Date   

Re: Instruction book

Sherry Martin
 

Mine did the same thing. I printed out the version Jim provided for us (yes all those pages) on this site, and put it in a 3-ring binder. Everytime I tried to put the original one back together it got worse. Thinking I might try to take it to an office supply store sometime and see if they have a spiral machine that can take it apart and put it back together. I used to use one when I volunteered at my kid's school, but it would have to be the same kind as Janome used.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, vicki chrobak <tulsajo1@...> wrote:

I noticed the same thing the other day Anne.
On another list I'm on, someone did a pictorial comparison between
machine needle brands. I was surprised at the difference. Of course I
can't find the pics now:-(

--
Vicki Jo

Have any of you had a problem with the spine on the instruaction book for the 12000? yesterday I noticed that half the pages in the book were not on the spine. OH tried to sort it but as quick as he got the bottom on the spine, the top of the pages came off.

I sorted it last night by removing the pages and putting them in clear document sleeves in a hard cover folder. It takes less than a pack of the clear document sleeves, the pages stay clean and do not get tatty through use.......

I have the folder stored in the side of my sewing machine table so I can reach it easily.

By the bye, glad someone else has found a problem using the schemtz needles. I have not had thread breaks with them but have had a problem using the needle threader, so its not just me.


Re: Instruction book

vicki chrobak
 

I noticed the same thing the other day Anne.
On another list I'm on, someone did a pictorial comparison between machine needle brands. I was surprised at the difference. Of course I can't find the pics now:-(

--
Vicki Jo

Have any of you had a problem with the spine on the instruaction book for the 12000? yesterday I noticed that half the pages in the book were not on the spine. OH tried to sort it but as quick as he got the bottom on the spine, the top of the pages came off.

I sorted it last night by removing the pages and putting them in clear document sleeves in a hard cover folder. It takes less than a pack of the clear document sleeves, the pages stay clean and do not get tatty through use.......

I have the folder stored in the side of my sewing machine table so I can reach it easily.

By the bye, glad someone else has found a problem using the schemtz needles. I have not had thread breaks with them but have had a problem using the needle threader, so its not just me.


Re: Calibrate Hoops and Free Arm Hoop

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

Oh my aching hoops! Here's what happens. The machine has sensors that tell it when it's at the far end of each movement - left/right or front/back. When you turn it on it moves the hoop holding bracket until the sensor says it's at the "home" position in both directions. When you open a design for a specific hoop, it knows to move it a certain number of steps in each direction to get to the center of the hoop. HOWEVER - due to many factors that might not be the EXACT center. In calibrating, you cause the machine to memorize an adjustment factor for each hoop. Every time a design is opened, the machine will move to where the center of that particular hoop should be, plus or minus the adjustment factor for that hoop. Because this factor is in the memory of the machine, you don't need to calibrate again UNLESS a) the machine is serviced and the base is removed/replaced - no technician I know can guarantee getting it back in the same exact position within a tenth of a millimeter OR b) you use the "Reset all to defaults" option in the SET screen, which puts all the memorized adjustments back to 0.

Note that this DOES NOT mean that the machine recognizes what hoop is attached, only that it assumes that the hoop stored in the design itself is the one on the machine. So if you use the GR hoop for a FA7 design AND do not change the hoop in the EDIT screen, it will use the calibration for hoop GR instead of FA7. I hoop, er hope, this clarifies how the process works. It's not nearly as complex as all these posts would have you believe!

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Julie" <jjems@...> wrote:

Jim - I don't want to beat this to death either but if you only have to
calibrate one time, then it must mean that the machine is going to recognize
the particular hoop that you did the calibration for - and if I put on the
free arm hoop and change the calibration for the center of that hoop, then
the calibration gets memorized for THAT particular hoop.



With the No, no, no, no only calibrate one time - ----------- calibrate the
3 regular hoops once and the free arm once - after that nothing else will
have to be done? All will be memorized for each hoop?



Julie


Re: Instruction book

Vikki Youngmeyer
 

My instruction book for the 12000 came spiral bound and is still holding together with no problem!  I just need more time to sew – have dog show paperwork, work, health issues with my hubby and taxes which is cutting into my sewing time.

 

I finished my embroidered appliquéd bird project. Just need to put borders on it, quilt and bind it. Thank goodness it’s small. I’ll probably use the 12000 to quilt it as opposed to racking up the mid-arm!

 

Vikki

Houston, TX


Re: Instruction book

Judy Blomgren <judy_blomgren@...>
 

I have had the same problem with bound instruction books and to re do them, I have taken them to a printing place to have them spirel bound, that way they can lay flat and not flop shut or break the spine. 
 
Judy B.


Re: Instruction book

grandma
 

I have the back of the book come apart and put it back together. I am a little cautious now when I use it and have been checking it as I don't want to rip anything.

Good suggestion.


Instruction book

Anne <csarina43@...>
 

Have any of you had a problem with the spine on the instruaction book for the 12000? yesterday I noticed that half the pages in the book were not on the spine. OH tried to sort it but as quick as he got the bottom on the spine, the top of the pages came off.

I sorted it last night by removing the pages and putting them in clear document sleeves in a hard cover folder. It takes less than a pack of the clear document sleeves, the pages stay clean and do not get tatty through use.......

I have the folder stored in the side of my sewing machine table so I can reach it easily.

By the bye, glad someone else has found a problem using the schemtz needles. I have not had thread breaks with them but have had a problem using the needle threader, so its not just me.


Re: Calibrate Hoops and Free Arm Hoop

Julie
 

Jim – I don’t want to beat this to death either but if you only have to calibrate one time, then it must mean that the machine is going to recognize the particular hoop that you did the calibration for – and if I put on the free arm hoop and change the calibration for the center of that hoop, then the calibration gets memorized for THAT particular hoop. 

 

With the No, no, no, no only calibrate one time – -----------  calibrate the 3 regular hoops once and the  free arm once – after that nothing else will have to be done?  All will be memorized for each hoop?

 

Julie

 

1. NO, NO, NO! You calibrate your machine ONCE. It is only necessary to calibrate again if your machine is serviced, or you use the "Reset all to defaults" option in the SET screen.

3. We initially believed that calibrating one hoop would do for all of them, because in theory all hoops have the same center. What we found is that the free arm hoop center was slightly off when all the rest were perfect. Calibrating it separately solved that. It may, or may not, be different from the others. Check and calibrate if necessary - once!



Re: Janome Needles

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

Sounds like a good habit to teach.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Donna Morton" <demorton@...> wrote:

I have been using the lock out key. I use it when I swap out needle plates, for changing presser feet and for threading the needle. The needle threader in embroidery mode does not even come close to working with the foot in its highest position. When I get to the needle, I lower the foot with the presser foot button so the needle threader will work. I decided to get in the habit that I want my students to get into using in class.

Donna M
Canada


Janome vs Schmetz needles

Sherry Martin
 

After the discussion here about Janome and Schmetz needles, I decided to use a Schmetz needle today to free motion quilt using stippling which I do fairly often.

1st I also couldn't get the auto threader to work. It worked once with me kind of pushing on the needle to get the hook to go thru, and then I couldn't get it thru at all after that.

2nd I had about 4 thread breaks in a fairly short time. It almost seemed like the needle is very slightly longer than the Janome needles and wasn't coming out of the fabric completely when I hit a particularly thick spot in the fabric and it would get kind of stuck. I was using a size 11 quilting needle. Possibly raising the free motion height would have helped. But instead I went back to my old trusty Janome blue tip needle and the thread never broke again.


Re: Janome Needles

Donna Morton
 

I have been using the lock out key.  I use it when I swap out needle plates, for changing presser feet and for threading the needle.  The needle threader in embroidery mode does not even come close to working with the foot in its highest position.  When I get to the needle, I lower the foot with the presser foot button so the needle threader will work.  I decided to get in the habit that I want my students to get into using in class.
 
Donna M
Canada

Sent: Saturday, February 04, 2012 1:16 AM
Subject: [janome12000] Re: Janome Needles
 
 

I always thread my machine with the presser foot up until I get the thread down as far as the needle then I drop the presser foot to use the needle threader as I find it makes it easier to use. Occasionally I find that the needle threader wont connect properly with the needle so I drop the needle and bring it back up using the needle up/down button on the front of the machine and that seems to line it up properly. At the moment I am only using Janome/Organ needles so don't know what would happen with Schmetz needles.

I've just looked at the manual and it says to press the lockout key before starting which will drop the presser foot and open the tensions disks (page 13) - I have to admit that I keep forgetting to use the lockout key - do other people use it?

Vicki


Re: Janome Needles

vicki chrobak
 

Jim-You & Diane & all other list members are so appreciated here. I am learning so much.

--
Vicki Jo

Well everyone is right, and I'm mostly wrong. What the book tells you is
to raise the needle and press the LOCK OUT button. We've never had that
before, and unlike any machine that Janome has ever made, it lowers the
foot AND opens the tension discs. It also prevents you from
accidentally hitting the START/STOP button while threading (Don't ask!).
The video does show pressing the LOCK OUT button "for safety". Yes, it
may be for safety, but it also opens the tension discs, which is a
critical component of threading.



If you, like us, don't use the LOCK OUT button, then you should still
raise the foot for threading, at least until you get to the needle. That
second whirring sound you hear when the foot goes up is the tension
motor opening the discs.


Re: New - Magic Bobbin Washers

Grace Lubold <glubold@...>
 

OOPS    message correction:    When I use the bobbin washers,  I have NO problems with bobbin “jumping”, thread snarles in the bobbin case,  or losing the thread end after using the cutter.    These things happened frequently with the very fine thread I like to use in the bobbin  (usually Bottom Line).    grace


Re: Janome Needles

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

Well everyone is right, and I'm mostly wrong. What the book tells you is to raise the needle and press the LOCK OUT button. We've never had that before, and unlike any machine that Janome has ever made, it lowers the foot AND opens the tension discs. It also prevents you from accidentally hitting the START/STOP button while threading (Don't ask!). The video does show pressing the LOCK OUT button "for safety". Yes, it may be for safety, but it also opens the tension discs, which is a critical component of threading.

If you, like us, don't use the LOCK OUT button, then you should still raise the foot for threading, at least until you get to the needle. That second whirring sound you hear when the foot goes up is the tension motor opening the discs.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, Judy Ziegler <judyjanome@...> wrote:

thank you jim for answering so quickly.  I just watched the video regarding threading and although not mentioned in the video I paid close attention to the pressure foot and it was definately down.  I believe the book mentions to have it down.  I believe you but this could be confusing for many of us.  Guess what I found today.  All my copies of the Eleven Heaven, I believe that was what it was called.  Judy


Re: Janome Needles

stitchnpatch
 

I always thread my machine with the presser foot up until I get the thread down as far as the needle then I drop the presser foot to use the needle threader as I find it makes it easier to use. Occasionally I find that the needle threader wont connect properly with the needle so I drop the needle and bring it back up using the needle up/down button on the front of the machine and that seems to line it up properly. At the moment I am only using Janome/Organ needles so don't know what would happen with Schmetz needles.

I've just looked at the manual and it says to press the lockout key before starting which will drop the presser foot and open the tensions disks (page 13) - I have to admit that I keep forgetting to use the lockout key - do other people use it?

Vicki


Re: Janome Needles

Judy Ziegler <judyjanome@...>
 

thank you jim for answering so quickly.  I just watched the video regarding threading and although not mentioned in the video I paid close attention to the pressure foot and it was definately down.  I believe the book mentions to have it down.  I believe you but this could be confusing for many of us.  Guess what I found today.  All my copies of the Eleven Heaven, I believe that was what it was called.  Judy

From: Jim_Stutsman
To: janome12000@...
Sent: Friday, February 3, 2012 11:28 PM
Subject: [janome12000] Re: Janome Needles

 
The presser foot must be UP when threading, in order to open the tension discs. Once you get to the needle, you can put the foot down for threading the needle, although this is an optional step. It helps for some, but it is not mandatory.

--- In janome12000@..., Judy wrote:
>
> I am slightly confused about the comment about threading the machine with the foot up and then lower the foot when threading. I am sure I read in the manual the pressure foot should be down to go thru the tension discs. It did seem reversed from what I am used to, however, many things do with this machine. Do love it though. Judy
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>




Re: Janome Needles

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

The presser foot must be UP when threading, in order to open the tension discs. Once you get to the needle, you can put the foot down for threading the needle, although this is an optional step. It helps for some, but it is not mandatory.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, Judy <judyjanome@...> wrote:

I am slightly confused about the comment about threading the machine with the foot up and then lower the foot when threading. I am sure I read in the manual the pressure foot should be down to go thru the tension discs. It did seem reversed from what I am used to, however, many things do with this machine. Do love it though. Judy

Sent from my iPhone


Re: calibrate hoops but needle goes to the left?

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

When you go into embroidery mode, the needle automatically moves to the leftmost position. There is a hole in the center of the template. You move the hoop, using the arrows on the set screen, if necessary so the needle passes through that hole. That's all there is to it. It is only necessary for the needle to be able to pass through the hole in the template. It does not need to be centered in the hole.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "joylaytor" <joylaytor@...> wrote:

I don't want to beat this topic to death, but I would like to clarify the answer below. When calibrating the hoops you DO want the needle to go into the hole of the template and if it doesn't then you move the HOOP using the arrow icons. (It is confusing to some because the needle uses the left hole on the needle plate)
Joy

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Jim_Stutsman" <jim@> wrote:

All embroidery is done from the left needle position, and the calibration function is only available in embroidery mode. Don't try to change the needle position for calibration. It will be correct when you open the function.


Re: Janome Needles

Judy <judyjanome@...>
 

I am slightly confused about the comment about threading the machine with the foot up and then lower the foot when threading. I am sure I read in the manual the pressure foot should be down to go thru the tension discs. It did seem reversed from what I am used to, however, many things do with this machine. Do love it though. Judy

Sent from my iPhone


Re: Calibrate Hoops and Free Arm Hoop

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

1. NO, NO, NO! You calibrate your machine ONCE. It is only necessary to calibrate again if your machine is serviced, or you use the "Reset all to defaults" option in the SET screen.

2. Lay the free arm hoop on a flat surface (table, countertop) with the attaching knob extending off the edge. The hoop should be laying flat, or very close to flat. Ours is lifted up about 3/8" at the hoop end when the rest of it is flat. We can also look down the edge of the hoop and see an obvious bend in it.

3. We initially believed that calibrating one hoop would do for all of them, because in theory all hoops have the same center. What we found is that the free arm hoop center was slightly off when all the rest were perfect. Calibrating it separately solved that. It may, or may not, be different from the others. Check and calibrate if necessary - once!

Hope this helps!

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Julie" <jjems@...> wrote:

Jim - I have been reading prior posts on this subject and not sure about some answers.

1. you are saying that each hoop will have to be calibrated for THAT particular hoop each time you change hoops? I hope you are not saying that. Two of my hoops were exactly the same. One was a little off from the middle but still went through the hole, and the free arm was pretty far off. For the one hoop (largest one) that was not exactly in the middle, will I have to calibrate it separately when I use it and then recalibrate for the others?

2. How can you tell if the free arm hoop is warped? On mine the left side is lower than the right if you get down and look at how far it is from the base of the machine. Is that what it means by being warped?

3. The free arm will always have to be calibrated because it's going to be different from the others?

Thanks for making this all clear for me. I do appreciate your information on how to calibrate. Did not know that existed.

Julie