Date   

Re: Another Question

Meryl Margolies
 

As always, you are the bestest


Another Question

Meryl Margolies
 

How do we resize a design, keeping stitch density, in MBX 4.5? I can do it in Embird, but can't figure out how to do it in MBX. I guess I could continue to research, but you guys are a plethora of information and I can be embroidering and making quilt blocks while waiting for the answer.

Persistently attempting to overcome his own density, Jim says:
The first thing to understand is that resizing is, at best, an imperfect process. You always want to use a design that is as close as possible to the desired size, because ALL resizing processes will have an effect on how the design stitches out. That said, the basics of resizing in MBX 4.5 are simple:

1. Open the stitch file (JEF, PES, etc. unless you have JAN, which is ALWAYS the best option) in EasyDesign.

2. If you started with a JAN file, resize and export in the desired format. You're done.

3. Assuming you had a stitch file (anything but JAN), understand that a LOT has happened to it in the mandatory conversion from stitch file to JAN. First, all underlay stitches have become classified as "Manual" stitches in Object Details. During resizing these will get longer or shorter, but the will not be regenerated for the new size. This alone can cause some unexpected things to happen when stitching. Next is the regular embroidery stitches, which MBX attempts to convert into objects using its best guess as to what type of stitch they are. This process is good, but not infallible, and you could easily get a few "Manual" stitch types. Again, manual stitches change size but ignore density.

4. Select all and resize as needed. The less you change, the better. Be VERY CAREFUL if you add other objects, such as lettering, to the design. The "Manual" stitches that were detected can cause some very unusual behavior to added objects. I first saw this when a customer added lettering to a design that she had resized. The lettering came immediately after a block of manual stitches and that caused the first letter to be pink, even though the entire sequence of letters was one object of green color.

Tweaks: Sometimes you can remove objects detected as manual and use the Reshape tool to restore the object to its correct shape. You can also remove all of the manual underlay stitches, and then assign new underlay to the remaining objects.

In summary, if a design is fairly simple, you can just open the stitch file, resize and export or save. This will usually turn out OK. But if its a complex design with 20 or more colors in elaborate patterns you will almost surely be disappointed. Don't make the mistake, as many have done, of believing that opening a stitch file (not JAN) and saving it as JAN will magically make it a true JAN file as if you had digitized it yourself. It won't. Finally, if the amount of size change is small (+/- 10%) you can just open the stitch file in EasyEdit, resize and save. EasyEdit will NOT maintain density, nor will it add or remove stitches, but it will, in most cases, resize a design to something you can use. Of course for small size changes you can do it in your machine as well.

This is probably way more than you wanted to hear, but it's really important to understand how MBX behaves in resize situations.


Re: 2 questions

Meryl Margolies
 

Thank you. You are my hero!!!


Re: MBX 5.0 upgrade

Cheryl Paul
 

Oh, just another not - my EQ7 for Mac had an update, I wasn’t aware of - as soon as I did it the program was again stable.


Cheryl - Saskatoon


Re: MBX 5.0 upgrade

Cheryl Paul
 

Thanks Jim. All seems to be working well at the moment. Perhaps there was a Windows Update that needed to be completed. I haven’t updated V5 yet as I’ve been focusing on that Artistic Edge Simple Cut Software. I take challenges and dares very seriously so I have lots of homework, but it is fun.


Thanks again.


Cheryl - Saskatoon


Re: We interrupt your normal list reading to tell you ...

blue_lak <no_reply@...>
 

Is it recognizing the folder the file is in on the USB, or just not seeing that file?


---In janome12000@..., <Fmjfrazier@...> wrote :

I did export to the flash drive and my  12,000 machine would not read it.


-----Original Message-----
From: maggie cooper maggiecoops@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...>
To: janome12000 <janome12000@...>
Sent: Fri, Feb 19, 2016 8:58 am
Subject: [janome12000] Re: We interrupt your normal list reading to tell you ...

 
Virginia, the design icons change, but the formats wouldn't have changed. Did you use Easy design to send the design to the USB or Hatch, did you use Transfer or Export, as I haven't had problems exporting a stitch file to a usb to use on my 9900, I haven't tried the Transfer.

The reason the design file icons change is because Hatch was the most recent embroidery software installed, V5 and Hatch use the identical icons so all my embroidery files wear the white square with blue D on them, including native Embird files. I'm too lazy to tell my computer to choose specific programs to open certain files or change the icons. I don't know why your machine refused to recognise the desig n, I will flag it up but without more information I doubt that will enough for the folks at Wilcom to replicate it.
mags


2 questions

Meryl Margolies
 

These might be simple, but...


1. What's the best way to embroider on a square of fabric that's going to be set on point? Rotate the fabric before hooping, or rotate the design?

2. What's the best method/scissors to use to cut away stabilizer? Must they be stabilizer only scissors so as not to ruin them for regular fabric?


As always, thanks. You are all the best!!!


Always simple of mind, Jim says:

1. You want to hoop your fabric on the straight of grain to minimize distortion from the pull of the stitches. Rotate the design as needed.


2. Scissors are like ice cream. Everyone has their favorite and there is no right or wrong kind. You do want sharp scissors that cut all the way to the point. Stabilizer does not dull them any more than fabric, so it's fine to use the same scissors for both.


Re: We interrupt your normal list reading to tell you ...

Virginia
 

I did export to the flash drive and my  12,000 machine would not read it.


-----Original Message-----
From: maggie cooper maggiecoops@... [janome12000]
To: janome12000
Sent: Fri, Feb 19, 2016 8:58 am
Subject: [janome12000] Re: We interrupt your normal list reading to tell you ...

 
Virginia, the design icons change, but the formats wouldn't have changed. Did you use Easy design to send the design to the USB or Hatch, did you use Transfer or Export, as I haven't had problems exporting a stitch file to a usb to use on my 9900, I haven't tried the Transfer.

The reason the design file icons change is because Hatch was the most recent embroidery software installed, V5 and Hatch use the identical icons so all my embroidery files wear the white square with blue D on them, including native Embird files. I'm too lazy to tell my computer to choose specific programs to open certain files or change the icons. I don't know why your machine refused to recognise the desig n, I will flag it up but without more information I doubt that will enough for the folks at Wilcom to replicate it.
mags


Re: Twin Needles

cas <cas@...>
 

Thank you for helping me (us) learn Anne!  I guess I was thinking of the double stitching on jeans, some of which are really thick material,  and had a totally different idea of what the wing needle does as well.
Cas
 

Sent: Friday, February 19, 2016 9:57 AM
Subject: [janome12000] Re: Twin Needles
 
 

Cas

I really don't think the Heirloom twin needle is the right thing to use for unwoven fabrics, especially heavy ones.  The Heirloom twin needles, in which one has wings, as well as the single twin needle, are traditionally meant for sewing on lightweight fabric such as batitse, organza, organdie etc with very fine thread (a fine bobbin thread is good).  The technique is meant to be used for the sort of things you find on christening gowns, ring pillows etc and the needle pushes the weave of the fabric apart - not to say you couldn't experiment - I'm all for that! :0).  The type of stitches used means the needles repeatedly enter the same hole, thus ensuring that the fine sewing thread holds the fabric threads apart. You can actually achieve similar results using a number 18/110 universal needle, though you would need to work out how you are going to achieve the same pattern with only one needle. (but very useful on straight stitch only machines with only a small needle hole).

There are useful videos on You-tube if you want to following this up - and if you are 'into' Heirloom sewing I recommend Pauline Inesons book -  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Pauline-Ineson-Heirloom-Techniques-Beautiful/dp/B006W40LMU/ref=sr_1_sc_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1455904191&sr=8-2-spell&keywords=pauline+inestonoe - with over 35 sewing techniques.

For suede you would probably need a Jeans needle, or even a Leather needle that was able to punch holes in the fabric as it sews.  I've never sewn on suede, but I have sewn on PVC and sailing canvas and for that I use a number 14/90 or 16/100 Jeans needle as I am usually using v69 UV stable marine thread which is a thicker bonded polyester thread (the numbering system is different to domestic thread and v69 is thicker than a number 30 cotton thread)
 
Anne
www.sewingtales.wordpress.com

https://www.flickr.com/photos/94302460@N03/sets/

"Live like someone left the gate open". Kimberly Burnham

 


Adjusting Sewing Machine Top Tension

cas <cas@...>
 


Re: Hatch Embroidery Software

rosematt11@ymail.com
 

Maybe I am confused by Point 1. I've just started to learn MBX 5.0 but have used earlier versions. They all write files to the major machine embroidery formats as exports, including Bernina, Brother, Babylock, Elna, Husk/Viking, Pfaff, Singer, Melco and Tajima; and of course Janome. While altering or digitizing, you will work and save as an Emb or Jan file, then export to the other formats.


Re: Rewind NEB bobbin onto Janome bobbin

Linda Rayburn
 

Great thanks Jim. I think I'll take it one bobbin at a time.
I thought I read somewhere there was some sort of  riser thing you can put in your bobbin case to to make the NEB the same height as the Janome Bobbin. Is that correct and if so what part # is it?

Linda

Wearing shoes with 4" thick soles, Jim stumbles onto the scene with this:
Perhaps you are thinking of the "Magic Bobbin Washer", which is a thin piece of plastic that supposedly prevents back spin on bobbins. Those would have no value at all with NEB bobbins, as they are too thin. Or you may be thinking of various posts that suggest using a penny or a nickel to raise up the bobbin. That's a very bad idea, setting the stage for disaster. We used NEB bobbins in the store for a time, and once in a while we would get one where the thread was actually tied onto the bobbin. Their bobbin thread is quite strong, and having it tied to the bobbin will nearly always pop the bobbin case out of position and cause damage. Your original plan of winding them onto Janome bobbins is far safer, even though it's tedious.


Re: Hatch Embroidery Software

Andrea LaVergne
 

Jim are you using El Capitan, VMware with a Windows 10 Virtual machine? Andrea

Yes, El Capitan 10.11.3 with VMware Fusion 8.1.0. I have VMs for all the various versions of Windows, but I am currently mostly using Windows 10.


Re: Twin Needles

Anne Parker
 

Cas

I really don't think the Heirloom twin needle is the right thing to use for unwoven fabrics, especially heavy ones.  The Heirloom twin needles, in which one has wings, as well as the single twin needle, are traditionally meant for sewing on lightweight fabric such as batitse, organza, organdie etc with very fine thread (a fine bobbin thread is good).  The technique is meant to be used for the sort of things you find on christening gowns, ring pillows etc and the needle pushes the weave of the fabric apart - not to say you couldn't experiment - I'm all for that! :0).  The type of stitches used means the needles repeatedly enter the same hole, thus ensuring that the fine sewing thread holds the fabric threads apart. You can actually achieve similar results using a number 18/110 universal needle, though you would need to work out how you are going to achieve the same pattern with only one needle. (but very useful on straight stitch only machines with only a small needle hole).

There are useful videos on You-tube if you want to following this up - and if you are 'into' Heirloom sewing I recommend Pauline Inesons book -  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Pauline-Ineson-Heirloom-Techniques-Beautiful/dp/B006W40LMU/ref=sr_1_sc_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1455904191&sr=8-2-spell&keywords=pauline+inestonoe - with over 35 sewing techniques.

For suede you would probably need a Jeans needle, or even a Leather needle that was able to punch holes in the fabric as it sews.  I've never sewn on suede, but I have sewn on PVC and sailing canvas and for that I use a number 14/90 or 16/100 Jeans needle as I am usually using v69 UV stable marine thread which is a thicker bonded polyester thread (the numbering system is different to domestic thread and v69 is thicker than a number 30 cotton thread)

Anne
www.sewingtales.wordpress.com

https://www.flickr.com/photos/94302460@N03/sets/

"Live like someone left the gate open". Kimberly Burnham

 


Rewind NEB bobbin onto Janome bobbin

Linda Rayburn
 

I have so many full NEB bobbins that I can no longer use since I bought my 15000. Would it be ok or advisable to rewind those bobbins onto Janome bobbins?


Thanks!

Linda


Calming down after watching paint dry for 10 hours, Jim says:

There is absolutely nothing wrong with winding them onto Janome bobbins. They contain very good bobbin thread, if you have the patience to do that!


Re: We interrupt your normal list reading to tell you ...

cmgazerro@...
 

Jim,
LOL.  Love your humor.  Gets point across in interesting ways.
Carolyn


Re: Reverse stitch with Accufeed?

Terry L
 

Thank you for this.  I had no idea.  I have been happily using the Accufeed foot just with piecing and like the results I get from the foot, but didn't even know about "activating" it.  I'll have to test it out to see what the results are like.
I am always learning new things here, thank you!
Terry



From: "comara0202@... [janome12000]"
To: janome12000@...
Sent: Thursday, February 18, 2016 9:48 PM
Subject: [janome12000] Re: Reverse stitch with Accufeed?

 
How do you activate the acufeed system?  I have the 12K.  Does putting the Acufeed attachment automatically activate the 'system'?  I've not found anything in the manual about an activation.  In fact, the manual barely mentions Acufeed.  I used Acufeed for stitch in ditch or one of the decorative stitches on my quilts.  Thanks for any help understanding this.
Carole - Colorado Springs

Activating his sometimes-reliable AcuType system, Jim attempts this:
There are actually two parts to this. Attaching an AcuFeed foot does give you the dual feed (aka even feed, aka walking foot) effect, exactly the same as if you attached an even feed/walking foot to the machine. However if you touch the Dual Feed button (page 29, item 4) you tell the machine to engage the system that allows the top and bottom fabrics to feed at different rates depending on the setting of the Dual Feed Balancing dial (page 31). Touching that button also disables decorative stitches that have a reverse cycle in them, because they may not stitch correctly when dual feeding is active.



Re: Hatch Embroidery Software

Meryl Margolies
 

Thanks for that info. I've been hesitant.

What's your take on the product vs. MBX 5.0?


With a take that usually leans toward the absurd, Jim says:

It's somewhat like driving two different brands of car. They both have the same things, but they may be in slightly different places. Comparing the two head to head:


1. Have more than one brand of embroidery machine? Advantage: Hatch


2. Want ALL the features you can get in embroidery software? Advantage: MBX V5 


3. Want to start small without spending a lot, then add as you can? Advantage: Hatch


4. Want wireless connectivity with your MC15000? Advantage: MBX V5


5. Have MBX 4.x and want all the same features in an upgrade? Advantage: MBX V5


6. Need graphics software along with digitizing? Advantage: MBX V5, which includes Corel DRAW


Note that with BOTH of these programs you cannot install on as many computers as you wish. We've been told that MBX V5 allows two installations and I'm guessing that Hatch will also. This covers the case where you want to use the program on a desktop and a laptop, or a single reinstallation after a hardware failure. In cases where things aren't working right the time-honored solution has been to uninstall and reinstall, but that's not a good strategy with these products. I'm sure that Wilcom will provide a means for legitimate owners to reinstall in reasonable cases, but that will require a lot more effort than just moving a dongle from one computer to another.


Also be advised that the trial versions of both products "phone home" to authenticate and advise of time remaining. Purchased and installed products will also check for updates online. I have verified that Hatch will still function without an Internet connection, but at least one member using the trial version of V5 has had issues with crashing when an update connection cannot be established.


Re: Bobbin winding /needle threader

JOLLYNE TOSTE <jtoste@...>
 

Scroll the past few emails he just answered!

Sent from my iPad

On Feb 19, 2016, at 5:47 AM, JoAnn Novak vinjosew@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

  I missed Jim's answer.  Where can I find this information??
  JoAnn
Life's biggest decision is what you do with Jesus.


 

I have had off/on success with bobbin winding and the needle threader.  Thanks to all have commented on both these issues (and to Jim), I have successfully accomplished both these tasks.  I now use the LOCK key on my 12K to engage the needle threader.  I have also found that Klasse needles are longer than Janome, Organ and Schmetz.  Now I know that the needle threader fits perfectly in the needle hole for needles other than Klasse.  In the past I have not had good results winding the bobbin (on my 6600, JEM and 12K), tension was soft, didn't wind evenly.  I now use the method recommended by Jim and have had perfectly wound bobbins, thank you very much.  This last time, since my bobbin thread was a different color than top thread, I did not remove the top spool--just used a side thread holder and threaded through the bobbin 'slits' and had perfect results.  Thank you so much to all have contributed to this forum.

Carole - Colorado Springs



Re: We interrupt your normal list reading to tell you ...

Meryl Margolies
 

It seems that you can choose your machine when you customize Hatch, and will be able to transfer designs to the machine. I have the 12000. so I use a cable. The Hatch manual (http://www.embroideryhelp.net/hatch10/en/setup) says you can do this. I wish I were independently wealthy and could upgrade MBX and get Hatch

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