Date   

Re: Quilting question

J Fraker
 

I used to watch Sewing With Nancy all the time, and she said never use that shiny gray stuff for an ironing board cover because it is sort of waterproof.  If you are using steam, you need a cover that is cotton so the excess steam that goes through the piece you are ironing will be absorbed into the cover and not leave a wet spot.  I have to say, I agree with this as I have tried it both ways.

On Mon, Mar 12, 2018 at 10:18 PM, Narda Poulin via Groups.Io <nardapoulin@...> wrote:
I have covered my ironing board a few times and i just use leftover cotton fabric from quilts. You can buy actual iron board covering ( the shiny grey stuff) I don’t know where though. I’m sure if you asked Google they would give you an answer.lol



Everything about Janome needles

cas <cassweet@...>
 


Re: Tension

Virginia
 

Ypur top thread is supposed to pull to the bottom.  That is correct. The top is all you should see on the yop
 Do not know what you mean by loose. Are you using a spool stand?
 
 
 
Sent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S7.
 

-------- Original message --------
From: danlin@...
Date: 3/13/18 4:52 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Subject: [onlinesewing-janome] Tension
 
I have the 12000 and am having problems with the tension in embroidery mode only. There is none! The thread pulls through loosely whether the foot is down or up. The top thread is what you see on the underneath, very little bobin thread. In the sewing mode no problems. Does anyone know what could be causing this? 
--
LindaB


Re: Tension

Jim Stutsman
 

Are you changing bobbin cases for embroidery? Even if you are, it's probably a top tension issue. Since the mechanism is the same for both sewing and embroidery, it has to be due to the machine software making it looser. First check your settings in the Embroidery SET screen. Make sure the tension hasn't been set toward the minus. Also make sure that the thread is actually going into the tension when threading for embroidery - use the LOCK button before threading. If none of that pans out, then I would download and install/reinstall the 1.20 machine update. It's rare, but something in the machine programming may have gotten glitched, particularly if there were power issues at some point. It only takes a single bit to change between 0 and 1 to drastically change how the machine operates. If that doesn't clear it up, see your dealer for a checkup.


Re: zigzag question

Mary E
 

thanks Jim. I checked for scratches and there were none, and thoroughly cleaned out the bobbin case. I used a beading needle to go through the spring coils, and although I didn't see any lint, the tension on the zigzag is much better. I have it set 2.2
Mary

On Tue, Mar 13, 2018 at 9:26 AM, <onlinesewing@...> wrote:
A couple of things to check:

  1. Remove the regular bobbin case and inspect it top and bottom. Look for any kind of roughness. Sometimes a broken needle pierces the case and causes a bump. This will appear like whacky tension and may make a clicking sound as you sew.
  2. Look at the regular case from the top. You'll see a thin metal spring running from the 6 o'clock position to about the 8 o'clock position. Sometimes thread lint will ball up at the 8 o'clock end, forcing the spring out a bit. That cause the tension to be off. Use the thinnest, finest needle you have to gently tease the lint ball out from behind the spring. This will restore normal tension.



Tension

LindaB 1
 

I have the 12000 and am having problems with the tension in embroidery mode only. There is none! The thread pulls through loosely whether the foot is down or up. The top thread is what you see on the underneath, very little bobin thread. In the sewing mode no problems. Does anyone know what could be causing this? 
--
LindaB


Re: zigzag question

Jim Stutsman
 

A couple of things to check:

  1. Remove the regular bobbin case and inspect it top and bottom. Look for any kind of roughness. Sometimes a broken needle pierces the case and causes a bump. This will appear like whacky tension and may make a clicking sound as you sew.
  2. Look at the regular case from the top. You'll see a thin metal spring running from the 6 o'clock position to about the 8 o'clock position. Sometimes thread lint will ball up at the 8 o'clock end, forcing the spring out a bit. That cause the tension to be off. Use the thinnest, finest needle you have to gently tease the lint ball out from behind the spring. This will restore normal tension.


zigzag question

Mary E
 

I wonder if anyone else has had this issue. When I use the regular bobbin case, my zigzag stitches tend to be inconsistent in tension, with some tight and others the bobbin thread showing. I tried adjusting the tension as per the manual and even stitched out a set of test runs but the tension makes not difference. So then I switched to the yellow dot bobbin and got perfectly tight tension the first time.
Any ideas why this is happening? I sew for a home designer and the zigzag stitch around the label has to be perfect.
Mary E


Re: Quilting question

Claire Schutz
 

I have made ironing board covers from heavy duty muslin. If I can find the name of the company which was in Oregon, they also had padding to go under it.  Its been over 25 yrs and they are still fine and yes, I do a lot of ironing even for clothes, tablecloths, etc. Should I find the name will let all know.  This is the best cover ever, worth the cost, Claire S.

On 3/12/2018 2:38 PM, Joyce VanAtta via Groups.Io wrote:
A lady in my quilt group said in order to really stitch in the ditch,
the seams should be pressed open in order to have a "ditch".
It makes sense when I think about it.
She did not mention anything about stitch length.

I made a half square triangle quilt and had a question about the bulk
in the seams.  Again, someone in class said she presses her seams
open then too.  I will have to try that next time.

Does anyone have a suggestion about what fabrics will make a
good ironing board cover??  My ironing board is very old, so
it is larger than the ones out there now, so none of those covers
will work.

Thanks,
Joyce 


Re: Ironing Board Cover

J Fraker
 

I bought a folding table at Lowe's that is two feet by four feet with a hard plastic top.  It is a perfect ironing board because I can press a full 44" width of fabric on it.  It has four legs, so is also a lot more sturdy than a regular ironing board.  It wasn't quite as high as I wanted, so I cut some pieces of 1" PVC pipe and slipped them over the table legs and put chair boots on the bottom of the PVC.  I put three layers of polyester batting on top, then used an old sheet in a light tan floral fabric to make the cover.  I put a drawstring in the cover so it is easy to remove for washing.  This is by far the best ironing board I've ever had, especially great for quilting.

On Mon, Mar 12, 2018 at 7:10 PM, Cat - N via Groups.Io <navillusc@...> wrote:
As I understand it, a fabric capable of withstanding higher heat should be chosen for covering ironing boards.  There is a fabric that can be purchased, either pre-quilted or not...Joann's and other fabric outlets sell it...or 100% cotton can be used.  Cotton will, of course, scorch or worse if an iron sole plate is set on it and allowed to just stay in place, however, I have made a travel, roll-up pressing cloth using cotton and two layers of Insul-Brite, and I have had no issues with it for the little I use it.  I only press on the 'plain' side...there is jumbo rick rack on the 'pretty' (and quilted) side, and it is a poly/cotton blend so I do not want to put heat on the rick rack.

- Cat (FL)

...

Does anyone have a suggestion about what fabrics will make a
good ironing board cover??  My ironing board is very old, so
it is larger than the ones out there now, so none of those covers
will work.

Thanks,
Joyce 



Re: Quilting question

Narda Poulin
 

I have covered my ironing board a few times and i just use leftover cotton fabric from quilts. You can buy actual iron board covering ( the shiny grey stuff) I don’t know where though. I’m sure if you asked Google they would give you an answer.lol


Re: Quilting question

Linda Wunder
 

What if when “stitching in the ditch” with seams pressed open you used one of the decorative stitches like An S type which might look nice and also secure both sides equally. It might be a little wonky for some but I like to try different fun things rather than always play by the rules. 


Re: Quilting question

cas <cassweet@...>
 

If you’re going to press your HSTs open you may want to use a very short stitch at the ends and extend it past the cloth a stitch or two.

 

I made an ironing board cover from ironing board fabric found in the specialty fabric aisle at Joann’s fabrics.  It’s gray and meant for ironing boards.  I put batting under it, and a pretty quilt fabric over it.  Mine is stapled underneath a very large board and can be removed to wash it.

 

Mine just got a makeover.  I guess hubby decided I needed a switch from the funkadelic fabric I had on there, with bright wavy blotches of every color.  He bought a sedate floral fabric which I also love.

 

It’s so funny.  The first time I pressed white cloth on it I thought the white was old and yellowed – in blotches.  I eventually realized it was the green of the fabric showing through.  Of course I washed the white fabric a couple of times first. 

J

Cas


Re: Ironing Board Cover

Cat - N
 

As I understand it, a fabric capable of withstanding higher heat should be chosen for covering ironing boards.  There is a fabric that can be purchased, either pre-quilted or not...Joann's and other fabric outlets sell it...or 100% cotton can be used.  Cotton will, of course, scorch or worse if an iron sole plate is set on it and allowed to just stay in place, however, I have made a travel, roll-up pressing cloth using cotton and two layers of Insul-Brite, and I have had no issues with it for the little I use it.  I only press on the 'plain' side...there is jumbo rick rack on the 'pretty' (and quilted) side, and it is a poly/cotton blend so I do not want to put heat on the rick rack.

- Cat (FL)

...

Does anyone have a suggestion about what fabrics will make a
good ironing board cover??  My ironing board is very old, so
it is larger than the ones out there now, so none of those covers
will work.

Thanks,
Joyce 


Re: Quilting question

Janet
 

I agree if I was only going to be quilting in the ditch. I would iron my seams not opened.      

Janet


On Mar 12, 2018, at 5:19 PM, Shirley Bedard via Groups.Io <craftyquilters@...> wrote:

when your seam is open you are stitching only on threads when they are closed you are stitching on fabric which will hold up longer


Crafty Quilters 13221 Hwy 98     Sebring, Fl 33876 863-658-2148 craftyquilters@...


On Monday, March 12, 2018, 5:17:33 PM EDT, Joyce VanAtta via Groups.Io <shesews4em@...> wrote:


A lady in my quilt group said in order to really stitch in the ditch,
the seams should be pressed open in order to have a "ditch".
It makes sense when I think about it.
She did not mention anything about stitch length.

I made a half square triangle quilt and had a question about the bulk
in the seams.  Again, someone in class said she presses her seams
open then too.  I will have to try that next time.

Does anyone have a suggestion about what fabrics will make a
good ironing board cover??  My ironing board is very old, so
it is larger than the ones out there now, so none of those covers
will work.

Thanks,
Joyce 


Re: Quilting question

Janet
 

Although my quilting in the ditch is kind of wonky. 🤔

Janet


On Mar 12, 2018, at 5:19 PM, Shirley Bedard via Groups.Io <craftyquilters@...> wrote:

when your seam is open you are stitching only on threads when they are closed you are stitching on fabric which will hold up longer


Crafty Quilters 13221 Hwy 98     Sebring, Fl 33876 863-658-2148 craftyquilters@...


On Monday, March 12, 2018, 5:17:33 PM EDT, Joyce VanAtta via Groups.Io <shesews4em@...> wrote:


A lady in my quilt group said in order to really stitch in the ditch,
the seams should be pressed open in order to have a "ditch".
It makes sense when I think about it.
She did not mention anything about stitch length.

I made a half square triangle quilt and had a question about the bulk
in the seams.  Again, someone in class said she presses her seams
open then too.  I will have to try that next time.

Does anyone have a suggestion about what fabrics will make a
good ironing board cover??  My ironing board is very old, so
it is larger than the ones out there now, so none of those covers
will work.

Thanks,
Joyce 


Re: Janome S9 bit frustrated

Mary Mills
 

Thank You!  I will see if previous designs I have from other USB sticks show up, this is such a beautiful machine and is normally very good at loading designs.   Thanks again, regards, Mary


Re: Quilting question

Shirley Bedard
 

when your seam is open you are stitching only on threads when they are closed you are stitching on fabric which will hold up longer


Crafty Quilters 13221 Hwy 98     Sebring, Fl 33876 863-658-2148 craftyquilters@...


On Monday, March 12, 2018, 5:17:33 PM EDT, Joyce VanAtta via Groups.Io <shesews4em@...> wrote:


A lady in my quilt group said in order to really stitch in the ditch,
the seams should be pressed open in order to have a "ditch".
It makes sense when I think about it.
She did not mention anything about stitch length.

I made a half square triangle quilt and had a question about the bulk
in the seams.  Again, someone in class said she presses her seams
open then too.  I will have to try that next time.

Does anyone have a suggestion about what fabrics will make a
good ironing board cover??  My ironing board is very old, so
it is larger than the ones out there now, so none of those covers
will work.

Thanks,
Joyce 


Re: Quilting question

Joyce VanAtta
 

A lady in my quilt group said in order to really stitch in the ditch,
the seams should be pressed open in order to have a "ditch".
It makes sense when I think about it.
She did not mention anything about stitch length.

I made a half square triangle quilt and had a question about the bulk
in the seams.  Again, someone in class said she presses her seams
open then too.  I will have to try that next time.

Does anyone have a suggestion about what fabrics will make a
good ironing board cover??  My ironing board is very old, so
it is larger than the ones out there now, so none of those covers
will work.

Thanks,
Joyce 


Re: Quilting question

Claire Schutz
 

Don't remember who said but there are different reasons for open or to one side depending on the pattern, Claire S.

On 3/11/2018 7:47 PM, J Fraker wrote:
I press to one side most of the time unless there's some unusual spot where it needs to be pressed open.  I find it much more difficult to match points if they are pressed open.

On Sun, Mar 11, 2018 at 4:18 PM, Linda M Robertson <lindamrobertson7@...> wrote:
Just wondering how you quilters deal with seams.
Press to one side or open.  I was watching a Stitch in the Ditch, Leah Day video on YouTube.   And she presses her seams open but also uses a shorter stitch length.

Linda





7721 - 7740 of 29624