Date   

Re: Lighter weight machines

suewatts12 <suewatts12@...>
 

My dealer only offered me $900 for my 11000 special edition on a trade in to a 15000. I was disappointed so I kept it. It was worth more than that to me.



Sent from my U.S. Cellular® Smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "susies.stitches@... [janome12000]" <janome12000@...>
Date: 5/20/17 5:51 PM (GMT-06:00)
To: janome12000@...
Subject: [janome12000] Re: Lighter weight machines

 

Hi Cheryl,

Thanks for your input!  I have been considering the Skyline S9.  It just depends on how heavy it is, and if my 12000 is worth enough to trade for it.  I can't lift the 15000 at all.  Most shops will get the machines in and out of the car, but I have to be able to load and unload it on my end.  I can use the trolley for the 12000 to make it easier. I'll be happy to get a used one; I trust my dealer completely to take care of any problems.  I'll go check the prices again - I have all kinds of numbers swimming around in my head🙃  I'll keep you posted.  Sue


Re: Decorative Stitches

Linda <lindamrobertson7@...>
 

I'm going to use ins to sew the binding down on a quilt.

Linda from Texas 

Sent from my iPhone

On May 22, 2017, at 5:04 AM, 'MarieD' vze2c6r5@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

I make a lot of knit shirts, like tees. I hem them with decorative
stitches, rather than just a straight or zig-zag stitch. I try to find a
stitch that will have some stretch to it.

It can be tricky to hem from the right side, but it's no different than
using my coverstitch to hem.

Marie

-----Original Message-----
From: J Fraker frakersfunnyfarm@... [janome12000]
Sent: Sunday, May 21, 2017 8:05 PM
To: janome12000@...
Subject: [janome12000] Decorative Stitches

I'd be interested in knowing the different ways everyone uses their
decorative stitches.


Re: Yahoo Privacy Policy Changes?

Cat - N
 

Hi, Marie!

As one who paid for netscape.net email back in the 1990's when nothing on the computer services horizon, including the infant internet, when AOL acquired Netscape, AOL kept the email addresses.  Lest you think AOL is a 'newer' company, I would point out that when I had CompuServe starting back in the early to low-mid 1980's, AOL was a "competitor" but under a different name...it later became America OnLine or more commonly known as AOL.  My off-hand 'guess' would be that, if you keep your verizon.net address, AOL will build "aliases" for them so that they do still work.  The only real issues I have had were (I think) due to AOL service/software 'updates' that caused the "auto-reply address" to 'become' navillusc@... rather than navillusc@... (and AOL has also built an alias email address of navillusc@...), which caused posts to groups to be rejected.  I NEVER use those ALIAS email addresses, but for that time period, I had to watch the "FROM" field...there is a little 'arrow' to "drop down" the list beside the address shown and change it, so I had to manually change MY email address back to what it should have been.  I contacted AOL about the issue and they 'said' THEY didn't have a problem...LOL..but, magically, afterward, MY email address QUIT auto-magically changing...as if accomplished by the AOL magic wand...LOL

- Cat (FL)



-----Original Message-----
Sent: Mon, May 22, 2017 7:34 am

 
Verizon shut down its email service and told us users to look elsewhere.

Or, if we wanted to keep our verizon.net address, they'd switch our accounts
to AOL. I am not happy, but dread having to change my email address in
dozens or hundreds of places. So, Verizon is acting strangely and who knows
what they're going to do next.

Marie

-----Original Message-----

Sent: Sunday, May 21, 2017 11:38 AM

I doubt very much that Verizon will try to use it as a competitor to
Facebook, and it's possible they could just shut it down. I really don't see
why they bought Yahoo in the first place, but I'm just an old geek so what
do I know!


Re: Decorative Stitches

Fran
 

If anyone is interested in purchasing a 15000, mine is 1 year old and I would like to sell it with all accessories.


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Monday, May 22, 2017, 7:36 AM, Patricia Ward ward.pm@... [janome12000] wrote:

 

Some of my uses for decorative stitches:

a vertical row between widely spaced pin tucks on a blouse or child's dress  

across the yoke of a child's dress instead of smocking

to decorate the front of pillow covers on throw pillows.  I change mine with the seasons to change look in the family room so I have done that with plain fabric pillow covers.  Make them envelope style on the serger. 

down the center of a narrow strip of plain fabric on a wall quilt inner border 

make rows of them on front fabric then back it with plain fabric to make a bookmarker 

And last I have to tell you what my late mother did after I gave her my first Singer Touch and Sew with the cams for decorative stitches all the way back in the 70s....  she made a pot holder but on the front of the fabric she sewed 1 inch strips of gross grain ribbon in a wide diamond design and then sewed down the ribbon with decorative stitches.  Then she continued to make the pot holder using two old washclothes to "stuff" it against heat.  She had never heard of batting but wanted some thickness in it for protection.  

With that Singer she thought she was, as my father would say, " the cat's whiskers"...    I wonder what she would think of our 15000 machines.  
Pardon the old lady reminiscing... but your uses for decorative stitches made me think of that.........

Just use your imagination when you look at something you make or want to embellish and think of it as a blank canvas.  

Pat in MD

On Sun, May 21, 2017 at 8:05 PM, J Fraker frakersfunnyfarm@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:


I'd be interested in knowing the different ways everyone uses their decorative stitches.  One thing I do is sew several rows of different stitches on the band of towels, pillowcases, sheets, etc.  I'd love to have some more creative ideas, though.  There are so many pretty stitches, I'd like to use them for something.




Re: Decorative Stitches

Jill Kenyon <jpkenyon@...>
 

I use decorative stitches on quilt bindings and on clothes for my granddaughter as well as baby clothes.   My Mom used decorative stitches on tablecloths, towels and curtains.
--
 Write your sorrows in sand . . . .  your blessings in stone.


Re: Decorative Stitches

Patricia Ward
 

Some of my uses for decorative stitches:

a vertical row between widely spaced pin tucks on a blouse or child's dress  

across the yoke of a child's dress instead of smocking

to decorate the front of pillow covers on throw pillows.  I change mine with the seasons to change look in the family room so I have done that with plain fabric pillow covers.  Make them envelope style on the serger. 

down the center of a narrow strip of plain fabric on a wall quilt inner border 

make rows of them on front fabric then back it with plain fabric to make a bookmarker 

And last I have to tell you what my late mother did after I gave her my first Singer Touch and Sew with the cams for decorative stitches all the way back in the 70s....  she made a pot holder but on the front of the fabric she sewed 1 inch strips of gross grain ribbon in a wide diamond design and then sewed down the ribbon with decorative stitches.  Then she continued to make the pot holder using two old washclothes to "stuff" it against heat.  She had never heard of batting but wanted some thickness in it for protection.  

With that Singer she thought she was, as my father would say, " the cat's whiskers"...    I wonder what she would think of our 15000 machines.  
Pardon the old lady reminiscing... but your uses for decorative stitches made me think of that.........

Just use your imagination when you look at something you make or want to embellish and think of it as a blank canvas.  

Pat in MD

On Sun, May 21, 2017 at 8:05 PM, J Fraker frakersfunnyfarm@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:


I'd be interested in knowing the different ways everyone uses their decorative stitches.  One thing I do is sew several rows of different stitches on the band of towels, pillowcases, sheets, etc.  I'd love to have some more creative ideas, though.  There are so many pretty stitches, I'd like to use them for something.




Re: Needle Threader

Meryl Margolies
 

I've been in lala land apparently.


What threader on Amazon are we talking about. I think I need one.


Thanks.


Re: Decorative Stitches

MarieD
 

I make a lot of knit shirts, like tees. I hem them with decorative
stitches, rather than just a straight or zig-zag stitch. I try to find a
stitch that will have some stretch to it.


It can be tricky to hem from the right side, but it's no different than
using my coverstitch to hem.


Marie

-----Original Message-----
From: J Fraker frakersfunnyfarm@yahoo.com [janome12000]
Sent: Sunday, May 21, 2017 8:05 PM
To: janome12000@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [janome12000] Decorative Stitches








I'd be interested in knowing the different ways everyone uses their
decorative stitches.


Re: Yahoo Privacy Policy Changes?

MarieD
 

Verizon shut down its email service and told us users to look elsewhere.


Or, if we wanted to keep our verizon.net address, they'd switch our accounts
to AOL. I am not happy, but dread having to change my email address in
dozens or hundreds of places. So, Verizon is acting strangely and who knows
what they're going to do next.


Marie

-----Original Message-----


Sent: Sunday, May 21, 2017 11:38 AM


I doubt very much that Verizon will try to use it as a competitor to
Facebook, and it's possible they could just shut it down. I really don't see
why they bought Yahoo in the first place, but I'm just an old geek so what
do I know!


Sending Janome 15000 to Janome

Bernie Giannotti
 

Jim,


I have a question, please uncover your "Crystal Ball" for me this evening.


My dealer wants to send my machine to Janome 15000  to be repaired. What is the approximate cost for shipping and repair of my "Needle Threader" when sent back to Janome.


Do I pay for everything after the year warranty is over or not.  


Thank you very much.


Bernie / SC.


I have no idea what the charges will be. Your dealer will be billed for the service and will charge you as he/she sees fit. Shipping will be somewhat pricey due to the size and weight of the machine. The one year warranty is for labor, so if it's past a year there will be charge for labor. Electrical components are covered for 5 years, so you would not have to pay for any electrical parts.


Decorative Stitches

J Fraker
 

I'd be interested in knowing the different ways everyone uses their decorative stitches.  One thing I do is sew several rows of different stitches on the band of towels, pillowcases, sheets, etc.  I'd love to have some more creative ideas, though.  There are so many pretty stitches, I'd like to use them for something.


Re: Needle Threader

Claire Schutz
 

The threader I have came from a serger, I place toward top of needle and slowly slide down, and yes, gently push the thread thru, works every time, Claire S.

On 5/20/2017 7:21 PM, Connie Strittmatter sewpicky1@... [janome12000] wrote:
 

Jim,

You are serious about this little manual needle threader?    I will place Amazon order yet today. The threader on my 15000 did not work initially at the dealer on day of purchase.  It was almost a deal breaker for me deciding to purchase the machine.  Several trips back  for adjustments and he finally offered to replace the threader.  Unfortunately this did not result in a threader that consistently works for more than just a few times. Even different brands of similar weight embroidery thread can make the threader cranky !  


It's a good threader. Just GENTLY press against the needle with the thread in the threader. When it finds the eye it will go in and you just push to get the thread in. Use the hook end to grab the thread end and you're done!


Re: Needle Threader

Claire Schutz
 

I have Pfaff 2140/70 with a built-in manual threader.  Pull it down and it will swing to thread the needle, seldom but almost never does it miss.  Of course, one must be careful not to bend the metal that pushes thread thru the eye.  Have had mine for 17yrs and never had it fixed.  This would be great on the Janome but sure there would be complaints that not automatic enough.  Oh well, the handheld one you suggested is also very good,  Claire S.

On 5/20/2017 10:47 AM, jim.stutsman@... [janome12000] wrote:
 

After 25 years of repairing Janome machines, I have to agree that the needle threader is the single most common problem. In just about every class we ever had, I spent the first 15-20 minutes repairing threaders before class. There is a back story there, which I reluctantly tell at the risk of encountering a blamestorm.


The mechanics of a needle threader are fairly simple. Something has to go through the eye of the needle, either to push thread through, or hook it and pull it through. When we first entered the business, the threader on most top of line models used a tiny blade on a push button to shove the thread through the eye. This was a decent idea, except when the blade was not perfectly lined up with the eye. One quick push and the necessarily thin blade would fold over, never to work again.

Because I had more experience with computers than most (or really any) other dealers, I was asked to provide input on the Memory Craft 10000. I stressed to the Janome engineers how much of a problem the threader was, and that it needed a redesign. Their response was the motorized threader activated by a touch on the front panel. It was a good design, BUT if everything was not perfectly aligned the hook would not line up with the eye and it would be deflected left or right, never to work again. The first models of the 10000 also had some problems with sketchy motors, resulting in a sticker on the door showing how to get the threader back up so you could sew.

Since the 10000 they have stuck with the motorized, hook-through-the-back method of threading. For it to work a lot of things have to happen:
- The machine needs to stop with the needle up at exactly the same place every time.
- The needle needs to be positioned all the way up in the needle clamp.
- The needle must be absolutely straight.
- The eye of the needle needs to be larger than the hook, which can be questionable for size 10 and lower.
- The operator needs to perform all the steps correctly. Pull the thread too much and it can misalign the hook.
If even one thing is slightly off, the hook will not go through the eye. It can bend over, or deflect left or right. Once that happens you're doomed to a service visit. On the technician side it's a maddening repair. Once the hook has been replace everything needs to be realigned again, a tedious process that usually results in "cowboy words". Most repairs are done using a new needle, size 14. If the threader is calibrated to work with a 14 it may not work with an 11 or smaller, because the hook is either slightly above or below the dead center of the eye on a 14. Add to this a large number of machines needing repair and a technician who is light on patience, and you have a recipe for a needle threader that works for a short while and then fails again.

Ironically the most reliable threader is not built into the machine at all. It only requires the operator to hold it GENTLY against the needle until the built-in blade finds the eye, then push to poke the thread through. If (when) the blade gets bent it's inexpensive to replace. Sometimes old school is better!


Re: Needle Threader

Carole Hollmann
 

Complaining directly to Janome is an excellent point. I have several complaints to make, most of which have been mentioned here.  Perhaps you (or Jim) could tell us how we go about contacting someone who would actually care. 

Carole 

Sent from my iPhone

This page has the links for contacting Janome. Your best option is probably the Janome Support choice, but keep in mind you are communicating with the American part of Janome and decisions regarding hardware are made in Japan. It looks like a new top of line machine may be coming this fall. Even if it has a vastly improved needle threader, that will not be of help to existing machine owners. Hardware retrofits are very rare.


Re: Needle Threader

Roberta K
 

Pixey,

I could not agree with you more about the MC3000. However I also own an MC11000 and MC6600 and the threaders on them work really well.

Jim's idea of keeping a manual threader around is also right-on. I use one for my server all the time.

Roberta in FL


Yahoo Privacy Policy Changes?

blue_lak <no_reply@...>
 

A question for Jim...we all probably got the same email about Privacy Policy Changes due to Verizon buying Yahoo, but do you have any thoughts on potential impacts on Yahoo Groups? Other thoughts on those changes?
Jan in MD

It could go a couple of different ways. I don't think that Yahoo has made much advertising money from Yahoo Groups, and they haven't devoted much effort to improving it. Compared to Facebook, it's the Sahara desert. I doubt very much that Verizon will try to use it as a competitor to Facebook, and it's possible they could just shut it down. I really don't see why they bought Yahoo in the first place, but I'm just an old geek so what do I know!


Re: Needle Threader

Joyce VanAtta
 

I recently purchased the Janome blue tip needles
and had the same problem with my 11000. Took it
out and put it back in to be sure it was in the right place,
and the threader still would not catch the thread.  I have
no problem with the Schmetz or Organ needles.

I wonder if something has changed with the needle production.
In the past I have had no troubles with the Janome needles.

Joyce


Re: Needle Threader

J Fraker
 

I have the 12000 and the manual needle threader works great.  Seems if there is going to be such a big problem, it would be best just to go back to that type.



From: "Anne Parker lokicat6@... [janome12000]"
To: janome12000@...
Sent: Saturday, May 20, 2017 4:29 PM
Subject: [janome12000] Re: Needle Threader

 
I love the threader on the 15000 - but it is temperamental.

I sometimes think a more manual threader would be easier to operate on a daily basis.  At least you can actually see what is happening.  The only way you can see what is happening on the 15000 is if you video it with your camera/phone and play it back in slow time.

I also think that the adjustment is critical - you may just have a machine where the adjustment isn't right - maybe the needle stop is a miniscule bit out and the threader is a miniscle bit out.  I count myself lucky that I have a machine that works most of the time.  In fact one of the only two issues I have are when I try too thick a thread with too thin a needle.  There are specifications in the manual on the thickness of thread and size of needle it will work with.  I also don't use it with metallic thread. (same as I don't use the cutter with metallic thread). 

The second issue is when I change needle - which of course leads me to maybe use a needle for longer than I should.  It is quite specific on where the needle needs to be placed in the needle clamp.  There is room for manoever, at least in my needle clamp.  The needle can be secured at a slight angle to the horizontal which will mean that the threader hook just glances off the side of the needle or at worse gets temporarily caught at an angle in the needle.  So far that hasn't bent the needle threader hook (fingers crossed).

What I now do is use the opposite end of a manual threader that allows you to hold the needle and push it hard up into the clamp whilst at the same time turning it as far to the left as possible - you may not even be able to see that you are turning it but just push it hard.  Then tighten the clamp.

This may take a few goes until the needle threads on testing.  Once I get the machine to thread a needle once I don't have an issue again until I change to another needle.  I find it easier to use topstitch needles which have a bigger eye so allow a bit more leeway for threading, but I changed to an embroidery needle last week and it only took me 2 goes to get it to thread.  I don't really use univesal needles in it anymore because that has a smaller eye than topstitch or embroidery needles.

Anne
www.sewingtales.wordpress.com

https://www.flickr.com/photos/94302460@N03/sets/

"If you want to be happy - give up living your life to other peoples expectations"



Acu apps

Marilyn Fleming
 

I wish there were paper directions for the Acu apps, especially AcuDesign, maybe there is and I don't know it. 

Am I the only one that needs them?


Re: Needle Threader

Deb Keldrauk
 

Thank you Jim - This is why I love this group. You are so honest. I am the one who started this tread "this time" I know it will have more go rounds. If you really look at the needle threader mechanics it's kind of surprising that has worked so well for so long. I have a choice here, I can hate on Janome and feel disappointed in my otherwise pretty fantastic machine or I can just learn to automatically do the task of threading in another way. So from pushing the lock button and pulling the thread to the side (then having to remember to tap the unlock b4 I try to sew) to reaching into my drawer and taking out yet another do-hickey to get the job done. I just ordered a pack of 3 from Amazon bless you.
Deb in CA

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