Date   

Zigzag stitch

Cynthia Dickerson
 

Sometimes this 15,000, gets on my nerves.!!  I love it don’t get me wrong, but I just want to sew a simple zigzag stitch.  I want to zigzag two pieces of interfacing side by side together.   Something so simple. Usually, but not with this machine.  One stitch has an M and one has an R with no explanation.  So I finally get the machine set to stitch across both pieces of interfacing and the machine will only advance one of the pieces.  The feed dogs will not advanced both pieces evenly.  What the heck is wrong?  I am disgusted and going to bed,,,  I have sewed for 50 Year’s, and it is so smart I will be glad when I fully know how to operate this machine.  Can anyone help Me!


Re: Twin needles

Dottie Newkirk
 


You need a twin needle to make pintucks, what do you do for that?  Claire S.

You use a twin needle and the regular needle plate.  The other was question was for using the twin needle in embroidery mode.  HTH Dottie in Texas


Re: Twin needles

Claire Schutz
 

You need a twin needle to make pintucks, what do you do for that?  Claire S.

On 3/5/2018 11:03 AM, Cheryl Paul wrote:
A few years ago a friend with a 350e was interested in doing shadow work on her machine.  She was extremely frustrated as in embroidery on the machines previous to the 12/15000’s the needle position for embroidery was to the extreme left.  The twin needles available for the Janome machine were centred on the needle shaft so that one was a bit left and the other to the right.  You can see that this wouldn’t work on our machines when in the extreme left position as the left needle would strike the needle plate.  However, Elna had a needle with the very narrow twinning that had the left needle attached to the shaft and another needle welded to the right.  This worked for her BUT she wanted wider and that just wasn’t possible as all us friends looked everywhere to find such a twin needle.  I think eventually she moved on as something else showed up on the current scheme in her sewing world - she is one who like to try new things, then leave it when she’s learned it and go on the the new.

I know that these twin needles might still exist in a sewing store that has been in business a long time.  If enough ask for them, they might also be manufactured again.  I think we’d have more success in getting Janome to use the “Centre” position for the needle not do embroidery - then the twin needles on the market would work for embroidery.  Having said that, there may be a very valid technical reason that the needle is on the left for embroidery to get that precise position for perfect embroidery.

Cheryl - Saskatoon





Re: Twin needles

Cheryl Paul
 

A few years ago a friend with a 350e was interested in doing shadow work on her machine. She was extremely frustrated as in embroidery on the machines previous to the 12/15000’s the needle position for embroidery was to the extreme left. The twin needles available for the Janome machine were centred on the needle shaft so that one was a bit left and the other to the right. You can see that this wouldn’t work on our machines when in the extreme left position as the left needle would strike the needle plate. However, Elna had a needle with the very narrow twinning that had the left needle attached to the shaft and another needle welded to the right. This worked for her BUT she wanted wider and that just wasn’t possible as all us friends looked everywhere to find such a twin needle. I think eventually she moved on as something else showed up on the current scheme in her sewing world - she is one who like to try new things, then leave it when she’s learned it and go on the the new.

I know that these twin needles might still exist in a sewing store that has been in business a long time. If enough ask for them, they might also be manufactured again. I think we’d have more success in getting Janome to use the “Centre” position for the needle not do embroidery - then the twin needles on the market would work for embroidery. Having said that, there may be a very valid technical reason that the needle is on the left for embroidery to get that precise position for perfect embroidery.

Cheryl - Saskatoon


Re: Janome 12000 presser foot

Linda M Robertson <lindamrobertson7@...>
 

I only get that message when i use the walking foot.   It’s very annoying.

Linda


On Mar 4, 2018, at 8:33 PM, J Fraker <frakersfunnyfarm@...> wrote:

Sometimes I get that message too.  Exactly where is that sensor?

On Sun, Mar 4, 2018 at 11:30 AM, Marlys Tipple via Groups.Io <marlys50@...> wrote:
Make sure you don't have dust/lint near the sensor. Every time that happens to me, I check and sure enough a very small bit of lint is there. Restart my machine and message disappears. Sensors are sensitive!


On Sat, Feb 3, 2018 at 9:46 PM, peggy barrett via Groups.Io
<peggy27b=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
i keep getting a msg to change to proper presser foot.  Has anyone else had this problem.  I unplugged it and plugged it in again. No luck.
peggy in Ma



Re: Janome 12000 presser foot

J Fraker
 

Sometimes I get that message too.  Exactly where is that sensor?

On Sun, Mar 4, 2018 at 11:30 AM, Marlys Tipple via Groups.Io <marlys50@...> wrote:
Make sure you don't have dust/lint near the sensor. Every time that happens to me, I check and sure enough a very small bit of lint is there. Restart my machine and message disappears. Sensors are sensitive!


On Sat, Feb 3, 2018 at 9:46 PM, peggy barrett via Groups.Io
<peggy27b=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
i keep getting a msg to change to proper presser foot.  Has anyone else had this problem.  I unplugged it and plugged it in again. No luck.
peggy in Ma



Re: Janome 12000 presser foot

Marlys Tipple
 

Make sure you don't have dust/lint near the sensor. Every time that happens to me, I check and sure enough a very small bit of lint is there. Restart my machine and message disappears. Sensors are sensitive!


On Sat, Feb 3, 2018 at 9:46 PM, peggy barrett via Groups.Io
<peggy27b@...> wrote:
i keep getting a msg to change to proper presser foot.  Has anyone else had this problem.  I unplugged it and plugged it in again. No luck.
peggy in Ma


Re: Twin needles

Anne Parker
 

The Elna EL x 705 ZWI is the right set twin needle - only comes in 2.0/90 as far as I know.  You would of course need to use the zig zag plate on your machine.


I've no idea if it works so up to you if you want to try. Note the right most needle is set lower than the left so I would suggest checking manually with the needle plate off that it doesn't hit the hook or the bobbin case.

One thing I have thought about doing is an embroidery with the single needle as usual, and then deliberately breaking the left most needle of a twin needle in order that I can still use the right needle with the zig zag plate and doing the embroidery again.  Not sure it would do anything different from just moving the design over a bit and embroidering again though.  Possibly some uses for trapunto work?

Just thinking anyway! :0)

Anne
www.sewingtales.wordpress.com

https://www.flickr.com/photos/94302460@N03/sets/

"Great dancers are not great because of their technique, they are great because of their passion"  Martha Graham


Re: Twin needles

Kaye Lessard
 

For Janome machines for sure you. Need to use the twin needle that is offset
The top part of the needle
Also you need to have a needle plate with larger hole
Before starting make sure the 2 needles fit inside hole on needle plate
Kaye in la


Re: Twin needles

Janet
 

Thanks for input.   I think not a good idea to use in embroidery mode.  I did find YouTube videos using double needles in free motion quilting and decorative stitches.  Looks interesting. Have a great day 

Janet


On Mar 2, 2018, at 11:24 PM, onlinesewing@... wrote:

A couple of important points:
Don’t use the single hole needle plate. It will break the needle.
Embroidery is done from the left needle position. If your twin has the shank in the center, between the two needles, it will break the left one. You need an offset twin, where the shank is on the left.


Re: Twin needles

Donna Morton
 

On our 9 mm machines with the zig zag plate on it is possible to do twin needle embroidery but you do need to be careful.   As Janome embroidery machines stitch during embroidery in the left of center position, you must make sure that the double needle does not hit on the left side of the plate.  Try the double needle that came with your machine.
 
If you have a 7 mm machine, then there used to be a special twin needle available but I have not seen it for years.  Without the special twin needle, you cannot to twin needle embroideries.
 
Donna M
Canada
http://www.snipandstitch.com


Re: Twin needles

Jim Stutsman
 

A couple of important points:
Don’t use the single hole needle plate. It will break the needle.
Embroidery is done from the left needle position. If your twin has the shank in the center, between the two needles, it will break the left one. You need an offset twin, where the shank is on the left.


Re: Twin needles

Sue Sweet
 

Hi Janet,
Do you mean doing decorative stitches with a twin needle or an embroidery design in a hoop ? If it's an embroidery design in the hoop you can't use a regular twin needle as the default position of the needle in embroidery is the left needle position and it will get broken. You can get what I think they call a ' left set twin needle' and that should work OK. For decorative stitches with a twin needle check the width of the needle and reduce the width of the stitch and then check the swing of the needle from left to right to make sure it doesn't hit the foot.
Sue

-----Original Message-----
From: Janet via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, March 3, 2018 2:33 PM
To: onlinesewing-janome@groups.io
Subject: [onlinesewing-janome] Twin needles


Has anyone embroidered with twin needles? I bought a pack and understand that it is best to use designs that are not dense or running stitches. Please share your experiences. Thanks
Janet


Twin needles

Janet
 

Has anyone embroidered with twin needles? I bought a pack and understand that it is best to use designs that are not dense or running stitches. Please share your experiences. Thanks
Janet


Re: embroidery on thinish knit t-shirt

Lou Ann
 

I've found that too dense of a design will negatively affect the outcome of your embroidery on t-shirt knits.  Besides washing and drying the shirts first, I found out that I needed to pre wash and dry the cutaway stabilizer I was using.   Someone, somewhere told me that medium to heavy weight cutaway was all they used so I bought a huge bargain-priced roll.  I did a t-shirt with applique that really puckered up badly after I washed and dried the finished shirt.  I had used old t-shirts, i.e. laundered many times, as the fabric for the applique that was backed with a specific iron-on backing just for applique so the fabric didn't curl and shouldn't have shrunk .My second trial had the stabilizer prewashed and dried and that got rid of the puckers.  I've also used the no show mesh with good success...but now I've got this HUGE roll of cutaway...  I'd say the bottom line is less dense designs that are more open for t-shirt knit and do practice pieces until you get the stabilizer/design/fabric/needle combination to your liking.  T-shirts that have been customized are really nice-when they are all done, but getting there can be challenging sometimes!


Re: embroidery on thinish knit t-shirt

Pixey
 

Living in Texas which has more warm months than cold ones, I do a fair bit of embroidering on t-shirts. I find that the design density can be an issue on thinner shirts, no matter how much you stabilize them. I like to use two thicknesses of no show mesh put at 45 degrees to each other. Then I use spray adhesive on the top stabilizer and smooth the t-shirt to that, taking care not to stretch it.

Don’t forget to pre-shrink the shirt by washing and drying it before embroidering. This also fluffs up the fibers and tends to make it easier to embroider. One issue you can run into over time is that the cotton fabric of the shirt will continue to slightly shrink over time when washed and dried repeatedly and this happens at a different rate than the embroidery. When this happens the denser designs end up “cupping”. To avoid it, I use a lot of more open designs or appliqué designs with cotton fabric inserts. If I am using an insert fabric in a lighter color than my t-shirt, I will put a layer of lightweight tear away behind the fabric and remove it when I cut the appliqué.

Hope this helps,
Pixey


Re: circuit board

Jim Stutsman
 

Usually the entire supply is replaced at once. If it failed without burning out a fuse, then it's probable that more than one board could be at fault. It's also rare to have this happen, but not impossible. Exactly one week after the warranty ran out, our Whirlpool microwave failed. In that case a $400 magnetron failed to protect a pair of 50 cent fuses. Lesson learned, Panasonic microwave still going after 10+ years.


circuit board

itsatweetything
 

One of my circuit boards blew, but not the fuse, which I don't understand.
Can I just buy the circuit board, or do I have to buy the entire
power supply?

Maureen


Re: embroidery on thinish knit t-shirt

Bryden Shiells
 

What I found worked really well for me with thin knits was to create a grid – lines say between a quarter and half an inch apart – stitch that first using washaway thread on the top (needle)....  this kept the knit and stabiliser “bonded” and stopped the knit from scooting away from the stabiliser.....
 
I then stitched the design and finally rinsed away the washaway thread.....   the bobbin thread used stitching the grid could just be trimmed away but most just pulled out.
 
I had really good success with this – a friend asked me to sew a design on a T she had bought and it had very narrow stems and flowers....   the whole thing turned out well.
 
Bryden
 
PS   Do make sure to keep the washaway thread sealed and marked clearly, you don’t want to do ordinary sewing with it in error.


Re: using purchased fonts

Mary E
 

Thanks for the help. I ended up putting it together in Horizon Link. It was fairly easy and stitched out nicely! Once I figured out that each letter was a design unto itself, I clicked on design and it went quickly. 
Mary


On Thursday, March 1, 2018, Joyce Daniel <mdaniel@...> wrote:
Mary,
I do this often but it needs to be done thru your embroidery software as each letter is viewed as a design. So, each letter needs to be added individually. A slow- go but you get a custom piece. ( Fonts used must have been digitized for embroider. A font from your computer will not work to embroider on your machine)
I first unzip each letter and dst it in Buzz tools which is what my Embroidery Magic 2 software requires. These are both lower end softwares but I like them and do they do what I need. I'm thinking any software will do this.
I then load each letter individually into EM2 and place it where I want it. Same for next letters. You can also add designs w your letters.
When it's like I want, I save it and Jef it in Buzz Tools so it can be embroidered.
Where did you find the Papyrus font? I embroider the inserts for The Lydia Project and would like to do the Faith, Hope, and Love in this font.
Please LMK if you have more questions.
Joyce in GA
mdaniel@...

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