Date   

Re: servicing my 15000

ceilsews <no_reply@...>
 

Anne,
This has been on my mind a lot.  I played with my shredder and found that my metal letter opener will not cause it to shut off, nor will plastic as it shreds credit cards.  I then stuffed a cloth that I use to dust my screen into the opening and it did not shut it down.  The only thing that stops it seems to be my fingers so I tried my elbow and it shut down when I place my elbow over it. (Not sure exactly what it senses)
Checking for these sensors online, I found a replacement sensor for the shredder at $18.  Of course, while that is retail, it's not the type that would be needed for our machines, I don't think.  While it's rather small, it would be just another thing that could go wrong and might give a false sense that we need not be careful if the sensor would prevent mishaps.  However, they're now putting sensors on cars so the car will help prevent you from hitting someone/something, so I think the sensor idea has more positives than negatives.  Brother has a laser light that somehow fits in there, and there seems to be a little room in the door.  By the way, I liked the laser beam in the Brother, it would be good as a guide, especially for half square triangles.  But did not like the overall feel of the Brother or its stitches!
I would think that a finger guard might interfere with the threader and prevent easy viewing. 
After seeing what happens when rotary cutters slip, I bought some rulers that work well to help prevent problems and would be willing to have my machine retrofitted with a sensor to protect my fingers.
Too scared to sew now... :)  Think I'll work on taxes!
Ceil


Re: servicing my 15000

Anne Parker
 

I'm just doing another of my thought experiements - trying to figure out how a sensor would have to work. 

It would need to tell the diffrence between a finger or a metal part of an attachment moving under it I guess - like the ruffler.  I'm thinking it would need to be something that could be selected or not depending on the user and what they were doing.

To me it would just be an added complication.  For only a few pounds, if you really feel you need it, you can get guards that will fit on with the same screw that attaches the ankle (so securing both) but I have never felt that I needed something like that. 

Having sewn through the side of my finger twice I have no doubt that I will definitely not do it again - but I am also sure that I will not let my 9 year old granddaughter loose on the machine until she has had much more experience with my handcrank machines and much less powerful electric machines.

Anne
www.sewingtales.wordpress.com

https://www.flickr.com/photos/94302460@N03/sets/

"If we could live happy and healthy lives without harming others... why wouldn't we?" Edgar's Mission | www.edgarsmission.org.au


Re: Jim - Ruler Foot MC12000 - Part numbers

Jane Dunne
 

Jim, I am sure you have covered this before however I did check on your app and didn't find it. I was hoping it would be covered in the video with the ruler foot and it wasn't however would it be possible to do so? How do you turn off the pivot action? Thank you. Jane Sent from my iPad

Pivoting his chair back to the keyboard, Jim types this:
If you tap the "Search" tab in the app, then type "pivot" you'll find it under the Applique video. It's at about the 2:25 mark. It's also in the manual on page 35.


Re: Jim - Ruler Foot MC12000 - Part numbers

juliadlf1 <no_reply@...>
 

Thanks Jim. Yes, I did watch that video on YouTube. Searching now for the parts.
Julia


Re: Free Embroidery Designs from Janome

SewKitty <stevovaso@...>
 

Thanks Cas. I just downloaded them.



From: "'cas' cas@... [janome12000]"
To: janome12000@...
Sent: Friday, April 8, 2016 9:51 AM
Subject: [janome12000] Free Embroidery Designs from Janome


Re: servicing my 15000

Carolyn Gazerro <cmgazerro@...>
 

That is probably why the 15000 has the lock feature...because it is so powerful.


I guess it boils down to this. As a child you use training wheels to learn how to ride a bike. As an adult you figure it out on your own. Accidents go with the territory.


Carolyn 🌹
Sent from my iPad


Re: needle threader - again

bdake@sbcglobal.net
 

I have a bent needle threader. Is it possible for me to order a replacement part and put it on myself? I can use a screw driver. Lol

Deciding against the "DIY Home Appendectomy Kit", Jim says:
Before going down that path, if the hook is only slightly bent you might try straightening it. Start with an old, but not bent needle in the machine. Bring down the threader. The hook will probably fall on one side of the needle or the other. CAREFULLY pull the needle forward, then left or right so the hook goes through the eye. Don't pull enough to bend the needle, just enough so the hook goes in. Then use a very small flat blade screwdriver (and magnifying glass) to gently bend the hook in the direction needed to make it straight. Be patient, it may take some time as the hook is made to not bend easily. After you think you have it, test. Be prepared to repeat. Once it seems to be working, discard the old needle and put in a new one. Test again. I've fixed a lot of threaders this way.

If that didn't work you can order a new part, although this will involve the cooperation of your dealer who may want to charge as much for the part as for the repair. Part numbers:
12000 - 846588014
15000 - 862626004

Now comes the tricky bit. On the 12000 the threader just snaps off. Pull it down until it pops off, but don't put the new one on yet. TAKE THE NEEDLE OUT! The new part is not adjusted for your machine and if you just snap it on and try to thread you could easily bend the hook and ruin it. Instead, after pulling the threader down, loosen the needle clamp a lot, so you can move the needle around a bit. Carefully put it in the clamp and see if the hook is lined up. Chances are very good that you will need to loosen the tiny Phillips screw on the threader so you can move the hook. Loosen just enough to move it, then adjust up/down/left/right until it lines up. Tighten the needle clamp to re-check. This process usually will need to be repeated several times to get the hook perfectly aligned. Once it is, tighten the tiny screw and hope it won't move the hook when you do.

The 15000 is much more challenging. First you have to remove a set screw holding the part you are replacing. When you do that all the moving parts of the threader will come off. You should probably video this so you'll be able to get them back together, as it is VERY confusing. There is also a tiny Phillips screw on this threader, to the left of the one holding it all together. As with the 12000, you can move the hook by loosening this screw. However this threader is going to come down and go right back up, so you're not going to be able line up the hook. That requires going into the diagnostics, which I will not post here. There are settings in there that can turn your machine into a non-functioning brick if done incorrectly. If you really want to do this, ask your dealer to show you how to activate them.


Re: servicing my 15000

MarieD
 

No one suggested suing anyone. To me, a safety sensor would be in the same
category as seat belts, a safety feature. Probably would make a TOL machine
price soar even higher, though.


Now that I'm getting old, I could use all the help I can get. I seem to do
some things I'd never have done earlier in my life now that my cognition
is weakening. I would never call them Stupid, just a fact of life.


MarieD

-----Original Message-----
From: 'Vikki Youngmeyer' vikkiy@windstream.net [janome12000]
Sent: Saturday, April 09, 2016 12:23 AM
To: janome12000@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [janome12000] Re: servicing my 15000


should I sue the tennis shoe company?


In response to:
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I wonder if sewing machines could be equipped with a safety sensor for a
half or quarter inch diameter circle under the needle. It seems like
industrial machines must have such a device. Maybe that should go on our
"ask for" list from Janome! My paper shredder stops if my fingers get
anywhere near the opening. It seems the same technology can be put on our
machines.
Ceil


Re: servicing my 15000

ceilsews <no_reply@...>
 

Vikki,
I'm sorry if my suggestion upset you.  I read my post over again and I don't mention suing anyone, just suggesting that the machines could be made safer as has been done with shredders.  Yes, we are all responsible for our own actions but technology can make us safer (if not smarter)!
Ceil


---In janome12000@..., <vikkiy@...> wrote :

Really??!! What about just being responsible and teaching our children to be responsible? If something goes wrong and we do something stupid like not paying attention to what we are doing, it’s someone else’s fault because there wasn’t a warning. I can trip over a shoelace and break a leg – should I sue the tennis shoe company?

 

Vikki

 

From: janome12000@... [mailto:janome12000@...] On Behalf Of ceilsews
Sent: Friday, April 8, 2016 7:24 PM
To: janome12000@...
Subject: [janome12000] Re: servicing my 15000

 

 

I wonder if sewing machines could be equipped with a safety sensor for a half or quarter inch diameter circle under the needle.  It seems like industrial machines must have such a device.  Maybe that should go on our "ask for" list from Janome!  My paper shredder stops if my fingers get anywhere near the opening.  It seems the same technology can be put on our machines.
Ceil


needle threader - again

Lucy Akers
 

My new 15000 was threading needles just fine and I was so happy after reading here of people having problems. But, when I put in a topstitch needle, it didn't find the eye. I know it is because of the needle and not the machine.

However, is there any way to manually use the needle threader? On the 12000, you can push the needle over a bit with your finger to get the eye in the threader.


Eyeing the situation, Jim says:

A topstitch needle has a larger eye than others, so sure that it's all the way up in the clamp. If it missed the eye, the hook may have hit the shaft of the needle and gotten bent. There really isn't a way to use the threader manually.


Re: servicing my 15000

Anne Parker
 

I can empathise.

I've done this twice now with the 15000 when trying to get really close to some piping, as I was having to hold the piping back in place. Luckily for me I just went down the side of my nail - and there was no blood on the white fabric I was sewing!

It's the first time I've ever sewn through my finger on any machine and I've been sewing for over 50 years - typical that it's the most powerful machine I have used!

Anne
www.sewingtales.wordpress.com

https://www.flickr.com/photos/94302460@N03/sets/

"If we could live happy and healthy lives without harming others... why wouldn't we?" Edgar's Mission | www.edgarsmission.org.au


Re: servicing my 15000

Vikki Youngmeyer
 

Really??!! What about just being responsible and teaching our children to be responsible? If something goes wrong and we do something stupid like not paying attention to what we are doing, it’s someone else’s fault because there wasn’t a warning. I can trip over a shoelace and break a leg – should I sue the tennis shoe company?

 

Vikki

 

From: janome12000@... [mailto:janome12000@...] On Behalf Of ceilsews
Sent: Friday, April 8, 2016 7:24 PM
To: janome12000@...
Subject: [janome12000] Re: servicing my 15000

 

 

I wonder if sewing machines could be equipped with a safety sensor for a half or quarter inch diameter circle under the needle.  It seems like industrial machines must have such a device.  Maybe that should go on our "ask for" list from Janome!  My paper shredder stops if my fingers get anywhere near the opening.  It seems the same technology can be put on our machines.
Ceil


Re: servicing my 15000

Carolyn Gazerro <cmgazerro@...>
 

Thanks everyone for your concerns. Finger is looking good with hardly any sign of injury. I am truly blest not to have more damage. Luckily this was the first time in my 75 years.


Carolyn 🌹
Sent from my iPad


Re: servicing my 15000

Carolyn Gazerro <cmgazerro@...>
 

I understand they have machines with safety guards for school sewing classes.


Carolyn 🌹
Sent from my iPad


Re: servicing my 15000

My-Stitches
 

Ouch! I hope your finger heals quickly. I sewed through a finger
when I was about 12 and I still remember it, vividly!


Mary




Brought my 15000 in for servicing Tuesday. Was due for two year check
up but had to take it in for a sewing issue. Now I bought the machine
because it was a strong working machine suitable for home deco. They
did not tell me it would not sew through fingers. Yep that is what it
attempted to do. Finger got caught as I was clearing a piece of felt
while embroidering a design. Took me about 15 minutes to
clear my finger from needle and embroidery foot.


Thankful I was not more seriously injured


Carolyn


Re: servicing my 15000

Cat - N
 

Oh my goodness!  Wow!  I am happy those who had the displeasure of this experience came out of it okay,and I sure hope you heal quickly.  Owie!!!  I put that right at the top of my list of 'Things NOT To Do' !!!

- Cat (FL)


Re: servicing my 15000

Carolyn <cmgazerro@...>
 

Ouch. I am fortunate the needle pierced the tip my finger which only required me cleaning the wound. Looks like the timing is out of whack to complete the stitches. The machine takes two stitches and then next stitch swerves to the right but does not complete the stitches Bobbin is in tact with no punctures.


Will be interesting to find out final diagnoses.
Carolyn


Sent from my iPhone


Re: servicing my 15000

cas <cas@...>
 

Scary!  I wish I could lower my pressure foot a little bit when using the pivot function.  I have it set as low as it goes but it seems too high.
 

Sent: Friday, April 08, 2016 4:34 PM
Subject: [janome12000] Re: servicing my 15000
 
 

Glad you were able to salvage the finger. For reference, the MB-4 is fully capable of sewing completely through a finger, nail and all. Unfortunately the needle will likely break inside the finger, leading to about an hour of minor surgery at the Doc-in-the-Box to get it out. Thanks to the doctor's skill, the finger is fully functional and has no nerve damage. The MB-4 also survived without damage, although a little adjustment was needed in the presser foot height. I do not recommend trying this, ever, by anyone.


Re: servicing my 15000

cas <cas@...>
 

Hope it heals fast Carolyn!  I bet that scared the heck outta you!  I tried to sew mine twice, broke my acrylic nails but they stopped the needle. 
Cas


Re: servicing my 15000

sandy k
 

Yes very dangerous. I did it too. Turned machine off then back on, pressed whatever it said to do and the needle came right up out of going completely thru nail and all. No doc and did not hurt after! Crazy! 

SandyK Magnolia Springs Quilts
From my iPhone 

On Apr 8, 2016, at 6:34 PM, jim.stutsman@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

Glad you were able to salvage the finger. For reference, the MB-4 is fully capable of sewing completely through a finger, nail and all. Unfortunately the needle will likely break inside the finger, leading to about an hour of minor surgery at the Doc-in-the-Box to get it out. Thanks to the doctor's skill, the finger is fully functional and has no nerve damage. The MB-4 also survived without damage, although a little adjustment was needed in the presser foot height. I do not recommend trying this, ever, by anyone.

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