges, it's essentially just an extension cord that offers no protection at all. Contrast this with a UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply, not the brown truck) which physically disconnects from the power whenever the voltage is too low or too high. This offers better protection, but has the annoyance of a battery that fails in 3-5 years. Worse, you usually won't know that the battery has failed until the power goes out. When it comes back most of them wail uncontrollably with a dead battery. This ranks right up there with smoke alarms that always wait until 2am to signal the fact that their batteries need replacing.


Re: 15000 and power surger

Jim Stutsman
 

Switching the plug from a surge suppressor to the wall connection could not have caused the message. The message you got is a generic one that more accurately should say "One of the self-tests failed, but I'm not going to tell you which one." On the 15000 the needle plate sensor is a popular place for this to occur, as the switch is very tiny and has a limited range of travel. Moving the machine to unplug it could have caused it to stop failing. Sometimes removing the needle plate and reinstalling it is enough, but it also sometimes requires adjustment by a technician to stop the error.


Re: How much should it cost

Judy Albert
 

I had to replace the ribbon on my embroidery unit of my MC12000.  The part (the celluloid film) cost $3.47 and the labor cost was $45.00.  The machine is 6 yrs old.  Small price to pay to get it working again.

Judy in Fairfax VA


Re: iPad/iCloud question

Kim Normandin
 

Wow!  I learned a lot from this email thread. Thank you so much.  


On Dec 28, 2019, at 7:07 PM, Jim Stutsman via Groups.Io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:

That's a really good question. Every app, including ThreadBook, has its own chunk of iCloud space. However the space used by ThreadBook is a special allotment that is available to all devices using the same Apple ID, even if they have never logged in to iCloud. It is limited to 1MB, so it uses very little of the 5GB you get for free. I chose to use this because not all users of iPads are aware of iCloud or how it works. Because of the very limited size of this space, most apps use the conventional iCloud storage that requires you to log in. There are three different types of storage available to each app. The PUBLIC storage is where the app developer usually stores things that are common to all installed apps. This would be things like images for game levels, templates, and in the case of ThreadBook, updates to the Library installed on each device. Because this space is public, it does not count against your storage. It's generally free to the developer, although there is a formula that Apple uses to charge for it depending on the amount of storage used, the number of app installations, and the amount of bandwidth used. PRIVATE storage is where the documents live that you create, like text documents, spreadsheets, etc. This space does count against your allotted storage. The third type of iCloud storage is SHARED. This is where things go that app users want to share with other users. It might be things like photos, calendars, or other items of interest to a particular group. This also does not count against your allotted iCloud storage.

Initially apps could only open files in their own iCloud space, whether PUBLIC or PRIVATE. That fits the model that most people have of how computer storage works. Many times in helping my beloved with document issues, I would say where did you save it and I would get the answer "Word". Because the document was created by Word, it was assumed that's where it would be, and I would respond with "Word is a program, not a place." However in the first generation of iCloud, each app was also a place. This created frustration if you wanted to open a document, such as a plain text file, with a different app than the one that created it. Apple modified iOS so that a file could be copied from one app's space to another. This capability is still there today, as we saw in previous posts about opening embroidery files in AcuEdit. They then opened things up even more by allowing an app to open a file in another app's space if you have permission. This allows, for example, for multiple people to edit the same document. It's a little tricky to program for, and is not generally used outside of the Apple "business" apps like Pages, Numbers, and Keynote. In a recent iteration of iOS they introduced the "Files" app, which essentially lets you browse all of your iCloud files like you would on a desktop or laptop computer. Like Windows, when you open a file it will open in the app the is assigned to open such files. Also like Windows, having one and only one app to open a file of a given type creates problems. With that app you also get iCloud Drive, which is basically a storage bucket that you can reach from your iPhone, iPad, Mac, or Windows PC. This makes for convenient backup, but it's not at all clear how you can manage it. As you discovered, "Manage Cloud Storage" is an all-or-nothing proposition and not at all what the name would imply.

The most recent iOS version, 13, seems to be proof that 13 is an unlucky number due to the large number of bugs and frantic updates it has had. However it does have one feature that makes it easy to manage files. Whether you are looking at document in an app (Note - a document could be a spreadsheet, a text document, image, or whatever the app is built to make), or a document in the Files app "Browse" function, tapping and holding the document will produce a menu of options. This includes Copy, Duplicate, Move, *AND* Delete. Be very careful with the delete option, as it does not ask you to confirm. It just deletes, immediately. If you navigate back to the first page of the Browse function you will find a folder of "Recently Deleted" files. Tap and hold on a document there to Delete Now (forever!) or Recover. You can also tap the "Info" button to get more details about the file.

When you buy any Apple device you get 5GB of iCloud space for free. That's NOT 5GB per device, it's just 5GB period. This is pretty meager, especially if you let Apple store all your photos in iCloud, which they will do by default if you don't stop them. You can get 200GB of storage for $3 a month, and you can share that with other family members. The next jump is 2TB (2,000GB) for $10 a month. There are no other options. A number of other companies offer cloud storage, one example being Dropbox. However all of them will reach a point where you have to pay, and none of them are as smoothly integrated into iOS as iCloud.

Hopefully this clarifies things a bit, but please feel free to follow up with additional questions. Since creating ThreadBook I have, of necessity, had to learn a lot more about iCloud.


Re: 15000 and power surger

Theresa Lindal
 

Could be a faulty power surge protector.


Re: 15000 and power surger

Mary Gajdica-Albers <mgajdica@...>
 

Try retreading and cleaning bobbin case - mine did the same thing . 


On Dec 28, 2019, at 9:22 PM, Mary Jo Hirsch <mjhshmoo@...> wrote:

I took my machine to the shop due to a message “ raise foot and needle and turn on again”.  Came home with same message. Unplugged the machine from power surger and plugged in to wall plug.  Machine worked fine.  Can someone tell me this would be happening.


Re: iPad/iCloud question

Pixey
 

Thanks Jim.  This is helpful in understanding particularly about the new ability to Browse and manage individual files.  The developer of the media library app did confirm it uses the 5G allocation if I do a backup but I did some math and I think that even if I use it to inventory all my books, videos, and CDs, it won’t use more than 2G max.  I don’t actually save my iPad photos to the cloud as most of them are temporary.  

As I do more, I may go ahead and up my iCloud storage...I did like that it offers more incremental pricing flexibility than Dropbox.

Pixey


On Dec 28, 2019, at 6:07 PM, Jim Stutsman via Groups.Io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:

That's a really good question. Every app, including ThreadBook, has its own chunk of iCloud space. However the space used by ThreadBook is a special allotment that is available to all devices using the same Apple ID, even if they have never logged in to iCloud. It is limited to 1MB, so it uses very little of the 5GB you get for free. I chose to use this because not all users of iPads are aware of iCloud or how it works. Because of the very limited size of this space, most apps use the conventional iCloud storage that requires you to log in. There are three different types of storage available to each app. The PUBLIC storage is where the app developer usually stores things that are common to all installed apps. This would be things like images for game levels, templates, and in the case of ThreadBook, updates to the Library installed on each device. Because this space is public, it does not count against your storage. It's generally free to the developer, although there is a formula that Apple uses to charge for it depending on the amount of storage used, the number of app installations, and the amount of bandwidth used. PRIVATE storage is where the documents live that you create, like text documents, spreadsheets, etc. This space does count against your allotted storage. The third type of iCloud storage is SHARED. This is where things go that app users want to share with other users. It might be things like photos, calendars, or other items of interest to a particular group. This also does not count against your allotted iCloud storage.

Initially apps could only open files in their own iCloud space, whether PUBLIC or PRIVATE. That fits the model that most people have of how computer storage works. Many times in helping my beloved with document issues, I would say where did you save it and I would get the answer "Word". Because the document was created by Word, it was assumed that's where it would be, and I would respond with "Word is a program, not a place." However in the first generation of iCloud, each app was also a place. This created frustration if you wanted to open a document, such as a plain text file, with a different app than the one that created it. Apple modified iOS so that a file could be copied from one app's space to another. This capability is still there today, as we saw in previous posts about opening embroidery files in AcuEdit. They then opened things up even more by allowing an app to open a file in another app's space if you have permission. This allows, for example, for multiple people to edit the same document. It's a little tricky to program for, and is not generally used outside of the Apple "business" apps like Pages, Numbers, and Keynote. In a recent iteration of iOS they introduced the "Files" app, which essentially lets you browse all of your iCloud files like you would on a desktop or laptop computer. Like Windows, when you open a file it will open in the app the is assigned to open such files. Also like Windows, having one and only one app to open a file of a given type creates problems. With that app you also get iCloud Drive, which is basically a storage bucket that you can reach from your iPhone, iPad, Mac, or Windows PC. This makes for convenient backup, but it's not at all clear how you can manage it. As you discovered, "Manage Cloud Storage" is an all-or-nothing proposition and not at all what the name would imply.

The most recent iOS version, 13, seems to be proof that 13 is an unlucky number due to the large number of bugs and frantic updates it has had. However it does have one feature that makes it easy to manage files. Whether you are looking at document in an app (Note - a document could be a spreadsheet, a text document, image, or whatever the app is built to make), or a document in the Files app "Browse" function, tapping and holding the document will produce a menu of options. This includes Copy, Duplicate, Move, *AND* Delete. Be very careful with the delete option, as it does not ask you to confirm. It just deletes, immediately. If you navigate back to the first page of the Browse function you will find a folder of "Recently Deleted" files. Tap and hold on a document there to Delete Now (forever!) or Recover. You can also tap the "Info" button to get more details about the file.

When you buy any Apple device you get 5GB of iCloud space for free. That's NOT 5GB per device, it's just 5GB period. This is pretty meager, especially if you let Apple store all your photos in iCloud, which they will do by default if you don't stop them. You can get 200GB of storage for $3 a month, and you can share that with other family members. The next jump is 2TB (2,000GB) for $10 a month. There are no other options. A number of other companies offer cloud storage, one example being Dropbox. However all of them will reach a point where you have to pay, and none of them are as smoothly integrated into iOS as iCloud.

Hopefully this clarifies things a bit, but please feel free to follow up with additional questions. Since creating ThreadBook I have, of necessity, had to learn a lot more about iCloud.


Re: 15000 and power surger

Cat - N
 

By "power surger", do you mean a UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply) battery backup, or a surge supressor (6-way power outlet that protects from power spikes)?

- Cat (FL)



-----Original Message-----
From: Mary Jo Hirsch <mjhshmoo@...>
To: onlinesewing-janome <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io>
Sent: Sat, Dec 28, 2019 10:22 pm
Subject: [onlinesewing-janome] 15000 and power surger

I took my machine to the shop due to a message “ raise foot and needle and turn on again”.  Came home with same message. Unplugged the machine from power surger and plugged in to wall plug.  Machine worked fine.  Can someone tell me this would be happening.


15000 and power surger

Mary Jo Hirsch
 

I took my machine to the shop due to a message “ raise foot and needle and turn on again”.  Came home with same message. Unplugged the machine from power surger and plugged in to wall plug.  Machine worked fine.  Can someone tell me this would be happening.


Re: iPad/iCloud question

Jim Stutsman
 

That's a really good question. Every app, including ThreadBook, has its own chunk of iCloud space. However the space used by ThreadBook is a special allotment that is available to all devices using the same Apple ID, even if they have never logged in to iCloud. It is limited to 1MB, so it uses very little of the 5GB you get for free. I chose to use this because not all users of iPads are aware of iCloud or how it works. Because of the very limited size of this space, most apps use the conventional iCloud storage that requires you to log in. There are three different types of storage available to each app. The PUBLIC storage is where the app developer usually stores things that are common to all installed apps. This would be things like images for game levels, templates, and in the case of ThreadBook, updates to the Library installed on each device. Because this space is public, it does not count against your storage. It's generally free to the developer, although there is a formula that Apple uses to charge for it depending on the amount of storage used, the number of app installations, and the amount of bandwidth used. PRIVATE storage is where the documents live that you create, like text documents, spreadsheets, etc. This space does count against your allotted storage. The third type of iCloud storage is SHARED. This is where things go that app users want to share with other users. It might be things like photos, calendars, or other items of interest to a particular group. This also does not count against your allotted iCloud storage.

Initially apps could only open files in their own iCloud space, whether PUBLIC or PRIVATE. That fits the model that most people have of how computer storage works. Many times in helping my beloved with document issues, I would say where did you save it and I would get the answer "Word". Because the document was created by Word, it was assumed that's where it would be, and I would respond with "Word is a program, not a place." However in the first generation of iCloud, each app was also a place. This created frustration if you wanted to open a document, such as a plain text file, with a different app than the one that created it. Apple modified iOS so that a file could be copied from one app's space to another. This capability is still there today, as we saw in previous posts about opening embroidery files in AcuEdit. They then opened things up even more by allowing an app to open a file in another app's space if you have permission. This allows, for example, for multiple people to edit the same document. It's a little tricky to program for, and is not generally used outside of the Apple "business" apps like Pages, Numbers, and Keynote. In a recent iteration of iOS they introduced the "Files" app, which essentially lets you browse all of your iCloud files like you would on a desktop or laptop computer. Like Windows, when you open a file it will open in the app the is assigned to open such files. Also like Windows, having one and only one app to open a file of a given type creates problems. With that app you also get iCloud Drive, which is basically a storage bucket that you can reach from your iPhone, iPad, Mac, or Windows PC. This makes for convenient backup, but it's not at all clear how you can manage it. As you discovered, "Manage Cloud Storage" is an all-or-nothing proposition and not at all what the name would imply.

The most recent iOS version, 13, seems to be proof that 13 is an unlucky number due to the large number of bugs and frantic updates it has had. However it does have one feature that makes it easy to manage files. Whether you are looking at document in an app (Note - a document could be a spreadsheet, a text document, image, or whatever the app is built to make), or a document in the Files app "Browse" function, tapping and holding the document will produce a menu of options. This includes Copy, Duplicate, Move, *AND* Delete. Be very careful with the delete option, as it does not ask you to confirm. It just deletes, immediately. If you navigate back to the first page of the Browse function you will find a folder of "Recently Deleted" files. Tap and hold on a document there to Delete Now (forever!) or Recover. You can also tap the "Info" button to get more details about the file.

When you buy any Apple device you get 5GB of iCloud space for free. That's NOT 5GB per device, it's just 5GB period. This is pretty meager, especially if you let Apple store all your photos in iCloud, which they will do by default if you don't stop them. You can get 200GB of storage for $3 a month, and you can share that with other family members. The next jump is 2TB (2,000GB) for $10 a month. There are no other options. A number of other companies offer cloud storage, one example being Dropbox. However all of them will reach a point where you have to pay, and none of them are as smoothly integrated into iOS as iCloud.

Hopefully this clarifies things a bit, but please feel free to follow up with additional questions. Since creating ThreadBook I have, of necessity, had to learn a lot more about iCloud.


Re: Thick Seams

Carole Hollmann
 

Is the 8200 you mention the same that I am finding on line—that is the MC8200QCP?

Thanks much

Carole


iPad/iCloud question

Pixey
 

Jim,
After I retire at the end of March, I am anticipating a lot more use of my iPad and wanting to back up things to the cloud more than I currently do. I am trying to get a handle on understanding how iCloud storage works. I recently bought an inventorying app for my book/media collections that appears to use my iCloud allocation for the data (unlike ThreadBook).

I can go into settings and see where some of my apps are already backing up to iCloud or I have somehow already saved some documents to it because apparently Numbers was already set to backup to the iCloud. My question is that there does not appear to be possible to actually delete individual files from the iCloud. When I look at Manage iCloud storage and look at which files an app has saved, under Delete Documents and Data it says “This will delete all app data from iCloud and all connected devices. This can’t be undone.”

Obviously I don’t want to necessarily delete all the files associated with an app, but just ones that are no longer important. How does one keep the iCloud clean of unnecessary clutter of ephemeral or old no longer relevant files in order to make the most effective use of the data allocation?

Thanks,
Pixey


Re: How much should it cost

Cheryl Paul
 

I didn’t realize that your Mom was 90 - NO, she wouldn’t want to make a huge investment into a repair or on another machine.  I was just sharing my experience with a machine I owned some years back.  The repair didn’t cost me what I might have had to pay, partly because it should have been a warranty issue, just that I was out of country, and it wouldn’t have been thousands of dollars if the warranty had been used up.  However, it would have been an unsetting amount of money if Mulqueen’s hadn’t been so kind.

Oh, and the machine was purchased in October of 2012 not 2011, a few months after Janome Institute when it was launched, so I had only had it for a couple months when it needed a major repair.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


Re: How much should it cost

William D Lawson
 

My moms machine has never had an issue with putting on the embroidery unit. I think she just got something in it that caused the thingy to crinkle up.  


Sent from Frontier Yahoo Mail for iPhone

On Friday, December 27, 2019, 9:49 AM, Cheryl Paul <capaul@...> wrote:

When I had my 12000, which I bought in Saskatoon in 2011 when it was launched by Janome.  The embroidery unit never did just click on easily, but as none of my friends had purchased the machine yet at that time, I had no one to compare with “how” this should attach and it was the first Janome that had the embroidery attachment was not a already on the machine.  Anyway long story short, in January 2013 a friend and I went to Arizona for a month and we took our 12000’s with us, as we knew that Mulqueen’s had LOTS of sewing events where we could go and learn all about our machines and embroidery.  Our first order of business on arriving and unloading the van, was to set up our little sewing room.  My attachment would not attach to my machine.  Well I did give it a smack with the flat of my hand to help it alone - just one smack though.  It would not attache, but Elaine’s did, so we immediately know something was not right.  On January 2nd, we were at Mulqueen’s when they opened machine in tow and the attachment too.  It turned out to be on the machine side that the holes where the pins go was crushed.  I don’t believe that I did that, but there is a possibility that I might have.  It turned out that my sewing machine, had to be taken apart and the term use “the head cracked open” to replace the belt that contained the wires and it was about 1 1/2” wide, had to be replaced.  The part was about $100 USD, but the labour was quite steep, however, the folks at Mulqueen’s were very good to me and only charged me a few extra dollars to repair it.  If I’d been home, warranty might have covered the repair, but since I was in another country I had to pay, if I wanted to use the machine for embroidery.  I did agonize over this, but my wonderful husband, brought light into my day and said that I should just look at it as an experience of my trip and fix it there, so that I could enjoy my holiday to the fullest.  I did that and have never regretted it.  I met some very interesting and very nice folks as result and can never give enough thanks to Ken, the technician, for fixing the machine and to the Mulqueen family for looking after me so well.

What I’m trying to say here is that the repair may be more serious than what has been described.  You could help your Mom, if you live close enough to go into the shop with her and find out what the actual repair is and what is involved in fixing it.  If the machine can still be used as a sewing machine, she might want to look at the 550E and just buy that instead of spending so much on a repair.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


Re: How much should it cost

William D Lawson
 

Jim, you are like our knight in shining armor!!!!  I think we should start calling you “Sir Jim”. Thank you for easing my 90 year old mother’s fears that her machine was going to be expensive to fix. At her age, she was not willing to invest that much and not willing to learn to use another to embroider.  Thank you so much for being there for us.


Sent from Frontier Yahoo Mail for iPhone

On Thursday, December 26, 2019, 3:33 PM, Jim Stutsman via Groups.Io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:

It sounds like they are quoting her the cost of replacing the entire embroidery carriage. What's actually wrong is the film cover over the mechanism. It doesn't take much debris (or bad luck) for it to jam and wrinkle up like an accordion. This part is easily replaced and should not cost more than a few dollars and an hour of labor, certainly not more than $100. Either the shop has had little or no training on service, or they are taking unfair advantage. If no other dealer is available, it would be far cheaper to just have it sent to Janome for repair.


Re: How much should it cost

Cheryl Paul
 

When I had my 12000, which I bought in Saskatoon in 2011 when it was launched by Janome. The embroidery unit never did just click on easily, but as none of my friends had purchased the machine yet at that time, I had no one to compare with “how” this should attach and it was the first Janome that had the embroidery attachment was not a already on the machine. Anyway long story short, in January 2013 a friend and I went to Arizona for a month and we took our 12000’s with us, as we knew that Mulqueen’s had LOTS of sewing events where we could go and learn all about our machines and embroidery. Our first order of business on arriving and unloading the van, was to set up our little sewing room. My attachment would not attach to my machine. Well I did give it a smack with the flat of my hand to help it alone - just one smack though. It would not attache, but Elaine’s did, so we immediately know something was not right. On January 2nd, we were at Mulqueen’s when they opened machine in tow and the attachment too. It turned out to be on the machine side that the holes where the pins go was crushed. I don’t believe that I did that, but there is a possibility that I might have. It turned out that my sewing machine, had to be taken apart and the term use “the head cracked open” to replace the belt that contained the wires and it was about 1 1/2” wide, had to be replaced. The part was about $100 USD, but the labour was quite steep, however, the folks at Mulqueen’s were very good to me and only charged me a few extra dollars to repair it. If I’d been home, warranty might have covered the repair, but since I was in another country I had to pay, if I wanted to use the machine for embroidery. I did agonize over this, but my wonderful husband, brought light into my day and said that I should just look at it as an experience of my trip and fix it there, so that I could enjoy my holiday to the fullest. I did that and have never regretted it. I met some very interesting and very nice folks as result and can never give enough thanks to Ken, the technician, for fixing the machine and to the Mulqueen family for looking after me so well.

What I’m trying to say here is that the repair may be more serious than what has been described. You could help your Mom, if you live close enough to go into the shop with her and find out what the actual repair is and what is involved in fixing it. If the machine can still be used as a sewing machine, she might want to look at the 550E and just buy that instead of spending so much on a repair.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


Re: Two more questions

bhoryn
 

Great idea.     Thank you 


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On Thursday, December 26, 2019, 1:07 PM, Else via Groups.Io <hansenhgh@...> wrote:

Hello
I use the last thread on the bobbins when I make applikationa. I put then bobbin on as top thread when I sew the fabric on and embroidery thread to the decorative- and satinstitches.
Else Marie, Denmark 

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Den 26. dec. 2019 kl. 15.12 skrev bhoryn via Groups.Io <bhoryn@...>:

 Hello Marg.    I think I will turn the bobbin sensor off as you do as I find that using the lowest setting (.5) I still end up with lots of wasted thread on the bobbin.  As I use a PFAFF machine for regular sewing I can’t use the left over thread on the bobbin.   I’ve been winding my own bobbins but may order some Janome pre-wound on line now that Christmas is over.      Thanks for the information about when you change the needle on your machine.

Beth in Ont. 


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On Wednesday, December 25, 2019, 11:04 AM, marjackpot@... via Groups.Io <marjackpot@...> wrote:

I change the needle in all the machines every 5th bobbin.  When using WSS or a Batik in the 8200 I will change the needle more often, I just listen to the sound it makes.
I have turned the bobbin sensor off, I use pre-wound bobbins so I want to use every little bit of thread.
Have fun with your machine.

Marge in Fl.

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