Date   

sewing mode

sandy k
 

I have been using the 12000 for embroidery for awhile and put it back down in its cabinet to go into sewing mode and all the options are grayed out, I can only use the straight sewing option. I need the quilting patchwork, decorative stitch option to come up. I turned off and on, like the book says.
Thanks


thread-cutter

Vikki Youngmeyer
 

I’m having an intermittent problem with the thread cutter on my 12000. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t. I’ve been using So Fine for both the top and bobbin threads. It’s the top thread that isn’t getting cut. Any suggestions? I’ve had the machine since Thanksgiving last year.

 

Vikki

Houston, TX


Re: Janome Bobbins

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

Over our 25 years as dealers we bought thousands of bobbins, both Janome and (for a very short time) "generic" class 15. The Janome bobbins sometimes had a J on the spindle, sometimes B, sometimes nothing. It has varied over the years. The main difference between the Janome bobbins and the cheap imitations is the thickness of the plastic on the top and bottom of each bobbin. The generic ones are noticeably thinner, and as a consequence break much easier. The imitations also often have little plastic "whiskers" near the hole in the middle, from overused molds that allow small amounts of plastic to leak out around the injection point.

In our final 5 years we bought only the premium Janome bobbins, which contained a small amount of rubber in the plastic. These are part number 102261103. There aren't many visible differences, but they have a different feel to them. The rubber makes them just slightly less slick, so your finger drags ever so slightly when you rub one.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Ann" <annsew65@...> wrote:



Jim,

A question about Janome bobbins. Have the Janome bobbins always had the "J" on the spindle? In checking over my bobbins, I find very few of them with this designation. I purchased a lot of supposedly Janome bobbins from my old Janome dealer in years past , and if this has always been on the bobbins, then this dealer sold me a lot of imitations. Just curious.

I noticed many of them have a letter or number (very small) on the outside edge.


Re: Janome Bobbins

Ann
 

Jim,

A question about Janome bobbins. Have the Janome bobbins always had the "J" on the spindle? In checking over my bobbins, I find very few of them with this designation. I purchased a lot of supposedly Janome bobbins from my old Janome dealer in years past , and if this has always been on the bobbins, then this dealer sold me a lot of imitations. Just curious.

I noticed many of them have a letter or number (very small) on the outside edge.


Re: clunk

Susan <sjspencer@...>
 

Thanks Jim. I noticed the "clunk" too and it didn't bother or concern me but I wondered what it was. Nice to know so that if I ever "don't" hear it, I'll be concerned! Susan

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Jim_Stutsman" <jim@...> wrote:

The "clunk" sound is normal, related to checking the bobbin. If the bobbin sensor were optical you wouldn't have the noise, but then it might not work when the bobbin area got linty.

Serger thread for piecing is not a great idea. It's fuzzy and makes a lot of lint, which will build up in the bobbin case tension area where it can eventually cause loss of tension. Superior makes a lot of different threads. What you want is called Bottom Line. It's a very strong polyester and it's also fine. More importantly, it's made from long fibers so it's smooth with very little lint.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "stresover" <moos@> wrote:

Is there a way I can stop the clunk every time I start sewing after stopping and not raising the presser foot? I assume not but thought I'd ask. The more features you get, the more clunks you get!

Am using serger thread doing some piecing and the stitch isn't very good on the bottom. I bought some Superior Thread a few years ago and it broke as easy as serger thread so have been using serger thread sometimes for piecing. What do you think about serger thread for piecing? It's nice and thin to get an accurate seam allowance.


Re: thread

Susan <sjspencer@...>
 

I've just had my machine a short while and haven't tried a lot of threads. I started with my favorite - Superior So Fine! 50 wt and so far, I haven't had a breaking problem, it's virtually lint free and because it doesn't have the "fuzz", I feel it doesn't take up as much fabric in a seam as cotton of the same weight. I also use this in the bobbin when piecing. I haven't tried free motion quilting on the MC12000 yet, but in my other machine (Juki 2010Q) I've used Superior Omni 40 wt (poly) which is made for longarm machines that sew at high speeds. I'm expecting that it will work well on the MC12000 too and when using Omni, I typically use the So Fine! in the bobbin. Omni is also a low-lint thread. I've done applique on the MC12000 using Superior's mono filament (invisible) thread in the top and the SoFine! in the bobbin - works beautifully! I've also used the Superior Bottom Line in the top for applique and So Fine! in the bobbin and it also worked beautifully. When I started researching threads for quilting and piecing, I too thought I had to use cotton. From what I've read, that is really not the case any more with the high quality polys made for quilters. In fact the So Fine! thread line is John Flynn's and he pieces and quilts with it all the time. Susan

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, Sharon Moos <moos@...> wrote:

I try to use cotton thread for piecing since my fabrics are all cotton. The Superior Thread I purchased at PIQF is Masterpiece and had Alex Anderson's name on it so I thought it would be good. It was expensive. I was surprised it breaks so easily. It says it's extra-long Egyptian cotton. Aurifil seems to work well. A local quilt shop carries Presencia which works well and is expensive for every day piecing.

What thread do you quilters use for piecing?

On Apr 28, 2012, at 6:08 AM, Jim_Stutsman wrote:

The "clunk" sound is normal, related to checking the bobbin. If the bobbin sensor were optical you wouldn't have the noise, but then it might not work when the bobbin area got linty.

Serger thread for piecing is not a great idea. It's fuzzy and makes a lot of lint, which will build up in the bobbin case tension area where it can eventually cause loss of tension. Superior makes a lot of different threads. What you want is called Bottom Line. It's a very strong polyester and it's also fine. More importantly, it's made from long fibers so it's smooth with very little lint.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "stresover" <moos@> wrote:

Is there a way I can stop the clunk every time I start sewing after stopping and not raising the presser foot? I assume not but thought I'd ask. The more features you get, the more clunks you get!

Am using serger thread doing some piecing and the stitch isn't very good on the bottom. I bought some Superior Thread a few years ago and it broke as easy as serger thread so have been using serger thread sometimes for piecing. What do you think about serger thread for piecing? It's nice and thin to get an accurate seam allowance.


Re: clunk

linynp
 

Sharon I use metzler (?spelling) serger thread in the bobbin for embroidery. Cheaper by the cone and works great!!!! Slick thin non linty than other serger threads but a bit thicker than bottom line. Haven't had an issue (knock wood). 12000 likes it too. Haven't tried it other than Bobbin yet though.

Sent from my iPhone
Nancy W


Re: thread

Sherry Martin
 

I tend to use Gutermann Sew-all thread (100% polyester) for piecing because it is readily available at Jo-Ann and if I get it on sale or with coupon not very expensive.

For quilting I like to use a shinier embroidery thread. I've been using Exquisite thread; which is a pretty inexpensive polyester embroidery thread. I never have trouble with it breaking while free-motion quilting. I haven't tried cotton thread for quilting on the 12000, but with other machines I had I always had a lot of trouble with cotton thread breaking during free-motion.

I've been told that you should use only cotton thread for quilting. It has something to do with having the strength of the thread and fabric you use being the same so they wear evenly. I don't know if this is really true, and since I'm not making heirloom quilts I don't worry about it too much. Personally I prefer a thread with more sheen.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, Sharon Moos <moos@...> wrote:

I try to use cotton thread for piecing since my fabrics are all cotton. The Superior Thread I purchased at PIQF is Masterpiece and had Alex Anderson's name on it so I thought it would be good. It was expensive. I was surprised it breaks so easily. It says it's extra-long Egyptian cotton. Aurifil seems to work well. A local quilt shop carries Presencia which works well and is expensive for every day piecing.

What thread do you quilters use for piecing?

On Apr 28, 2012, at 6:08 AM, Jim_Stutsman wrote:

The "clunk" sound is normal, related to checking the bobbin. If the bobbin sensor were optical you wouldn't have the noise, but then it might not work when the bobbin area got linty.

Serger thread for piecing is not a great idea. It's fuzzy and makes a lot of lint, which will build up in the bobbin case tension area where it can eventually cause loss of tension. Superior makes a lot of different threads. What you want is called Bottom Line. It's a very strong polyester and it's also fine. More importantly, it's made from long fibers so it's smooth with very little lint.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "stresover" <moos@> wrote:

Is there a way I can stop the clunk every time I start sewing after stopping and not raising the presser foot? I assume not but thought I'd ask. The more features you get, the more clunks you get!

Am using serger thread doing some piecing and the stitch isn't very good on the bottom. I bought some Superior Thread a few years ago and it broke as easy as serger thread so have been using serger thread sometimes for piecing. What do you think about serger thread for piecing? It's nice and thin to get an accurate seam allowance.


Re: thread

Laura Catto (Brayford)
 

I use Prescencia, Aurifil or Mettler Silk Finish...all meet my needs and work on my low end as well as my high end machines...
 
Laua

From: Sharon Moos
To: janome12000@...
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2012 8:16:37 AM
Subject: [janome12000] Re: thread

 
I try to use cotton thread for piecing since my fabrics are all cotton. The Superior Thread I purchased at PIQF is Masterpiece and had Alex Anderson's name on it so I thought it would be good. It was expensive. I was surprised it breaks so easily. It says it's extra-long Egyptian cotton.  Aurifil seems to work well. A local quilt shop carries Presencia which works well and is expensive for every day piecing. 

What thread do you quilters use for piecing? 

On Apr 28, 2012, at 6:08 AM, Jim_Stutsman wrote:

 
The "clunk" sound is normal, related to checking the bobbin. If the bobbin sensor were optical you wouldn't have the noise, but then it might not work when the bobbin area got linty.

Serger thread for piecing is not a great idea. It's fuzzy and makes a lot of lint, which will build up in the bobbin case tension area where it can eventually cause loss of tension. Superior makes a lot of different threads. What you want is called Bottom Line. It's a very strong polyester and it's also fine. More importantly, it's made from long fibers so it's smooth with very little lint.

--- In janome12000@..., "stresover" wrote:
>
> Is there a way I can stop the clunk every time I start sewing after stopping and not raising the presser foot? I assume not but thought I'd ask. The more features you get, the more clunks you get!
>
> Am using serger thread doing some piecing and the stitch isn't very good on the bottom. I bought some Superior Thread a few years ago and it broke as easy as serger thread so have been using serger thread sometimes for piecing. What do you think about serger thread for piecing? It's nice and thin to get an accurate seam allowance.
>







Re: thread

Sharon Moos <moos@...>
 

I try to use cotton thread for piecing since my fabrics are all cotton. The Superior Thread I purchased at PIQF is Masterpiece and had Alex Anderson's name on it so I thought it would be good. It was expensive. I was surprised it breaks so easily. It says it's extra-long Egyptian cotton.  Aurifil seems to work well. A local quilt shop carries Presencia which works well and is expensive for every day piecing. 

What thread do you quilters use for piecing? 

On Apr 28, 2012, at 6:08 AM, Jim_Stutsman wrote:

 

The "clunk" sound is normal, related to checking the bobbin. If the bobbin sensor were optical you wouldn't have the noise, but then it might not work when the bobbin area got linty.

Serger thread for piecing is not a great idea. It's fuzzy and makes a lot of lint, which will build up in the bobbin case tension area where it can eventually cause loss of tension. Superior makes a lot of different threads. What you want is called Bottom Line. It's a very strong polyester and it's also fine. More importantly, it's made from long fibers so it's smooth with very little lint.

--- In janome12000@..., "stresover" wrote:
>
> Is there a way I can stop the clunk every time I start sewing after stopping and not raising the presser foot? I assume not but thought I'd ask. The more features you get, the more clunks you get!
>
> Am using serger thread doing some piecing and the stitch isn't very good on the bottom. I bought some Superior Thread a few years ago and it broke as easy as serger thread so have been using serger thread sometimes for piecing. What do you think about serger thread for piecing? It's nice and thin to get an accurate seam allowance.
>



Re: MBX Cross Stitch add on question

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

Once you are inside the Cross Stitch option (File -> Cross Stitch) click the "Help -> Online Manual" menu option and it will open the manual in Adobe Reader, or whatever PDF reader you have installed. From there you can print it out. If you want the actual PDF file for printing at Kinko's or an office supply store, you can get it from this folder:
C: -> Program Files -> Janome -> Digitizer MBX -> BIN -> XDSGNED.PDF

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, GLENDA T <t_glenda@...> wrote:

Does any one have the cross stitch add on installed with the MBX program?  I am trying to figure out how to download the manual for it so I can print it out.  Cannot see a file that is the manual on the CD that came with it.  Thank you for any help.
Glenda
 


Re: clunk

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

The "clunk" sound is normal, related to checking the bobbin. If the bobbin sensor were optical you wouldn't have the noise, but then it might not work when the bobbin area got linty.

Serger thread for piecing is not a great idea. It's fuzzy and makes a lot of lint, which will build up in the bobbin case tension area where it can eventually cause loss of tension. Superior makes a lot of different threads. What you want is called Bottom Line. It's a very strong polyester and it's also fine. More importantly, it's made from long fibers so it's smooth with very little lint.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "stresover" <moos@...> wrote:

Is there a way I can stop the clunk every time I start sewing after stopping and not raising the presser foot? I assume not but thought I'd ask. The more features you get, the more clunks you get!

Am using serger thread doing some piecing and the stitch isn't very good on the bottom. I bought some Superior Thread a few years ago and it broke as easy as serger thread so have been using serger thread sometimes for piecing. What do you think about serger thread for piecing? It's nice and thin to get an accurate seam allowance.


MBX Cross Stitch add on question

GLENDA T
 

Does any one have the cross stitch add on installed with the MBX program?  I am trying to figure out how to download the manual for it so I can print it out.  Cannot see a file that is the manual on the CD that came with it.  Thank you for any help.
Glenda
 


clunk

stresover <moos@...>
 

Is there a way I can stop the clunk every time I start sewing after stopping and not raising the presser foot? I assume not but thought I'd ask. The more features you get, the more clunks you get!

Am using serger thread doing some piecing and the stitch isn't very good on the bottom. I bought some Superior Thread a few years ago and it broke as easy as serger thread so have been using serger thread sometimes for piecing. What do you think about serger thread for piecing? It's nice and thin to get an accurate seam allowance.


Re: MBX Problems!!!!! OOps

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

Ah, that's even better. There's nothing you can do in HorizonLink to mess up your computer. I'll be the first to admit that it's not the most user friendly program Janome's ever done, and you might find it to be user hostile to some extent. But it's also quite benign with regard to your computer, so there's not harm whatever in just firing it up and playing. You'll learn much doing this, and we're here to help if you get bogged down. Enjoy!

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "HDD" <hddcreation@...> wrote:


OOPS!
I was thinking of and referring to HORIZON LINK!
Same worries though re same reasons!
Cheers
Heather


Re: MBX Problems!!!!! OOps

mcmaster_heather
 

OOPS!
I was thinking of and referring to HORIZON LINK!
Same worries though re same reasons!
Cheers
Heather

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Jim_Stutsman" <jim@...> wrote:

In my experience those who think they are computer experts have the most problems. That's because they charge ahead without reading instructions, and then when problems occur they immediately react without thinking, making the problems even worse. Yes, you can get over this. Start by getting yourself a safety net. Make a complete *image* backup of your computer to an external disk drive. This is something everyone should do anyway, so it's not wasted effort. One of my favorite programs for image backups is this one:
http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage/
This way, even if things go horribly wrong, you can put your computer back like it was.

After you've made your backup, insert the MBX DVD in your computer and begin the installation. Read each and every screen before clicking the NEXT button, and be sure to check all the options except those involving languages you won't need. When you've done that you should be ready to go. Use the included DVD by Trevor Conquergood and explore the program. Take deep breaths and ENJOY learning something new. Learn the tools and use the program, and soon you'll have all your family and friends pestering you to embroider things for them.

Remember the old saying - Buy a woman a vacuum cleaner and she'll kick you where the sun don't shine. Buy her an embroidery machine and you won't see her for days at a time! That may not be quite how it goes, as I'm paraphrasing from memory. In any case, please keep us informed on your progress, and we in turn shall cheer your efforts!

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "HDD" <hddcreation@> wrote:

Hi I just wanted to put a post in on this thread. I have had my 1200 since Dec. Done little or no embroidery YET. And HAVEN"T installed the MBX program.
Why you ask - because I am not overly computer confident and I have been put off by all the issues I read about on the forum.
Can I get over this Jim???
Personnally I am not sure!

Heather
QLD Australia


Re: skipping colour in horizon link

maggie cooper
 

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Jim_Stutsman" <jim@...> wrote:

They speak English in Scotland???? You could have fooled me! Before we closed the shop we had a couple from Scotland as customers. Diane and I would both listen to them, then compare notes to see if we could decipher what was said! As the might have said, our understanding gang aft aglay. (Apologies to Robert Burns!)
ROFL, all Scottish schools teach the Queens English, which is NOT the version coomonly known as Standard English. The closest example I can think of right now is the German, High German and Low German. The Scots still pronounce the H as in what, where, when, why, the English don't. But I will agree if you get a couple of Scots talking quickly in their local dialect, forget trying to understand it. Its usually a mix of gallic, English, colloquiel words and depending on their homeplace can be sharp and hard or soft and lilting. Then again I used to find it hard to tune into some Americans, and would get confused by things like sidewalk for pavement, creek for stream, yard for garden, its true we are divided by our shared language.
Maggie C


Re: MBX Problems!!!!!

maggie cooper
 

Besides jims suggestions you might try downloading the latest Hasp (dongle) driver from Alladin (now safenet but still google alladin hasp driver) for some unknown reason Windows 7 can stop communicating with it. Check you have the latest drivers for your display card, even though your computer is fairly new, doesn't mean it shipped with all the latest drivers.
The message had a problem sending design to program isnt the problem it appears, just wait and the program will open with the design in the hoop, another Windows quirk, it wants the program to instantly react. It is a big program so takes time to open as it isnt just MBX opening but Corel as well, Win 7 doesnt allow for that so shoots up ''problem sending command to program.'' it's more impatient than we are.
Maggie Cooper

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "sbspicer" <sbspicer@...> wrote:

Hi Jim
thanks for reply, not wanted I really wanted to hear:-(
my PC is only 2 months old as is an All in one touch screen desktop operating on Windows 7, PC is not freezing up, just MBX everything else working Ok,I have had a couple of error messages one says There was a problem sending command to the program
the other system error, exception access violation
excepton code:c000005
exception flags:0
exception address:0064245B
number paramaters:
statup addres:006219F0
offset of exception:00020A6B, to me complete gobeledy gook maybe they mean something to you or a learned friend out there.
Kind Regards
Sandra

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Jim_Stutsman" <jim@> wrote:

Aaack!!! Your dealer did you no favors! The usual uninstall/reinstall shuffle should not be used with MBX. It will prevent the Corel option from reinstalling correctly. You may need help from Janome to get it reinstalled, as there are some internal Windows settings that need to be adjusted.

The sudden freezing up could be from many different things. If you've had your computer for a while (3 years or more) it could be overheating. This comes from accumulated dust and dirt that gets sucked into the computer, and sometimes the cooling fan itself stops working. You may not notice at all until you use a program that requires a lot of CPU power, which Digitizer MBX definitely does. The computer chip inside the computer monitors the temperature, and if it gets too high it will stop working to prevent itself from being damaged.

If your computer is a desktop, you can probably remove one of the covers. Unplug everything, take off one or both covers and vacuum out all the dust. Compressed air can be used to blow dust out of crevices, like the fins of the heat sink that the cooling fan rests on. Once everything is clean you can put it back together, but before you put on the final cover plug it in and turn it on just long enough to verify that the fans are all working. If any are not working, replace them.

Laptops are tougher, because they are full of tiny parts and just taking one apart is a big challenge. If the computer is a laptop, have it checked by a professional. Cooling fans often fail in laptops, and need to be replaced.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "sbspicer" <sbspicer@> wrote:

Hi there
I sure hope some one can help me, I was using MBX this morning (UK) when suddenly it stared freezing up for no apparent reason, I switched PC off/on several times and neither time would the programme open again.
I called my dealer who said to uninstall and then re install programme,
I have been trying this and settings etc for around 8 hours now and ready for pulling my hair out,any help would be very gratefully received.
TIA everyone.
Kind Regards
Sandra


Re: Foot question

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

What you have is the Brush Out Embroidery Kit. Originally it was sold as just the foot, just a CD of designs, or a complete kit of both foot and designs. That was 7 years ago, and Janome has been dragging it back out as a promotional freebie over and over since then. It's kind of a fun novelty, but we had trouble finding suitable baby yarn to use with it, and you can only make so many fuzzy designs. However if you have Digitizer (MBX or prior) you may enjoy designing your own fuzzy designs. This document at Janome will explain how:
http://www.janome.co.jp/e/e_downloads/pdf/janomebulletin/ibe_digitizer.pdf

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "judyjanome" <judyjanome@...> wrote:

I am receiving my pack of the month this week, and the dealer opened it at my request to find some type of embroidery foot with a special tool to cut or make fuzzies after you do your embroidery. Does anyone know of the foot mentioned? It said it was for all MC embroidery machines. Judujanome.


Re: MBX Problems!!!!!

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

In my experience those who think they are computer experts have the most problems. That's because they charge ahead without reading instructions, and then when problems occur they immediately react without thinking, making the problems even worse. Yes, you can get over this. Start by getting yourself a safety net. Make a complete *image* backup of your computer to an external disk drive. This is something everyone should do anyway, so it's not wasted effort. One of my favorite programs for image backups is this one:
http://www.acronis.com/homecomputing/products/trueimage/
This way, even if things go horribly wrong, you can put your computer back like it was.

After you've made your backup, insert the MBX DVD in your computer and begin the installation. Read each and every screen before clicking the NEXT button, and be sure to check all the options except those involving languages you won't need. When you've done that you should be ready to go. Use the included DVD by Trevor Conquergood and explore the program. Take deep breaths and ENJOY learning something new. Learn the tools and use the program, and soon you'll have all your family and friends pestering you to embroider things for them.

Remember the old saying - Buy a woman a vacuum cleaner and she'll kick you where the sun don't shine. Buy her an embroidery machine and you won't see her for days at a time! That may not be quite how it goes, as I'm paraphrasing from memory. In any case, please keep us informed on your progress, and we in turn shall cheer your efforts!

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "HDD" <hddcreation@...> wrote:

Hi I just wanted to put a post in on this thread. I have had my 1200 since Dec. Done little or no embroidery YET. And HAVEN"T installed the MBX program.
Why you ask - because I am not overly computer confident and I have been put off by all the issues I read about on the forum.
Can I get over this Jim???
Personnally I am not sure!

Heather
QLD Australia