Date   

bobbins breaking

Paula Peraino
 

Hello,
I recently had my 15000 serviced and yeah the needle threader finally works.  But, I've had two bobbins break -- not the bobbin thread, the bottom of the plastic bobbin.  What could be causing this? Thanks


Re: Thick Seams

Cheryl Paul
 

I have several Janome machines from a 4120, S9, 15000 and my new M7 and I’ve been with Janome for over 35 years - way before they had the built in Acufeed/Acuflex systems. For sewing those pillow cases, I’ve sewn many and did them on various machines and never had the problem you seem to be having. I used my regular “A” foot that usually comes on the machine out of the box. I didn’t break any needles and probably was using a Schmetz 12 or Janome 11 again the ordinary needles for most sewing. What I did when I got to those thicker places in the seam, was to slow down, and keep hold of the fabric on the back and front - I didn’t pull, just guided the fabric through. If on occasion the machine didn’t move, I would lift the foot (this was before I knew “how” to use the little button on the side of the A foot) and gently guide the fabric up under the needle. A pain the backside to be sure, but it worked and I got my seam sewn. I want to say that even my little 4120 and previous to this my Jam Platinum 760 would sew through a pillowcase french seam at the cuff with a flange added to the cuff with no problems. Just keep trying - you’ll get your machine to work for you and then you’ll love it.

Now you are going to ask, “How could you have had a Janome with that little button feature for 35 years and NOT know how to use it. Well, long story short, I lived in Northern Saskatchewan 150 miles from the nearest city and it wasn’t a big place, but my dealer was there. we only went into the city about a dozen times a year and some of those were after business hours to visit our parents, who lived further away. Our trip was 150 miles with NO towns and 100 of those was forest with just the road going through.

Back to the problem. What kind of needles are you using, Your 14000 should handle what you are sewing - after all it is quilting cotton, right, and usually that isn’t a difficult fabric to deal with. If you watch the video link that Jim sent and follow those guide lines your problems should be solved.

Now to the M7 machine. At one dealers, I decided to try the demo machine and put 12 layers of denim under the needle - that was not a good idea as the needle broke, the machine sang a nasty little tune and jammed. I was very embarrassed, because we had been told that it would sew 9 layers without a problem, but I HAD to push the envelope. I did confess to the dealer and her technician what had happened so that the machine could be checked for burrs in the needle plate and the timing. I know that it still worked, but I wasn’t going to be a bad person who did something that might have caused a problem down the road, when this machine left the store at a demo sell off. I would attempt those layers again, but I think I would “hand walk” the needle through the few stitches that needed to be made in an actual seam situation. We are after all using a sewing machine with a fine needle, even if it is a size 20 - it isn’t a drill we’re operating. I love my M7 and think it will do everything and more than I would ever expect to make on a sewing machine. The lighting is phenomenal and I think that’s almost the most important thing for any of us that are in our “better years” and still have some vision.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


Re: Thick Seams

Mary Jo Hirsch
 

Diane hope all goes well with your healing process.  Guess no Christmas cookies for Jim!   Holiday wishes.

On Wed, Dec 18, 2019 at 9:44 AM J Fraker <frakersfunnyfarm@...> wrote:
Here's a very good YouTube video on how to use it.


On Wed, Dec 18, 2019, 9:58 AM Pixey via Groups.Io <pixeyam=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
So when Diane’s wrist heals (which I was really sorry to hear about), it would be nice to have a video in either FootBook or the My15000 app that shows how to use the “hump jumper”, which I guess is called the “button shank plate” in the instruction manual.  It has always sort of confused me on how to actually use it.

Thanks,
Pixey


On Dec 17, 2019, at 1:22 PM, J Fraker <frakersfunnyfarm@...> wrote:

True, the foot should hold up, but since it doesn't, you can use the hump jumper. Mine came with one, I'm assuming they all did.

On Tue, Dec 17, 2019, 2:06 PM Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:
Jim--I saw your input re: the Janome A foot. Went to the  Foot Book video and see that the person displaying the A foot and describing the purpose of the small spring/button part of the foot. Like the lady in the video, my A foot has also lost its ability to stay in the "in" position. I have had that foot around 3 years, and it is not performing well after this relatively short time period.  I don't mean to be a complainer, but ........they just don't make things the way they used to!!   Aside from the aforementioned failure, the A foot functions well on flat seams.    Kathy S. Camas WA

--
null


Re: Thick Seams

J Fraker
 

Here's a very good YouTube video on how to use it.


On Wed, Dec 18, 2019, 9:58 AM Pixey via Groups.Io <pixeyam=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
So when Diane’s wrist heals (which I was really sorry to hear about), it would be nice to have a video in either FootBook or the My15000 app that shows how to use the “hump jumper”, which I guess is called the “button shank plate” in the instruction manual.  It has always sort of confused me on how to actually use it.

Thanks,
Pixey


On Dec 17, 2019, at 1:22 PM, J Fraker <frakersfunnyfarm@...> wrote:

True, the foot should hold up, but since it doesn't, you can use the hump jumper. Mine came with one, I'm assuming they all did.

On Tue, Dec 17, 2019, 2:06 PM Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:
Jim--I saw your input re: the Janome A foot. Went to the  Foot Book video and see that the person displaying the A foot and describing the purpose of the small spring/button part of the foot. Like the lady in the video, my A foot has also lost its ability to stay in the "in" position. I have had that foot around 3 years, and it is not performing well after this relatively short time period.  I don't mean to be a complainer, but ........they just don't make things the way they used to!!   Aside from the aforementioned failure, the A foot functions well on flat seams.    Kathy S. Camas WA


Re: Thick Seams

Pixey
 

So when Diane’s wrist heals (which I was really sorry to hear about), it would be nice to have a video in either FootBook or the My15000 app that shows how to use the “hump jumper”, which I guess is called the “button shank plate” in the instruction manual.  It has always sort of confused me on how to actually use it.

Thanks,
Pixey


On Dec 17, 2019, at 1:22 PM, J Fraker <frakersfunnyfarm@...> wrote:

True, the foot should hold up, but since it doesn't, you can use the hump jumper. Mine came with one, I'm assuming they all did.

On Tue, Dec 17, 2019, 2:06 PM Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:
Jim--I saw your input re: the Janome A foot. Went to the  Foot Book video and see that the person displaying the A foot and describing the purpose of the small spring/button part of the foot. Like the lady in the video, my A foot has also lost its ability to stay in the "in" position. I have had that foot around 3 years, and it is not performing well after this relatively short time period.  I don't mean to be a complainer, but ........they just don't make things the way they used to!!   Aside from the aforementioned failure, the A foot functions well on flat seams.    Kathy S. Camas WA


Re: Thick Seams

J Fraker
 

True, the foot should hold up, but since it doesn't, you can use the hump jumper. Mine came with one, I'm assuming they all did.


On Tue, Dec 17, 2019, 2:06 PM Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:
Jim--I saw your input re: the Janome A foot. Went to the  Foot Book video and see that the person displaying the A foot and describing the purpose of the small spring/button part of the foot. Like the lady in the video, my A foot has also lost its ability to stay in the "in" position. I have had that foot around 3 years, and it is not performing well after this relatively short time period.  I don't mean to be a complainer, but ........they just don't make things the way they used to!!   Aside from the aforementioned failure, the A foot functions well on flat seams.    Kathy S. Camas WA


Re: Thick Seams

Pam Davison
 

What's interesting is Janome touted the new M7 as being able to go through all of these layers of denim but when you actually watch the video the foot stays pretty level but if you try to Stitch through a lot of layers like you normally do where everything is not level it doesn't have that kind of penetration power however I did find that the new M7 has more penetration power than my other machines I have the Janome 15000 and the 6700.  I ended up buying the hd9 for that specific reason so I didn't have to fight with going through thick layers and I didn't want to chance messing up my other machines.

I was disappointed with Janome because they never responded to my comment.  On their Instagram account they posted the new M7 showing it goes through all these layers and when I added a comment saying I was not able to accomplish that and asked were their any special settings needed I never got a response.


From: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io> on behalf of Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...>
Sent: Tuesday, December 17, 2019 9:20:03 AM
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io <onlinesewing-janome@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [onlinesewing-janome] Thick Seams
 
Terry--I feel your pain. While I do not have the same machine that you do, I find that my Skyline 7 balks at the thicker seams, like your flannel pillowcases, etc. I have found that Janome has represents their machines as being able to handle just about anything, including thick seams, tote bag and purse projects (out of cottons or home dec fabrics), etc. But I find that in reality it is just not so. I held onto my older workhorse from another brand partly for sentimental reasons, but I have had to pull that machine out to do the heavier tasks, even including hems on jeans and the like. Have you tried using the "hump jumper" accessory that probably came with your machine.? Janome calls it something else, and it is designed to help the foot go over the thicker parts,   You can also try just carefully pressing down on the front of the foot  with your index finger as it mounts the hump of the seam. I find that works sometimes. The idea is to keep the foot level as it passes over the hump. If you are using the Accu-Feed walking foot--be sure that the hook that holds the foot in place to the needle bar is FULLY engaged. It often will pop fully--or partially --out, rendering the walking foot useless. I have seen other people report this problem, but have no solution for it, other than a temporary fix of placing a strip of strong tape over the slot that the hook fits into. It is not an ideal fix, but until (or unless) Janome comes up with a retro-fit clamp or clip to ensure the hook stays seated in place, that is the best I can do.  Good luck. Let the Group know if any of these suggestions work for you.  Kathy S   Camas WA


Re: Thick Seams

Donna Clendaniel
 

Good morning to all. 

This is my experience.      I have the 15000 and have made many canvas tote bags with thick seams. I used a denim needle, most of the time I was able to sew over the thick seams and the heavy cotton webbing (handles)  I did go slow.  The times the machine balked at the seams, I ended up taking a small hammer and hammering the seams a bit flatter.  I did remove the bag from my machine and hammered/pounded the thick seam with a few whacks, on a hard service.  No damage was created to the bag or my counter top.  Put the bag back under the needle sewed slowly and all was good.  I didn't realize about the pressure foot adjustment on foot A, that probably would have helped as well.  I will try that on the next bag.  I can not say enough about my 15000. It has gone from sewing canvas tote bags, Multi-layers Christmas stockings and some embroidery of items. All was good, as expected. I paid particular attention to keeping the bobbin area clean with each bobbin change. Canvas frays and is very very linty, the double faced pre-quilted fabric I used inside the stocking is also very linty.  So again I cleaned the bobbin area constantly. 
the 15000 has been a good workhorse machine.  Good luck to all.

On December 17, 2019 at 10:20 AM Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:

Terry--I feel your pain. While I do not have the same machine that you do, I find that my Skyline 7 balks at the thicker seams, like your flannel pillowcases, etc. I have found that Janome has represents their machines as being able to handle just about anything, including thick seams, tote bag and purse projects (out of cottons or home dec fabrics), etc. But I find that in reality it is just not so. I held onto my older workhorse from another brand partly for sentimental reasons, but I have had to pull that machine out to do the heavier tasks, even including hems on jeans and the like. Have you tried using the "hump jumper" accessory that probably came with your machine.? Janome calls it something else, and it is designed to help the foot go over the thicker parts,   You can also try just carefully pressing down on the front of the foot  with your index finger as it mounts the hump of the seam. I find that works sometimes. The idea is to keep the foot level as it passes over the hump. If you are using the Accu-Feed walking foot--be sure that the hook that holds the foot in place to the needle bar is FULLY engaged. It often will pop fully--or partially --out, rendering the walking foot useless. I have seen other people report this problem, but have no solution for it, other than a temporary fix of placing a strip of strong tape over the slot that the hook fits into. It is not an ideal fix, but until (or unless) Janome comes up with a retro-fit clamp or clip to ensure the hook stays seated in place, that is the best I can do.  Good luck. Let the Group know if any of these suggestions work for you.  Kathy S   Camas WA

 


Re: Thick Seams

Lyn Quine
 

I have a Janome 6600P semi industrial and it copes with all my heavy stuff.  I wouldn’t put heavy stuff on my 12000 or my 15000, (similar to the 14000), I think they need lighter work on them, because they aren’t just sewing machines, they are combination machines.  Prefer to us the metal bodied 6600P for the really heavy stuff, it takes it all without any hesitation and has an inbuilt walking foot with interchangeable feet.  I take it to my quilting workshops.  Breaking needles and the heavier, thicker seams, I think is risking knocking the timing out, which means a trip to the dealer.  I make sure I use a big needle for thick seams like a 90/14 or 100/16, longer stitch, slow the machine (even with the 6600P), adjust the foot pressure and its fine.  When I discussed this with the dealer he didn’t think very heavy or thick seams a good idea on the ‘fancy’ combination machines was a good idea.  I got my 6600 as an ex demo and it is a great machines.  


On 17 Dec 2019, at 15:21, Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:

Terry--I feel your pain. While I do not have the same machine that you do, I find that my Skyline 7 balks at the thicker seams, like your flannel pillowcases, etc. I have found that Janome has represents their machines as being able to handle just about anything, including thick seams, tote bag and purse projects (out of cottons or home dec fabrics), etc. But I find that in reality it is just not so. I held onto my older workhorse from another brand partly for sentimental reasons, but I have had to pull that machine out to do the heavier tasks, even including hems on jeans and the like. Have you tried using the "hump jumper" accessory that probably came with your machine.? Janome calls it something else, and it is designed to help the foot go over the thicker parts,   You can also try just carefully pressing down on the front of the foot  with your index finger as it mounts the hump of the seam. I find that works sometimes. The idea is to keep the foot level as it passes over the hump. If you are using the Accu-Feed walking foot--be sure that the hook that holds the foot in place to the needle bar is FULLY engaged. It often will pop fully--or partially --out, rendering the walking foot useless. I have seen other people report this problem, but have no solution for it, other than a temporary fix of placing a strip of strong tape over the slot that the hook fits into. It is not an ideal fix, but until (or unless) Janome comes up with a retro-fit clamp or clip to ensure the hook stays seated in place, that is the best I can do.  Good luck. Let the Group know if any of these suggestions work for you.  Kathy S   Camas WA


Re: Thick Seams

Kathy Strabel
 

Jim--I saw your input re: the Janome A foot. Went to the  Foot Book video and see that the person displaying the A foot and describing the purpose of the small spring/button part of the foot. Like the lady in the video, my A foot has also lost its ability to stay in the "in" position. I have had that foot around 3 years, and it is not performing well after this relatively short time period.  I don't mean to be a complainer, but ........they just don't make things the way they used to!!   Aside from the aforementioned failure, the A foot functions well on flat seams.    Kathy S. Camas WA


Re: Thick Seams

Kathy Strabel
 

Terry--I feel your pain. While I do not have the same machine that you do, I find that my Skyline 7 balks at the thicker seams, like your flannel pillowcases, etc. I have found that Janome has represents their machines as being able to handle just about anything, including thick seams, tote bag and purse projects (out of cottons or home dec fabrics), etc. But I find that in reality it is just not so. I held onto my older workhorse from another brand partly for sentimental reasons, but I have had to pull that machine out to do the heavier tasks, even including hems on jeans and the like. Have you tried using the "hump jumper" accessory that probably came with your machine.? Janome calls it something else, and it is designed to help the foot go over the thicker parts,   You can also try just carefully pressing down on the front of the foot  with your index finger as it mounts the hump of the seam. I find that works sometimes. The idea is to keep the foot level as it passes over the hump. If you are using the Accu-Feed walking foot--be sure that the hook that holds the foot in place to the needle bar is FULLY engaged. It often will pop fully--or partially --out, rendering the walking foot useless. I have seen other people report this problem, but have no solution for it, other than a temporary fix of placing a strip of strong tape over the slot that the hook fits into. It is not an ideal fix, but until (or unless) Janome comes up with a retro-fit clamp or clip to ensure the hook stays seated in place, that is the best I can do.  Good luck. Let the Group know if any of these suggestions work for you.  Kathy S   Camas WA


Re: Thick Seams

Jim Stutsman
 

Welcome to the group Terry! This is a very common problem for new Janome owners. There's actually a feature built into the A presser foot that helps. Rather than try to explain it, I have extracted the relevant video from our FootBook app so you can see it:

https://youtu.be/BN_2CseaUyY


Thick Seams

terryj@...
 

Can someone please tell me their secret for sewing thick seams on their Janome machine?  I've been making flannel pillowcases for the kids for many, many years and my Viking Sapphire never had a problem sewing the thick french seams (two layers of pillow body, two layers of cuff and two layers of accent band).  I tried to make two pillowcases today, on my 14000, which resulted in three broken needles and at least one machine jam that worried me.  For the second pillow case, I even used the dual feed foot and it also stopped at the bottom of the thick seam - wouldn't climb over it without my forcing it which means broken needles.  I adjusted the foot pressure, lengthened the stitch and stitched slowly but it didn't help.  I'm beyond frustrated.  I bought this new machine because I had heard so many good things about how well it feeds fabric and now I'm ready to throw it out the window.  I don't want to have to keep setting up my Viking for sewing - I want to use my new machine for everything.  Ugh...

On the plus side - I really like the embroidery unit.  I used it to embroider their names on the cuffs of the pillowcases and it did it beautifully.

Thank you!

Terry from Maine


Re: Janome 550e

Jim Stutsman
 

No. The only place you could possibly oil is the wick under the bobbin case. A couple of drops of oil in there once or twice a year is more than sufficient. All other oiling can and should be done by your dealer during servicing.


Re: Janome 550e

Mary Jo Hirsch
 

Does the 15000 require oiling by user?

On Mon, Dec 16, 2019 at 10:50 AM Jim Stutsman via Groups.Io <onlinesewing=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
I'm going to jump in here for a comment. Yes, until now most of Janome's non-commercial machines did not require oiling. This was because the parts with metal-on-metal contact are manufactured with a process that embeds oil in the metal. As the machine is used, when friction gets to a certain point the heat will bring the embedded oil to the surface, thereby "self-lubricating" the machine. This process was accompanied by the presumption that home machines would not get an extraordinary amount of use, and would be presented to the dealer for servicing on a regular basis. The dealer could then take care of oiling as needed.

That plan worked pretty well for the 8000, the first Janome consumer machine to do embroidery, and it was also working for the 9000. However when the 10000 came out it was possible to make larger designs, as well as use designs digitized by others. The price of the machine was low enough that a lot of people used it to go into the embroidery business. Running a machine for hours every single day went well beyond the duty cycle that the engineers had planned on. It was further complicated by a drive system that used a shaft in a bushing instead of a ball bearing. Machines started locking up due to lack of oil, and that in turn was destroying the bushing. The repair is dirty, difficult, and time consuming. I did so many of them that I eventually got it down to 30 minutes. This same problem also showed up in the 300E, 350E, 9400, and 9700.

I think with the 500E and later, Janome now realizes that people will use these machines commercially even though they are not sold for that purpose. They can exclude commercial use from the warranty, but it's pretty hard to prove and telling a customer her warranty has been invalidated is not a good strategy for repeat business. So now they are trying to avoid trouble by just coming out and advising the user to oil the machine. This is line with the MB-4 and MB-7 commercial machines which are supposed to be oiled frequently, and come with oil. It's not a big deal, but the key thing about oiling machines is MODERATION. Excess oil is messy and can stain fabric. A single drop is usually ample, with the exception of the wick which can get a bit more IF IT IS DRY. Once a month for daily use is probably also OK, but if you use it only a few times a week you could probably stretch it to 3 months or more. When oiling a shaft (Page 61, items 4, 5, & 6) you can put a drop of oil on a Q-Tip and rub that on the shaft. This will keep the oil from getting all over.

--
null


Re: Customizer 11000

Nyssa Lanzafame
 

Also, you should be able to go to your local library for this :)  i know that in the scheme of buying this machine it is a drop in the hat ( or like me it was a years long savings endeavor, and if you actually had the money you would rather buy thread LOL!)  Either way, if this is the one time in months that you will need it, we can keep some electronics out of landfills  by using shared resources :)

Just a thought.  as i did this it was the first time i'd needed a drive in several years, and i have not needed one again since!  though Janome did send me the link via email, for the upgrade for my machine...so they may be able to send you a link if you reach out to them.


Re: Customizer 11000

Pixey
 

I am not sure about an Embroidery Editor download.  But here a link on YouTube of the instructional video.

I would concur that you should probably invest in a USB plug in external CD/DVD drive.  They are not that expensive and while a lot of the design vendors have gone to downloads, some brands still come only on CDs. 

Pixey



On Dec 15, 2019, at 2:06 PM, Janet Cicerano <janet.cicerano@...> wrote:

Hello, I recently purchased the 500e and have not used it yet.  My fairly new laptop does not have a CD/DVD player and I do not currently own an external player.  Is it possible to download the information from a website that is on the DVD that came with the 500e?
Janet

On Fri, Dec 13, 2019 at 6:14 PM Jim Stutsman via Groups.Io <onlinesewing=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Mel, welcome to the group! Your 500E actually comes with a CD/DVD that contains the software you will need for your machine. Customizer 11000 is older software that was originally created for the Memory Craft 11000, then later modified to include the 350E. It won't do a thing for you, and actually has issues with Windows 10 using USB. When you get your machine install the software that came with it, and then if you have questions you can ask them here. On the 550E I believe the software is called "AcuTools", but I don't know what it is on the 500E. You can let us know that too!


Re: Janome 550e

Pixey
 

You might also check the group archives.  I think someone previously posted a YouTube link that shows someone oiling the 500e and it was very helpful to me to see how the end panels are removed...two of them are a bit finicky.  The first couple of times were pretty nerve wracking, but now I am more comfortable doing it.

Pixey

On Dec 16, 2019, at 10:45 AM, Jim Stutsman via Groups.Io <onlinesewing@...> wrote:

I'm going to jump in here for a comment. Yes, until now most of Janome's non-commercial machines did not require oiling. This was because the parts with metal-on-metal contact are manufactured with a process that embeds oil in the metal. As the machine is used, when friction gets to a certain point the heat will bring the embedded oil to the surface, thereby "self-lubricating" the machine. This process was accompanied by the presumption that home machines would not get an extraordinary amount of use, and would be presented to the dealer for servicing on a regular basis. The dealer could then take care of oiling as needed.

That plan worked pretty well for the 8000, the first Janome consumer machine to do embroidery, and it was also working for the 9000. However when the 10000 came out it was possible to make larger designs, as well as use designs digitized by others. The price of the machine was low enough that a lot of people used it to go into the embroidery business. Running a machine for hours every single day went well beyond the duty cycle that the engineers had planned on. It was further complicated by a drive system that used a shaft in a bushing instead of a ball bearing. Machines started locking up due to lack of oil, and that in turn was destroying the bushing. The repair is dirty, difficult, and time consuming. I did so many of them that I eventually got it down to 30 minutes. This same problem also showed up in the 300E, 350E, 9400, and 9700.

I think with the 500E and later, Janome now realizes that people will use these machines commercially even though they are not sold for that purpose. They can exclude commercial use from the warranty, but it's pretty hard to prove and telling a customer her warranty has been invalidated is not a good strategy for repeat business. So now they are trying to avoid trouble by just coming out and advising the user to oil the machine. This is line with the MB-4 and MB-7 commercial machines which are supposed to be oiled frequently, and come with oil. It's not a big deal, but the key thing about oiling machines is MODERATION. Excess oil is messy and can stain fabric. A single drop is usually ample, with the exception of the wick which can get a bit more IF IT IS DRY. Once a month for daily use is probably also OK, but if you use it only a few times a week you could probably stretch it to 3 months or more. When oiling a shaft (Page 61, items 4, 5, & 6) you can put a drop of oil on a Q-Tip and rub that on the shaft. This will keep the oil from getting all over.


Re: Janome 550e

Jim Stutsman
 

I'm going to jump in here for a comment. Yes, until now most of Janome's non-commercial machines did not require oiling. This was because the parts with metal-on-metal contact are manufactured with a process that embeds oil in the metal. As the machine is used, when friction gets to a certain point the heat will bring the embedded oil to the surface, thereby "self-lubricating" the machine. This process was accompanied by the presumption that home machines would not get an extraordinary amount of use, and would be presented to the dealer for servicing on a regular basis. The dealer could then take care of oiling as needed.

That plan worked pretty well for the 8000, the first Janome consumer machine to do embroidery, and it was also working for the 9000. However when the 10000 came out it was possible to make larger designs, as well as use designs digitized by others. The price of the machine was low enough that a lot of people used it to go into the embroidery business. Running a machine for hours every single day went well beyond the duty cycle that the engineers had planned on. It was further complicated by a drive system that used a shaft in a bushing instead of a ball bearing. Machines started locking up due to lack of oil, and that in turn was destroying the bushing. The repair is dirty, difficult, and time consuming. I did so many of them that I eventually got it down to 30 minutes. This same problem also showed up in the 300E, 350E, 9400, and 9700.

I think with the 500E and later, Janome now realizes that people will use these machines commercially even though they are not sold for that purpose. They can exclude commercial use from the warranty, but it's pretty hard to prove and telling a customer her warranty has been invalidated is not a good strategy for repeat business. So now they are trying to avoid trouble by just coming out and advising the user to oil the machine. This is line with the MB-4 and MB-7 commercial machines which are supposed to be oiled frequently, and come with oil. It's not a big deal, but the key thing about oiling machines is MODERATION. Excess oil is messy and can stain fabric. A single drop is usually ample, with the exception of the wick which can get a bit more IF IT IS DRY. Once a month for daily use is probably also OK, but if you use it only a few times a week you could probably stretch it to 3 months or more. When oiling a shaft (Page 61, items 4, 5, & 6) you can put a drop of oil on a Q-Tip and rub that on the shaft. This will keep the oil from getting all over.


Re: Janome 550e

bhoryn
 

Hi Kathy.      Just came up for a cup of tea and checked this site.   Yes my 550e needs oiling.  Dealer didn’t mention it but the instructions in the book did.     Haven’t attempted it yet but will do so when Christmas things are done.     Looks quite involved 🥴
 
Each time I use the machine I find things I quite like and the odd thing I liked better on my old PFAFF.   
 

On Monday, December 16, 2019, 9:44 AM, Kathy Strabel <ksbappa@...> wrote:

Hope you enjoy your 550E, I have the 500E and looked at the 550E when it first came out. I believe they are basically the same machine, but with some different accessories--a larger hoop, maybe some additional things. Did you have to oil your machine when you first set it up? I was very surprised that my 500E requires the user to oil it every month, if it is used on a daily basis. I use mine each week, but not every day, so I do it a bit less. None of the pre-sale literature I saw, nor any of the sales people ever mentioned the oiling requirement. Hmmmmmmm.  It would have been nice to have had that information up front. It has not been a deal-breaker, but it should have been disclosed. I wonder if the newer 550E also has this requirement?  Kathy Strabel  Camas WA

 
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Have a good one!
Kathy Strabel




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