Date   

The Spam: Re: As I Promised

Cheryl Paul
 

Hi Jim,

I clicked on this link and was sent to some "Casino" site - I think. Once I realized it wasn't related to sewing I got out. Will this cause me any problem? I'm sure others may be wondering too, if we have compromised our computers by looking.

Thanks for any wisdom that you can shed of this for us.

Cheryl - Saskatoon Canada

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, Jim Stutsman <jim@...> wrote:

I have placed that member on moderation to prevent any more spam messages, and have deleted the post. Email continues to be a huge target for spammers, and if it becomes a problem for the list I will put the entire list on moderation.

Jim

Jim Stutsman
jim@...
http://www.onlinesewing.com



On Feb 9, 2012, at 2:45 PM, Lee Beasley wrote:

Somebody's e-mail has been hacked. I'm sure the person didn't send it intentionally. When you see a suspicious subject line, it's always best to bypass it, and, whatever you do, don't click on the link.


Lee B.

I don't know you and I don't know what you were trying to send, but I don't appreciate being sent to this link that only showed how to purchase VIAGRA.



Bindings

Sherry Martin
 

I am always experimenting with trying to sew bindings on without needing to stitch by hand on the back. But I've always went back to that method because nothing else looked good enough for me.

I've tried sewing the binding on from the front, then stitching in the ditch on the front to the back, but I can never get all of the binding on the back stitched thru and it never looked even.

I even tried some kind of special tool thing. It was a plastic thing you ran the quilt thru (can't think of the name). Couldn't get it to work.

I've tried sewing the binding on from the back and turning to the front and top stitching but it was still never perfect especially in the corners.

Well, I just finished a quilt and thought I would try again. I stitched the binding on from the back and then turned it to the front. Then I used the stitch in the ditch foot on the acu feed and moved the needle to the right a little. So I essentially used the ditch stitch foot as a top stitch foot. It turned out perfectly. I think being able to use the acu feed foot along with the ditch stitch foot made a big difference. Even the corners are perfect.

I was thinking about buying the quilt binder set, but was worried about the double fold fabric problem. If you use double fold fabric doesn't that mean that where the fabric is turned under you actually have 4 folds? And if you use only single fabric then for the outside part of the binding you don't have the extra layers? Anyway I liked the stitch in ditch foot so much that I decided not to buy the quilt binder set....yet. We'll see how the next project goes.


Re: Extra large table

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

As Vicki said, the table is adjustable, so there is no problem with anything catching. In general the more surface you have under the hoop, the more stable it will be, so I'd go with the table.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "lysiaau" <n.schuster@...> wrote:

Is it more stable for the hoops to have the extra large table or
accessory box on the machine while embroidering? I think I read a
message about the hoops catching but I cant remember. I learn so much from reading the messages. Thank you
Lysia


Re: Email and other nightmares

Lee Beasley <slpslee@...>
 

Great point. ESPECIALLY if it's from your bank. They never send links in e-mails, but spoofers do. 

Sent from my iPad


To be safe, NEVER click a link in an email, 


Re: Extra large table

stitchnpatch
 

Lysia - I don't know if it makes the hoops more stable having the big table on but that is how I have mine set up permanently along with the embroidery module and I love the arrangement. It saves me having to find somewhere to store the table and its ready for any project I'm doing. I would think that if the hoops were catching on the table then that would be to do with the height of the table which can be adjusted to fit the machine.

Vicki


Re: thread holder

Anne <csarina43@...>
 

I have the thread holder from my 11000 on my 12000 just undo the screws slightly, and slip over the slots as you do on the 11000 it fits perfectly, tighten the scres enough to hold the stand in place.

Actually my 12000 is at this momrnt in time on its way back to Janome UK. It started doing weird things at the weekend.......watch this space.


Re: Email and other nightmares

Pinguin
 



Op 10-02-12 04:24, Jim_Stutsman schreef:
To be safe, NEVER click a link in an email, whether it seems to be from your sister or your bank.

Hello,

if you wonder about a link in an email, just move your mouse over it (do NOT click) and at the bottom of the screen you see the real address it is linking you to, often different than the link in the mail. That should let the alarmbells go off!

Gerda


Re: thread holder

Donna Morton
 

No sure about the US but the 12000 5 spool thread stand here in Canada is half the price of the one for the 11000. 
 
Donna M
Canada
 

Sent: Thursday, February 09, 2012 6:52 PM
Subject: [janome12000] Re: thread holder
 
 

Well, maybe. Getting longer screws is easy enough. Just hit Home Depot or Lowes in the metric screw section and match what you have. I don't have an 11000 to check, so I don't know whether the spacing on the thread stand is the same as the 12000. That's important. As for the screws that are there, they are intended for the 12000 thread stand and go into the machine "skeleton". The trick is to have screws that are long enough to hold the stand, but not so long that they go too far and snag wiring or other parts. After what you've spent to get the machine, I'm not sure it's worth risking messing up the machine for the $100 or so cost of the thread stand.

--- In mailto:janome12000%40yahoogroups.com, "thistlebug" wrote:
>
> Jim,
>
> Watch out, I am thinking again.
> Is this possible? When looking at
> the back of the 12000 I spotted
> two screws near the top about 5"
> in from the wheel end under the
> handle. Do you think it would be
> possible to get two longer screws
> and screw the 11000 thread holder
> onto the back of the machine? I
> don't know what those screws are
> screwed into, but thought it was
> worth a try. What do you think?
> This would save us from purchasing
> another thread holder. Thanks,
> Peg in cool FL
>


Extra large table

lysiaau <n.schuster@...>
 

Is it more stable for the hoops to have the extra large table or
accessory box on the machine while embroidering? I think I read a
message about the hoops catching but I cant remember. I learn so much from reading the messages. Thank you
Lysia


Email and other nightmares

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

If you've been in any Yahoo group for more than a couple months, you've seen it before. A perfectly wonderful group member has a message posted under his or her member ID, pitching something no one in the group would ever dream of buying, or worse. It's embarrassing to the member, annoying to the group, and it happens again and again. Most victims believe their email has been "hacked". In truth, they most likely hacked themselves by opening an email from a spam robot, or visiting a website that has been compromised and altered to spread code to create more spam robots.

You cannot buy a Windows computer that does not come with at least minimal antivirus protection, but none of the "free with your computer" antivirus programs work for very long without spending money to buy a subscription to update the virus definitions used to detect the bad guys. There are free options available, and generally you are better off uninstalling all the "free trial" software from your new computer and installing something else. Microsoft has a decent free offering called Microsoft Security Essentials. Google that and you'll find a download.

Once you have your antivirus software in place, make sure you don't volunteer to get infected. This happens when you get an email from a friend, or an address you recognize, with a message that says something like "You've got to see this!". Click the included link and wind up going to a website you wish you hadn't gone too. If the site has malicious scripting in it, you could wind up with something you REALLY wish you hadn't gotten. Bad guys are good at impersonating friends, and one of the first things malware does is to sweep through your address book collecting names and email addresses. To be safe, NEVER click a link in an email, whether it seems to be from your sister or your bank.

If, in spite of your best efforts, your email gets compromised, you should IMMEDIATELY change the password to that email and EVERY other site where that password is used. It's a bad idea to use the same password everywhere for exactly this reason, and the bad guys know that most people do that. If the compromised email account is used with Yahoo or other mailing lists, unsubscribe it. You can resubscribe with the new address that you should get. Consider using a Gmail address, as Google will scan for known bad links in your emails before you get them.

I have put the member who was victimized on moderation, so I can review any post claiming to be from that account before making it live. It's supremely annoying to get one of these emails in your list mail, but please don't take it out on the alleged sender. The next one could be coming from YOUR account! As the Sarge used to say on Hill Street Blues (Oh dear lord I'm old if I remember that!), "Let's be careful out there!"


Re: thread holder

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

Well, maybe. Getting longer screws is easy enough. Just hit Home Depot or Lowes in the metric screw section and match what you have. I don't have an 11000 to check, so I don't know whether the spacing on the thread stand is the same as the 12000. That's important. As for the screws that are there, they are intended for the 12000 thread stand and go into the machine "skeleton". The trick is to have screws that are long enough to hold the stand, but not so long that they go too far and snag wiring or other parts. After what you've spent to get the machine, I'm not sure it's worth risking messing up the machine for the $100 or so cost of the thread stand.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "thistlebug" <pegijane39@...> wrote:

Jim,

Watch out, I am thinking again.
Is this possible? When looking at
the back of the 12000 I spotted
two screws near the top about 5"
in from the wheel end under the
handle. Do you think it would be
possible to get two longer screws
and screw the 11000 thread holder
onto the back of the machine? I
don't know what those screws are
screwed into, but thought it was
worth a try. What do you think?
This would save us from purchasing
another thread holder. Thanks,
Peg in cool FL


thread holder

thistlebug <pegijane39@...>
 

Jim,

Watch out, I am thinking again.
Is this possible? When looking at
the back of the 12000 I spotted
two screws near the top about 5"
in from the wheel end under the
handle. Do you think it would be
possible to get two longer screws
and screw the 11000 thread holder
onto the back of the machine? I
don't know what those screws are
screwed into, but thought it was
worth a try. What do you think?
This would save us from purchasing
another thread holder. Thanks,
Peg in cool FL


thread holder

thistlebug <pegijane39@...>
 

Jim,

Watch out, I am thinking again.
Is this possible? When looking at
the back of the 12000 I spotted
two screws near the top about 5"
in from the wheel end under the
handle. Do you think it would be
possible to get two longer screws
and screw the 11000 thread holder
onto the back of the machine? I
don't know what those screws are
screwed into, but thought it was
worth a try. What do you think?
This would save us from purchasing
another thread holder. Thanks,
Peg in cool FL


Re: My Janome 12000

vicki chrobak
 

That is a phenomenal system Maggie. Thank you very much for explaining. Although I've spent time in the far east & used transformers I never went to UK or Europe & I do like education in whatever form. And I just thought everyone used/needed surge protectors.

--
Vicki Jo

Hi Vicki, I wasn't trying to educate you sweetheart but stop Anne
spending her hard to gather savings. We have a higher voltage rating
here in Gt Britain and Europe, 230 volta with a 10% leeway up or down.
We also have a system of transformers and invertors en route to the
point of use, i,e, the consumer. Before any current can be drawn by a
cosumer it has to pass through a 'mains consumer board' which has a 'max
load fuse' inserted in such a way any attempt to change that mains max
load fuse will be seen. We have fused circuits, normally in 2 storey
house, 2 lighting circuits, one for each floor, 2 socket circuits, also
one for each floor, a cooker circuit with an isolater switch plus its
own fuse and the circuit fuse. If you do as we did, extend your home it
has to have new circuits laid from the mains board and have seperate
circuits for lighting and sockets. All appliances must have fused
power plugs, rated at the highest amperage level for that appliance,
no higher. If a fuse is blown in a plug socket it switches off the
whole of that circuit by tripping its circuit breaker on the the mains
fuse board. In the unlikely event the draw on a circuit exceeds the
maximum load of 13 amps then the circuit breaker will cut the power to
that circuit via the trip switch. The consumer board and each circuit
is ground earthed, usually to a mains water pipe as it enters the house
as that passes directly into the soil outside the building. The mains
power line is also ground earthed before entering the meter, and then
the consumer board, so the whole system is designed on the belt and
bracers principle. So I suppose in a way it does operate a little like a
power surge protector, but our Computers, electronic micro processor
goods are more likely to be damaged by static than power surges over
here.



Since the arrival of central heating, man made fibres used in clothing
and carpets, we ourselves generate an enormous amount of static. I
have wood floors, real wool rugs, wear rubber soled house shoes and
always ground myself by touching the metal housing of my PC before
turning it on. I keep humidifiers topped up to prevent the air getting
dry enough to create static, and remove plugs from sockets when an
item isnt being used, never leave any appliances on standby, (TV or PC
on standby consumes more electricity then when being used) the only
appliances never turned off are the freezer,refrigerator, and gas
boiler, they have an extremely low power draw.

maggie cooper.


Re: Stupendous Stitching projects

vicki chrobak
 

Thank you Barbara. I had a ball with both versions of my project. I took the class specifically for inspiration & it did not fail me. The instructor's only rule was "There are no rules" --right up my alley & I used it to the hilt. Almost didn't know when to quit beading. So yes, I do recommend it. I also learned a new way to finish my fm wallhangings. What I liked best was getting a totally new perspective & a new way to use my machine & hand needlework. On my first project I felted fabric from rayon thread scraps & silk scraps for the background in lieu of recommended batik fabric. Go for it, you won't be sorry.

--
Vicki Jo

What I liked best was getting a totally new perspective
I like your project! I hadn't thought the stupendious stitching was a class I wanted to buy, as I could "do it myself" ,but now...maybe a class for inspiration might be nice. Do you recommend it, and what did you like best about it? I just bought the craftsy "Jean-ious: Reverse engineer" class, so can buy another course this week for $25.

Is anyone doing the free quilting block of the month? I've taught quilting for years, but am still doing it. I ALWAYS learn something from a teacher, so love to take classes, as well as teaching them. The blocks are fun so far. Barbara Jean


Re: As I Promised

Jim Stutsman <jim@...>
 

I have placed that member on moderation to prevent any more spam messages, and have deleted the post. Email continues to be a huge target for spammers, and if it becomes a problem for the list I will put the entire list on moderation.

Jim

On Feb 9, 2012, at 2:45 PM, Lee Beasley wrote:

 

Somebody's e-mail has been hacked. I'm sure the person didn't send it intentionally. When you see a suspicious subject line, it's always best to bypass it, and, whatever you do, don't click on the link.


Lee B.

I don’t know you and I don’t know what you were trying to send, but I don’t appreciate being sent to this link that only showed how to purchase VIAGRA.




Re: Stupendous Stitching projects

Lee Beasley <slpslee@...>
 

I am. I get a big kick out of the Craftsy classes, and who can resist free? I bought the Stupendous Stitching class too, but haven't started it yet. It does sound like fun, though.

Lee B.

Sent from my iPad


Is anyone doing the free quilting block of the month? 


Re: Stupendous Stitching projects

Anna C Simon <rbs11739@...>
 

Barbara,
 
I bought the class, and you are right it is good for the ideas that you can learn. I enjoyed it very much.I will need to put apicture of mine in the photo's.
I and watching the block of the month class have not done the blocks yet.
They both are good teachers. 
 
 
 
 
Ann Simon
Our Etsy store

-------Original Message-------
 
From: gbmko
Date: 2/9/2012 4:00:29 PM
Subject: [janome12000] Re: Stupendous Stitching projects
 
 

I like your project! I hadn't thought the stupendious stitching was a class I wanted to buy, as I could "do it myself" ,but now...maybe a class for inspiration might be nice. Do you recommend it, and what did you like best about it? I just bought the craftsy "Jean-ious: Reverse engineer" class, so can buy another course this week for $25.

Is anyone doing the free quilting block of the month? I've taught quilting for years, but am still doing it. I ALWAYS learn something from a teacher, so love to take classes, as well as teaching them. The blocks are fun so far. Barbara Jean

--- In janome12000@..., "Vicki" wrote:
>
> I just uploaded pics of my 2 Stupendous Stitching projects in Vicki Jo's Sewing Room.
> Vicki Jo
>

 


Re: My Janome 12000

maggie cooper
 

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, vicki chrobak <tulsajo1@...> wrote:

Thank you Maggie for educating me. The fused power plugs, are they like
surge protectors?

--
Vicki Jo

Hi Vicki, I wasn't trying to educate you sweetheart but stop Anne spending her hard to gather savings. We have a higher voltage rating here in Gt Britain and Europe, 230 volta with a 10% leeway up or down. We also have a system of transformers and invertors en route to the point of use, i,e, the consumer. Before any current can be drawn by a cosumer it has to pass through a 'mains consumer board' which has a 'max load fuse' inserted in such a way any attempt to change that mains max load fuse will be seen. We have fused circuits, normally in 2 storey house, 2 lighting circuits, one for each floor, 2 socket circuits, also one for each floor, a cooker circuit with an isolater switch plus its own fuse and the circuit fuse. If you do as we did, extend your home it has to have new circuits laid from the mains board and have seperate circuits for lighting and sockets. All appliances must have fused power plugs, rated at the highest amperage level for that appliance, no higher. If a fuse is blown in a plug socket it switches off the whole of that circuit by tripping its circuit breaker on the the mains fuse board. In the unlikely event the draw on a circuit exceeds the maximum load of 13 amps then the circuit breaker will cut the power to that circuit via the trip switch. The consumer board and each circuit is ground earthed, usually to a mains water pipe as it enters the house as that passes directly into the soil outside the building. The mains power line is also ground earthed before entering the meter, and then the consumer board, so the whole system is designed on the belt and bracers principle. So I suppose in a way it does operate a little like a power surge protector, but our Computers, electronic micro processor goods are more likely to be damaged by static than power surges over here.

Since the arrival of central heating, man made fibres used in clothing and carpets, we ourselves generate an enormous amount of static. I have wood floors, real wool rugs, wear rubber soled house shoes and always ground myself by touching the metal housing of my PC before turning it on. I keep humidifiers topped up to prevent the air getting dry enough to create static, and remove plugs from sockets when an item isnt being used, never leave any appliances on standby, (TV or PC on standby consumes more electricity then when being used) the only appliances never turned off are the freezer,refrigerator, and gas boiler, they have an extremely low power draw.
maggie cooper.


Re: Stupendous Stitching projects

gbmko
 

I like your project! I hadn't thought the stupendious stitching was a class I wanted to buy, as I could "do it myself" ,but now...maybe a class for inspiration might be nice. Do you recommend it, and what did you like best about it? I just bought the craftsy "Jean-ious: Reverse engineer" class, so can buy another course this week for $25.

Is anyone doing the free quilting block of the month? I've taught quilting for years, but am still doing it. I ALWAYS learn something from a teacher, so love to take classes, as well as teaching them. The blocks are fun so far. Barbara Jean

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Vicki" <tulsajo1@...> wrote:

I just uploaded pics of my 2 Stupendous Stitching projects in Vicki Jo's Sewing Room.
Vicki Jo