Date   

Re: Needle Threader

Roberta K
 

Pixey,

I could not agree with you more about the MC3000. However I also own an MC11000 and MC6600 and the threaders on them work really well.

Jim's idea of keeping a manual threader around is also right-on. I use one for my server all the time.

Roberta in FL


Yahoo Privacy Policy Changes?

blue_lak <no_reply@...>
 

A question for Jim...we all probably got the same email about Privacy Policy Changes due to Verizon buying Yahoo, but do you have any thoughts on potential impacts on Yahoo Groups? Other thoughts on those changes?
Jan in MD

It could go a couple of different ways. I don't think that Yahoo has made much advertising money from Yahoo Groups, and they haven't devoted much effort to improving it. Compared to Facebook, it's the Sahara desert. I doubt very much that Verizon will try to use it as a competitor to Facebook, and it's possible they could just shut it down. I really don't see why they bought Yahoo in the first place, but I'm just an old geek so what do I know!


Re: Needle Threader

Joyce VanAtta
 

I recently purchased the Janome blue tip needles
and had the same problem with my 11000. Took it
out and put it back in to be sure it was in the right place,
and the threader still would not catch the thread.  I have
no problem with the Schmetz or Organ needles.

I wonder if something has changed with the needle production.
In the past I have had no troubles with the Janome needles.

Joyce


Re: Needle Threader

J Fraker
 

I have the 12000 and the manual needle threader works great.  Seems if there is going to be such a big problem, it would be best just to go back to that type.



From: "Anne Parker lokicat6@... [janome12000]"
To: janome12000@...
Sent: Saturday, May 20, 2017 4:29 PM
Subject: [janome12000] Re: Needle Threader

 
I love the threader on the 15000 - but it is temperamental.

I sometimes think a more manual threader would be easier to operate on a daily basis.  At least you can actually see what is happening.  The only way you can see what is happening on the 15000 is if you video it with your camera/phone and play it back in slow time.

I also think that the adjustment is critical - you may just have a machine where the adjustment isn't right - maybe the needle stop is a miniscule bit out and the threader is a miniscle bit out.  I count myself lucky that I have a machine that works most of the time.  In fact one of the only two issues I have are when I try too thick a thread with too thin a needle.  There are specifications in the manual on the thickness of thread and size of needle it will work with.  I also don't use it with metallic thread. (same as I don't use the cutter with metallic thread). 

The second issue is when I change needle - which of course leads me to maybe use a needle for longer than I should.  It is quite specific on where the needle needs to be placed in the needle clamp.  There is room for manoever, at least in my needle clamp.  The needle can be secured at a slight angle to the horizontal which will mean that the threader hook just glances off the side of the needle or at worse gets temporarily caught at an angle in the needle.  So far that hasn't bent the needle threader hook (fingers crossed).

What I now do is use the opposite end of a manual threader that allows you to hold the needle and push it hard up into the clamp whilst at the same time turning it as far to the left as possible - you may not even be able to see that you are turning it but just push it hard.  Then tighten the clamp.

This may take a few goes until the needle threads on testing.  Once I get the machine to thread a needle once I don't have an issue again until I change to another needle.  I find it easier to use topstitch needles which have a bigger eye so allow a bit more leeway for threading, but I changed to an embroidery needle last week and it only took me 2 goes to get it to thread.  I don't really use univesal needles in it anymore because that has a smaller eye than topstitch or embroidery needles.

Anne
www.sewingtales.wordpress.com

https://www.flickr.com/photos/94302460@N03/sets/

"If you want to be happy - give up living your life to other peoples expectations"



Acu apps

Marilyn Fleming
 

I wish there were paper directions for the Acu apps, especially AcuDesign, maybe there is and I don't know it. 

Am I the only one that needs them?


Re: Needle Threader

Deb Keldrauk
 

Thank you Jim - This is why I love this group. You are so honest. I am the one who started this tread "this time" I know it will have more go rounds. If you really look at the needle threader mechanics it's kind of surprising that has worked so well for so long. I have a choice here, I can hate on Janome and feel disappointed in my otherwise pretty fantastic machine or I can just learn to automatically do the task of threading in another way. So from pushing the lock button and pulling the thread to the side (then having to remember to tap the unlock b4 I try to sew) to reaching into my drawer and taking out yet another do-hickey to get the job done. I just ordered a pack of 3 from Amazon bless you.
Deb in CA


Re: Needle Threader

Connie
 

Jim,

You are serious about this little manual needle threader?    I will place Amazon order yet today. The threader on my 15000 did not work initially at the dealer on day of purchase.  It was almost a deal breaker for me deciding to purchase the machine.  Several trips back  for adjustments and he finally offered to replace the threader.  Unfortunately this did not result in a threader that consistently works for more than just a few times. Even different brands of similar weight embroidery thread can make the threader cranky !  


It's a good threader. Just GENTLY press against the needle with the thread in the threader. When it finds the eye it will go in and you just push to get the thread in. Use the hook end to grab the thread end and you're done!


Re: Fw: Westalee Ruler Foot

JudyK B
 

Vicki,
Here is the Janome Ruler Foot. If you check out the Craftsy class taught by Amy Johnson, she starts out by saying that Janome doesn't recommend this foot be used on the 15000 as the auto lift function can cause damage to the machine and any damage will not be covered by any Janome warranty.
Sorry it took me a while to go back and search where I found the information so that I could authenticate it for you.
Judy


On Friday, May 19, 2017 9:01 AM, "'Vikki Youngmeyer' vikkiy@... [janome12000]" wrote:


 
I’m skeptical of phrases such as “everything I’ve read” says to do or not to do something. Who is saying this – Westalee, Janome, people on lists who have tried and succeeded/failed. We handle the Westalee products and Janome machines at our LQS and I have not come across any literature indicating problems from either company. Can you give me a link to these sources? I have not used the high shank foot on my 15000. What I have used are some of the Westalee rulers on my Handi Quilter Avante 18 using its standard quilting foot. They were purchased along with a High Shank foot designed for the 15000.
 
Vikki
From: janome12000@... [mailto:janome12000@...]
Sent: Thursday, May 18, 2017 10:43 PM
To: janome12000@...
Subject: Re: Fw: [janome12000] Westalee Ruler Foot
 
 
Vicki, I also have the 15000 but everything I read said do not use on the 15000 due to the possible damage if/when the "foot up" function is activated. It was really stressed strongly.
 
I have the 6600P also and being a high shank too, I plan on using them on it. I am a bit concerned about the 15000 use.
 
Judy B
Houston
 
On Thursday, May 18, 2017 5:19 PM, "Judy Biles jjbiles@... [janome12000]" wrote:
 
 
I did order for my high shank Janome 6600P, thanks Ann.
 
Judy
 
On Thursday, May 18, 2017 3:44 PM, "Ann Jones anahita2868@... [janome12000]" wrote:
 
 
re Westalee rulers. When ordering these rulers one should state which machine one is using. They make a range of thicknesses accordingly.
On the Westalee site each ruler has a dropdown menu regarding this. 
Is it possible you purchased a size not suitable for your HQ? I have a range of this brand of ruler as live in au and add to collection when I can- the circle ruler with a pin is fun and  Westalee's Janet is a master at using them. She gave a great class at the last show here.
 
with regard
Ann
 
 
 
Sent from Yahoo7 Mail. Get the app
 
On Thursday, 18 May 2017, 21:00, "Monika monika.murnane@... [janome12000]" wrote:
 
 
Oh I was thinking about how to use them on a Longarm as that is what I have. But on the domestic machines the template does not attach to the quilt.

Sent from my iPhone
 
 
 



Re: Needle Threader

Ceil J
 

I only had a problem once (and it was my fault) until today, when, I'm guessing for the first time, I used the Janome blue-tipped needle.  I usually use the Organ needles which I thought were the same as the blue tip but the threader would not thread that needle and I had a rough time with it too!  When I took it out and put the Organ needle back in, no problem.  The blue-tipped needle didn't fix what I was hoping it would anyway and the Organ needles work well so I guess I see no reason to use the blue-tipped Janome needles.  Again, no problem with my needle threader until trying to use a Janome needle.  Does not make sense.
Ceil


Re: Lighter weight machines

susies.stitches@...
 

Hi Cheryl,
Thanks for your input!  I have been considering the Skyline S9.  It just depends on how heavy it is, and if my 12000 is worth enough to trade for it.  I can't lift the 15000 at all.  Most shops will get the machines in and out of the car, but I have to be able to load and unload it on my end.  I can use the trolley for the 12000 to make it easier. I'll be happy to get a used one; I trust my dealer completely to take care of any problems.  I'll go check the prices again - I have all kinds of numbers swimming around in my head🙃  I'll keep you posted.  Sue


Back From Repair - now Loud Whine Noise

Sheri-A
 

My 15000 started skipping stitches, breaking thread, and thread pulling out of the take-up bar over a month ago.  I took it in for annual maintenance and explained at the time.  When I picked it up, the skipped stitches and thread breakage continued.  I took it back in last Saturday and spent time with the tech telling him I thought the needle was not always catching the thread.  I was using the quarter inch seam and foot, and straight stitch plate (going through the right hole).


They called me to come and pick up my machine and told me it was Needle to Hook clearance that needed to be fixed.  When I started sewing today I'm hearing a new noise - it sounds like a whine when the motor is running.  Because I always was so proud of how quite this machine is, I knew there was a new (bothersome) problem.


I went on youtube to listen to the macine on the videos and the whine is not there.  I'll take it back in, but I don't have full confidence that the techs are that experienced - based on the fact I'm now needing to take it in a 3rd time.


Any thoughts?  I love this machine and having this ongoing problem is making me sick!


Replacing bobbin case

susies.stitches@...
 

I can't seem to put the bobbin case in properly.  I watched some videos, and understand how it should go, but I can't seem to get it flat.  I hate taking it out, but wanted to clean out underneath.  I use microbrushes, and they work beautifully.  It has a very small (felt?) tip that fits into all the small spaces that are so hard to reach.  Theyre like dust magnets, and I'm always amazed at what they pull out.  I just hate trying to replace it again.  Does it go in at an angle?  Usually I can kind of jiggle it into place, but today it won't work.  The videos I watched didn't really show how it gets put in.  Are there any videos or written directions I can try?  I don't want to drag out the 12000; it's all together at last, and I don't want to risk losing parts of it before I sell or trade it!  I'd like to get a used 500e and trade up to the 4120 from my 3160.  It remains to be seen whether the 12000 is worth enough in a trade.  I tried to find prices for used ones to get an idea of what I'd have to pay, but all the sites said to contact them for more information.  I trust my dealer to give me a fair trade, but have no idea if the used 500e is worth more than the 12000.  I'm still paying for the 15000, and can't add any substantial amount to what I'm paying.  I'm just wondering if I'm looking through rose colores glasses!  No sense in having unrealistic expectations.  I'm finding that going to open sews and embroidery retreats are the only way I devote the time to sewing/embroidery.  Any words of wisdom?  Sue Raabe


Did you remove the needle plate first? It can be removed (with difficulty) if the plate is on, but it's nearly impossible to put it back with the plate on. Note that there is a small arrow on the bobbin case. It matches a similar arrow on the silver piece to the right of the bobbin area. Tip it slightly and it should slide right in.


Re: Needle Threader

Cas <cas@...>
 

It makes sense why it is so fussy, and easy to set off kilter.  What doesn’t make sense is all our friends saying how the threader on their Brother, Bernina, insert whatever their favorite machine is here _____ has a threader that works every time!  Also, if we sew with those machines in the store they DO work every time.  LOL.

 

I really am happy with mine since the last time I got it back.  I don’t know if he put a different, improved,  part in or learned how to calibrate it, or took the time to calibrate it with a smaller needle.  Perhaps I am more careful with it, making absolutely sure the needle is always up all the way and all that.  Either way, it has been working ever since.


Cas

 

From: janome12000@... [mailto:janome12000@...]
Sent: Saturday, May 20, 2017 8:47 AM
To: janome12000@...
Subject: [janome12000] Re: Needle Threader

 

 

After 25 years of repairing Janome machines, I have to agree that the needle threader is the single most common problem. In just about every class we ever had, I spent the first 15-20 minutes repairing threaders before class. There is a back story there, which I reluctantly tell at the risk of encountering a blamestorm.

 

The mechanics of a needle threader are fairly simple. Something has to go through the eye of the needle, either to push thread through, or hook it and pull it through. When we first entered the business, the threader on most top of line models used a tiny blade on a push button to shove the thread through the eye. This was a decent idea, except when the blade was not perfectly lined up with the eye. One quick push and the necessarily thin blade would fold over, never to work again.

 

Because I had more experience with computers than most (or really any) other dealers, I was asked to provide input on the Memory Craft 10000. I stressed to the Janome engineers how much of a problem the threader was, and that it needed a redesign. Their response was the motorized threader activated by a touch on the front panel. It was a good design, BUT if everything was not perfectly aligned the hook would not line up with the eye and it would be deflected left or right, never to work again. The first models of the 10000 also had some problems with sketchy motors, resulting in a sticker on the door showing how to get the threader back up so you could sew.

 

Since the 10000 they have stuck with the motorized, hook-through-the-back method of threading. For it to work a lot of things have to happen:

- The machine needs to stop with the needle up at exactly the same place every time.

- The needle needs to be positioned all the way up in the needle clamp.

- The needle must be absolutely straight.

- The eye of the needle needs to be larger than the hook, which can be questionable for size 10 and lower.

- The operator needs to perform all the steps correctly. Pull the thread too much and it can misalign the hook.

If even one thing is slightly off, the hook will not go through the eye. It can bend over, or deflect left or right. Once that happens you're doomed to a service visit. On the technician side it's a maddening repair. Once the hook has been replace everything needs to be realigned again, a tedious process that usually results in "cowboy words". Most repairs are done using a new needle, size 14. If the threader is calibrated to work with a 14 it may not work with an 11 or smaller, because the hook is either slightly above or below the dead center of the eye on a 14. Add to this a large number of machines needing repair and a technician who is light on patience, and you have a recipe for a needle threader that works for a short while and then fails again.

 

Ironically the most reliable threader is not built into the machine at all. It only requires the operator to hold it GENTLY against the needle until the built-in blade finds the eye, then push to poke the thread through. If (when) the blade gets bent it's inexpensive to replace. Sometimes old school is better!


Re: Needle Threader

Mary E
 

The manual needle threader Jim suggested has been a valuable tool for threading my 15000. It actually takes less time than the automatic threader. The mechanical threader on my DC2014 works every time.
Mary

On Saturday, May 20, 2017, Anne Parker lokicat6@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:
 

I love the threader on the 15000 - but it is temperamental.

I sometimes think a more manual threader would be easier to operate on a daily basis.  At least you can actually see what is happening.  The only way you can see what is happening on the 15000 is if you video it with your camera/phone and play it back in slow time.

I also think that the adjustment is critical - you may just have a machine where the adjustment isn't right - maybe the needle stop is a miniscule bit out and the threader is a miniscle bit out.  I count myself lucky that I have a machine that works most of the time.  In fact one of the only two issues I have are when I try too thick a thread with too thin a needle.  There are specifications in the manual on the thickness of thread and size of needle it will work with.  I also don't use it with metallic thread. (same as I don't use the cutter with metallic thread). 

The second issue is when I change needle - which of course leads me to maybe use a needle for longer than I should.  It is quite specific on where the needle needs to be placed in the needle clamp.  There is room for manoever, at least in my needle clamp.  The needle can be secured at a slight angle to the horizontal which will mean that the threader hook just glances off the side of the needle or at worse gets temporarily caught at an angle in the needle.  So far that hasn't bent the needle threader hook (fingers crossed).

What I now do is use the opposite end of a manual threader that allows you to hold the needle and push it hard up into the clamp whilst at the same time turning it as far to the left as possible - you may not even be able to see that you are turning it but just push it hard.  Then tighten the clamp.

This may take a few goes until the needle threads on testing.  Once I get the machine to thread a needle once I don't have an issue again until I change to another needle.  I find it easier to use topstitch needles which have a bigger eye so allow a bit more leeway for threading, but I changed to an embroidery needle last week and it only took me 2 goes to get it to thread.  I don't really use univesal needles in it anymore because that has a smaller eye than topstitch or embroidery needles.

Anne
www.sewingtales.wordpress.com

https://www.flickr.com/photos/94302460@N03/sets/

"If you want to be happy - give up living your life to other peoples expectations"


Re: Needle Threader

Anne Parker
 

I love the threader on the 15000 - but it is temperamental.

I sometimes think a more manual threader would be easier to operate on a daily basis.  At least you can actually see what is happening.  The only way you can see what is happening on the 15000 is if you video it with your camera/phone and play it back in slow time.

I also think that the adjustment is critical - you may just have a machine where the adjustment isn't right - maybe the needle stop is a miniscule bit out and the threader is a miniscle bit out.  I count myself lucky that I have a machine that works most of the time.  In fact one of the only two issues I have are when I try too thick a thread with too thin a needle.  There are specifications in the manual on the thickness of thread and size of needle it will work with.  I also don't use it with metallic thread. (same as I don't use the cutter with metallic thread). 

The second issue is when I change needle - which of course leads me to maybe use a needle for longer than I should.  It is quite specific on where the needle needs to be placed in the needle clamp.  There is room for manoever, at least in my needle clamp.  The needle can be secured at a slight angle to the horizontal which will mean that the threader hook just glances off the side of the needle or at worse gets temporarily caught at an angle in the needle.  So far that hasn't bent the needle threader hook (fingers crossed).

What I now do is use the opposite end of a manual threader that allows you to hold the needle and push it hard up into the clamp whilst at the same time turning it as far to the left as possible - you may not even be able to see that you are turning it but just push it hard.  Then tighten the clamp.

This may take a few goes until the needle threads on testing.  Once I get the machine to thread a needle once I don't have an issue again until I change to another needle.  I find it easier to use topstitch needles which have a bigger eye so allow a bit more leeway for threading, but I changed to an embroidery needle last week and it only took me 2 goes to get it to thread.  I don't really use univesal needles in it anymore because that has a smaller eye than topstitch or embroidery needles.

Anne
www.sewingtales.wordpress.com

https://www.flickr.com/photos/94302460@N03/sets/

"If you want to be happy - give up living your life to other peoples expectations"


Re: Needle Threader

Pixey
 

I have several Janome machines and the needle threaders are fairly inconsistent.  That said, usually when the needle threader is not working correctly on the more recent machines, it is because I have forgotten one or more of the necessary steps to go through (such as manually lowering the presser foot on the 500e).  That said threading the needle has become a complex process and sometimes it is not user error, so I do keep manual hand threaders next to every machine, just in case. 

I will say, the only built-in Janome needle threader I have had work consistently was the one on my MC3000.  It is a manual, all metal, low profile threader that was nowhere near as persnickety as any of the threaders on my other machines...and which is why I still have this machine for basic sewing, even though it does not have all the bells and whistles of the newer machines.

Regards,
Pixey

Sent from my iPad

On May 20, 2017, at 8:47 AM, Josephine Symons jomyra45@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

I'm afraid I'll have to add my name to this list! It's a wonderful machine, such a pity that the needle threader is so unreliable and frustrating.  I've often wondered why nothing has been done about it. Interesting to note that later models like the Skyline S9 and the 9400 have much more reliable threaders. 

On 20 May 2017, at 4:31 pm, 'audrey chase' Contessa@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

Couldn’t agree more. I have the 15000 and the needle threader works only when it feels like it. Drives me bonkers.


Re: Needle Threader

Jim Stutsman
 

After 25 years of repairing Janome machines, I have to agree that the needle threader is the single most common problem. In just about every class we ever had, I spent the first 15-20 minutes repairing threaders before class. There is a back story there, which I reluctantly tell at the risk of encountering a blamestorm.

The mechanics of a needle threader are fairly simple. Something has to go through the eye of the needle, either to push thread through, or hook it and pull it through. When we first entered the business, the threader on most top of line models used a tiny blade on a push button to shove the thread through the eye. This was a decent idea, except when the blade was not perfectly lined up with the eye. One quick push and the necessarily thin blade would fold over, never to work again.

Because I had more experience with computers than most (or really any) other dealers, I was asked to provide input on the Memory Craft 10000. I stressed to the Janome engineers how much of a problem the threader was, and that it needed a redesign. Their response was the motorized threader activated by a touch on the front panel. It was a good design, BUT if everything was not perfectly aligned the hook would not line up with the eye and it would be deflected left or right, never to work again. The first models of the 10000 also had some problems with sketchy motors, resulting in a sticker on the door showing how to get the threader back up so you could sew.

Since the 10000 they have stuck with the motorized, hook-through-the-back method of threading. For it to work a lot of things have to happen:
- The machine needs to stop with the needle up at exactly the same place every time.
- The needle needs to be positioned all the way up in the needle clamp.
- The needle must be absolutely straight.
- The eye of the needle needs to be larger than the hook, which can be questionable for size 10 and lower.
- The operator needs to perform all the steps correctly. Pull the thread too much and it can misalign the hook.
If even one thing is slightly off, the hook will not go through the eye. It can bend over, or deflect left or right. Once that happens you're doomed to a service visit. On the technician side it's a maddening repair. Once the hook has been replace everything needs to be realigned again, a tedious process that usually results in "cowboy words". Most repairs are done using a new needle, size 14. If the threader is calibrated to work with a 14 it may not work with an 11 or smaller, because the hook is either slightly above or below the dead center of the eye on a 14. Add to this a large number of machines needing repair and a technician who is light on patience, and you have a recipe for a needle threader that works for a short while and then fails again.

Ironically the most reliable threader is not built into the machine at all. It only requires the operator to hold it GENTLY against the needle until the built-in blade finds the eye, then push to poke the thread through. If (when) the blade gets bent it's inexpensive to replace. Sometimes old school is better!


Re: Needle Threader

Josephine Symons <jomyra45@...>
 

I'm afraid I'll have to add my name to this list! It's a wonderful machine, such a pity that the needle threader is so unreliable and frustrating.  I've often wondered why nothing has been done about it. Interesting to note that later models like the Skyline S9 and the 9400 have much more reliable threaders. 

On 20 May 2017, at 4:31 pm, 'audrey chase' Contessa@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

Couldn’t agree more. I have the 15000 and the needle threader works only when it feels like it. Drives me bonkers.


Re: Needle Threader

MarieD
 

I had the Janome 300e and its threader worked first time, EVERY time. I now
have the 500e and it seems to work like the newer Janome combo machines this
list is about. I have to keep a copy of the manual pages showing the
threading sequence and follow it step by step and still the threader works
only half the time.


I love the machine, I am mechanically inclined, but wish this machine's
threader would work as well as my previous one.


Marie

-----Original Message-----
From: 'audrey chase' Contessa@btinternet.com [janome12000]
Sent: Saturday, May 20, 2017 4:31 AM
To: janome12000@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [janome12000] Re: Needle Threader


Couldn’t agree more. I have the 15000 and the needle threader works only
when it feels like it. Drives me bonkers.


Re: Needle Threader

audrey chase <Contessa@...>
 

Couldn’t agree more. I have the 15000 and the needle threader works only when it feels like it. Drives me bonkers.

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