Date   

Re: Cloth Setter

Helen Brown
 

I will wait until they have a cloth setter before I buy a 12000. I use the 11000 cloth setter for all that I do.

Sent from my iPhone

On Jan 29, 2012, at 10:04 AM, "Marsha Lemmons" <hobbied1@...> wrote:

 

I agree, Nettie!  I went to the Janome site & filled out a request for one.  I can use the templates & crosshairs for most things but for very precise placement of the fabric on a multi-part large format picture design, nothing beats the clothsetter.  I don't know if I would have bought this machine if I had known they weren't going to have one.  So, my fingers are crossed that eventually they'll do one. 
 
Marsha


Re: Bobbin cover

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

Also the covers for the 6500, 6600, 7700, and 11000.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, vicki chrobak <tulsajo1@...> wrote:

The cover for the 6300P fits the 12000.

--
Vicki Jo


Re: Bobbin cover

theagedpage@...
 

It does fit - last week I bought one at my dealer and it was only $3. You would have thought for $3 Janome would have included one on each plate just so customers would be happy...it was annoying having to change it with each plate.
Linda Lee


---- Anne <csarina43@gmail.com> wrote:
Does anyone know if the bobbin case cover for the 11000 also fits the 12000? Several times I have taken off the needle plate and then realised I have left the cover on. Solution get another bobbin cover. I have seen bobbin covers on E bay so I guess you can get them.


Re: Bobbin cover

vicki chrobak
 

The cover for the 6300P fits the 12000.

--
Vicki Jo


Re: Bobbin cover

Jo Lynch <jolynch12@...>
 

Yes Anne it does, but I just bought a spare one from my Janome dealer
Jo
 
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Anne
Sent: Monday, January 30, 2012 7:25 AM
Subject: [janome12000] Bobbin cover

 

Does anyone know if the bobbin case cover for the 11000 also fits the 12000? Several times I have taken off the needle plate and then realised I have left the cover on. Solution get another bobbin cover. I have seen bobbin covers on E bay so I guess you can get them.


Re: Bobbin cover

Sherry Martin
 

It seems to be something a lot of people are doing. In fact in the class I took on Sat. one person brought the straight stitch needle plate only because we were doing embroidery and forgot to take the cover off of the other needle plate.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Anne" <csarina43@...> wrote:

Does anyone know if the bobbin case cover for the 11000 also fits the 12000? Several times I have taken off the needle plate and then realised I have left the cover on. Solution get another bobbin cover. I have seen bobbin covers on E bay so I guess you can get them.


Bobbin cover

Anne <csarina43@...>
 

Does anyone know if the bobbin case cover for the 11000 also fits the 12000? Several times I have taken off the needle plate and then realised I have left the cover on. Solution get another bobbin cover. I have seen bobbin covers on E bay so I guess you can get them.


Re: Cloth Setter

Marsha
 

I agree, Nettie!  I went to the Janome site & filled out a request for one.  I can use the templates & crosshairs for most things but for very precise placement of the fabric on a multi-part large format picture design, nothing beats the clothsetter.  I don't know if I would have bought this machine if I had known they weren't going to have one.  So, my fingers are crossed that eventually they'll do one. 
 
Marsha


Hoops and various sizes

Cheryl Paul
 

Hi,

I agree with Maggie. Janome gave us what we asked for a larger harp area and also larger hoops as a result of the nice space. We still have a 5" X 5" hoop and the 2" X 4". I used my stabilizers over by putting some together, just overlapping the holes created in the used one. It worked just fine. Thanks for the tip to use an outside piece of something else in the hoop and attaching the stabilizer to it. It can be sewed on or glued gently and that would work quite fine - I just hadn't thought about that.

Maggie, thanks for the web link to a less expensive source of stabilizers.

Cheryl - Saskatoon

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, <theagedpage@...> wrote:

not all of us have the luxury of owning all the machines you speak of - many only have one machine to do everything and have had to trade in our old machines to get a new machine - whether it be the 12000 or anything else.
Linda


Re: Don't lie to your 12000

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

Your issue with Generations is not related to the hoop size, as you've pointed out the design is well within the limits of the 12000 hoop. The problem is that the JEF format contains a hoop code that tells the machine what hoop the design needs. Many of the 3rd party programs use a single code for all designs. In the era of the 10000, you could simply tag each design with the hoop B (5 x 7) designation without regard to the size of the design. When the 11000 came out with the larger hoop, this strategy failed. A design might be coded to use the 5 x 7 hoop, when it was actually 7 x 7. EmbLibrary had a set of clock designs that I fixed for a customer. They were all made for the 8 x 8 hoop, but were set to use a 5 x 7 hoop. The machine rejected them because the design exceeded the bounds of the hoop they were coded for.

Lying to the machine won't work for you, because Generations does not code the design properly. The last machine that they handled correctly was the 10000, and they seem to have a lot of problems with their developer(s) in China getting updates. What you need is a program that will properly format your designs. Naturally I would love to see you get Janome Digitizer MBX, but that's a pretty hefty investment considering what you've already sunk into Generations. Happily there is a solution at a good price - free. Wilcom, the company that authors digitizer software for Janome and Bernina, has a free program called True Sizer. You can download it here: http://www.wilcom.com.au/PRODUCTS/TrueSizer.aspx
Save your design from Generations in a "hoopless" format, such as DST or EMB. Open it in TrueSizer and save it out in JEF format. Then your machine will be happy. Of course those 2 commercial formats don't support colors in the design file, so you'll need to keep track of what color goes in each step, but it's a fairly small price to pay.

Another solution, not free but not break-the-bank expensive, is Buzz Xplore from Buzz Tools. It opens pretty much any format, and will save in JEF format. You can try it free for 3 weeks. Download here: http://www.buzztools.com/updates/bx2-trial.asp

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "sewing2171" <jwragg1@...> wrote:

Hi Jim,

Do you know what the small margin is exactly? I bought the 12000 because I wanted bigger hoops to do larger designs. I am struggling to design in Generations as it is telling me that the design is too large for the hoop. I have made a custom hoop for the 230x300 hoop and the design (have re-sized it many times) is not 200x280 I would have thought that this would fit into the hoop easily but Generations is not accepting of this. Any guidance you could give on the size of the embroidery field would be great. Thanks, Nita


Re: 2nd Group Lesson Embroidery Module

Jim_Stutsman <jim@...>
 

We taught that method of hooping for many years, after learning it from Lindee Goodall. It works well, and saves you time when you are doing a lot of the same thing. We don't use 2 layers of stabilizer automatically, just when the situation calls for more. Rather than spraying adhesive, we usually "float" the stabilizer, meaning we just slide it under the hoop. The stitches will then hold it in place.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Sherry Martin" <shejmartin@...> wrote:

I had my 2nd group lesson on only the embroidery module and Horizon Link today. Didn't learn a whole lot that I hadn't figured out from the manual and my experience with the 11000 before this machine.

However, the instructor did tell us one thing I haven't been doing.

When hooping she says you should loosen the hoop put the fabric and stabilizer and top hoop in the hoop and then tighten the hoop just enough so it takes a pretty good tug to separate the 2 parts of the hoop. Then rehoop your fabric and stabilizer just by pushing the 2 parts of the hoop together on a flat surface without tightening the hoop anymore then you did the 1st time. If the items you hoop are normally about the same thickness, then you should be able to leave the hoop at that tightness for the next time. She stated that a lot of people hoop the fabric too tight by pulling at it after it is in the hoop, and that the fabric should be taut in the hoop but not drum tight. By tightening the hoop to the correct tightness before hooping the fabric you achieve the correct tautness of fabric.

She also says she uses 2 layers of stabilizer on almost everything she does using tear-away on things that aren't washed very much like wall hangings, and cut-away on things that are washed a lot like sweatshirts and tshirts and "topping" on the top of things like towels and minky. She makes sure at least 1 layer of stabilizer is bigger than all sides of the hoop, but the 2nd layer she sometimes attaches by using a little temporary spray adhesive.

Jim, do you have an opinion on what she said? Just curious.


Re: Don't lie to your 12000

sewing2171
 

Hi Jim,

Do you know what the small margin is exactly? I bought the 12000 because I wanted bigger hoops to do larger designs. I am struggling to design in Generations as it is telling me that the design is too large for the hoop. I have made a custom hoop for the 230x300 hoop and the design (have re-sized it many times) is not 200x280 I would have thought that this would fit into the hoop easily but Generations is not accepting of this. Any guidance you could give on the size of the embroidery field would be great. Thanks, Nita

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Jim_Stutsman" <jim@...> wrote:

Each hoop has a small "margin" around the stitching area. This is sort of like the median in a divided highway. You don't drive there, but it adds a bit of safety to keep the cars a little further apart. What they are doing is telling the machine they are using a larger hoop, then placing designs so that they extend into this margin. You have to be super careful not to put them too far in, or the machine will hit the hoop and big trouble ensues. I am NOT giving this "technique" my seal of approval!

You are right about the hoops. Janome can add more hoops at will, and only change the software to support them. What's frustrating is that every embroidery machine prior to this one has had a 5 x 7 hoop. On the 11000 that hoop was added only after a tremendous outcry from users, but it WAS added. Why did they bring out the 12000 without this hoop? One possible clue - the internal model number of the 11000 is 860, while the 12000 is 859. That suggests that the 12000 may have been in development before the 11000, and thus they did not plan for a 5 x 7 hoop. There were probably different teams working on each model, and they may not have exchanged much information with regard to what users want. I'm sure that, given enough screaming from us, Janome will add a 5 x 7 at minimum, and maybe even a 4 x 4.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "gbmko" <gbmko@> wrote:

I'm still new enough at this to be confused. If you just put your design in a "bigger" hoop on the screen, for maximizing placement, and then select the correct hoop for the actual embroidering, will the machine tell you if you made the design too large, and to pick a bigger hoop? Or will you only know by doing the non sew outline feature?

Also, I didn't understand the one comment someone made about not buying the machine if you couldn't upgrade hoops (or something like that). If the machine itself doesn't have a sensor, isn't it just a matter of the software being updated to recognize a new hoop, putting a design in that, and the software telling the embroidery unit what to do for the non sew outline? Obviously, we must be able to use new hoops that Janome comes out with if we are asking for a 5x7...we're not limited to just the "original hoops", correct? Barbara Jean

Sorry for not understanding the mechanics behind all of what is being discussed! Please educate me. thanks Barbara Jean


Re: Searching for the perfect hoop size

Pinguin
 

Sounds like a machine they might have used in a Harry Potter book, like the small tent with all it's room inside ;-)

Gerda


Clearly the best of all possible machines would have a hoop that is a full square meter, 25 needles, a 40" harp, sew 10000 stitches per minute, with both cover stitch and overlock attachments built in, selling for $299. Oh, and it comes mounted on a quilt frame, but weighs only 2 pounds and fits in a handbag for taking to class.




2nd Group Lesson Embroidery Module

Sherry Martin
 

I had my 2nd group lesson on only the embroidery module and Horizon Link today. Didn't learn a whole lot that I hadn't figured out from the manual and my experience with the 11000 before this machine.

However, the instructor did tell us one thing I haven't been doing.

When hooping she says you should loosen the hoop put the fabric and stabilizer and top hoop in the hoop and then tighten the hoop just enough so it takes a pretty good tug to separate the 2 parts of the hoop. Then rehoop your fabric and stabilizer just by pushing the 2 parts of the hoop together on a flat surface without tightening the hoop anymore then you did the 1st time. If the items you hoop are normally about the same thickness, then you should be able to leave the hoop at that tightness for the next time. She stated that a lot of people hoop the fabric too tight by pulling at it after it is in the hoop, and that the fabric should be taut in the hoop but not drum tight. By tightening the hoop to the correct tightness before hooping the fabric you achieve the correct tautness of fabric.

She also says she uses 2 layers of stabilizer on almost everything she does using tear-away on things that aren't washed very much like wall hangings, and cut-away on things that are washed a lot like sweatshirts and tshirts and "topping" on the top of things like towels and minky. She makes sure at least 1 layer of stabilizer is bigger than all sides of the hoop, but the 2nd layer she sometimes attaches by using a little temporary spray adhesive.

Jim, do you have an opinion on what she said? Just curious.


Re: Searching for the perfect hoop size

maggie cooper
 

Unfortunately Janome has gotten caught up in the sewing machine "arms race," where the machine with the biggest hoop is the de-facto winner in the marketplace. In stretching the bed of the 12000, the automatically had the ability to increase the hoop size, and they did. However their faux pas was in ignoring the screams of anguish still echoing from the 11000 release, which failed to include a 5 x 7 hoop. They also ignored their own marketing rhetoric from the 10000 release, at which time they assured us that 80% of all embroidery was done in a 4 x 4 (or smaller) hoop.

Clearly the best of all possible machines would have a hoop that is a full square meter, 25 needles, a 40" harp, sew 10000 stitches per minute, with both cover stitch and overlock attachments built in, selling for $299. Oh, and it comes mounted on a quilt frame, but weighs only 2 pounds and fits in a handbag for taking to class.
Jim, you forgot the lifetime supply of hot meals, laundry service, free embroidery consumables.
My point was quite simple, you buy for your needs. I started sewing in 1964 out economic neccesity, my husbands income was just enough to pay the rent the utility bills, the food but no luxuries like new clothes. It took a year of penny pinching to purchase my first sewing machine. Another year to learn to make wearable garments, and believe me when you have only one set of clothes to cover your nakedness you learn quickly. Fabric by the yard was then plentiful and far less costwise, than purchasing ready made. I had my first child in 64 so I learnt how to make for him, myself and my husband. Discovered I had a talent for it, enjoyed it, and have continued to enjoy it on and off ever since. But I saw no reason to replace my my aging machine for a new all singing all dancing TOL machine just because it was 'new' that machine lasted 40 years, earned me an additional income while my children were growing up, enabled me to pursue what was termed 'machine embroidery' before the arrival of embroidery machines and is now called 'free motion embroidery' I used to create huge free motion embroidery and applique panels, using that machine. It didnt even have a drop feed but used a feed cover. Then in 95 was persuaded by my daughter an embroidery only machine made by Brother, the Snoopy 200, would assist me in my current commisions at that time. A series of 8 x 4 feet wall hangings for a church. I wasnt interested, but at the time was suffering from Bells Palsy which had paralysed one side of my face and killed the blink reflex of my right eye. We had gone to a stitch show, the huge hall was heated by overhead blowers which were causing me considerable discomfort. Just to get away from the stand, the salesman, my daughters persistant cajoling, I purchased the darn machine, a scan n sew, and the software, plus 2 design cards. All I had gone to the show for was a reel of gold cord and pamphlets on a sewing machine.

The 4 x 4 hoop was of course totally inadequate for my needs, but she had many happy hours stitching monograms on towels, designs on items for gifts. My husband bought me a Brother SuperAce 11 sewing mahine as my old faithful was teetering badly, it died the day the new machine was delivered. I wore it out quickly, it wasnt a semi industrial garment makers machine, just a very nice sewing machine for the occasional sewist with more fancy stitches than any garment maker needed. After my DH died, and with a fairly new sewing machine that was already worn out, I purchased a Janome machine, it had an embroidery function which I didnt want, wasnt that interested in, but my dealer who I trust implicitly assured me it was the closest thing to a semi industrial machine for garment sewing on the market at that time. 2003. It has worked without complaint ever since. In 2004 I started to learn the Digitiser Software, discovered I had a natural instinct for it, unlike the Brother software that I'd passed on along with the machine to a housebound friend who passed it back 2 years later as being too difficult. So it got passed on to someone in Ulster who was in dire need of a helping hand.

Then the 11000 launched, my dealer asked me in to attend a demonstration and hands on sewing test, nice machine, but for 1 inch extra height and 3 inch extra embroidery width, even more fancy stitches that I would never ever use, didnt make me grab it. Now the software was different, that I saved for, each time a new upgrade appeared I got it. Each upgrade brought the software closer to what I wanted, the ability to create the full size pictures I could create on my old but now dead first sewing machine. There isnt a hoop on the market big enough for some of my designs, but with version 3 at long last I could create a metre long design, using a 5 x 7 hoop if I wanted, or my 50 cm hoop on my 12 needle machine.
I used to feel for those owners who desperately wanted to stitch the large jacket back designs, but couldnt because A, the hoop sizes were limited, B, they didnt want to learn to digitise or split large designs.

Then when testing the MBX software seeing the 230 x 300 hoop size thought YES at last a hoop that will allow those who dream of stitching a larger design can now realise their dream. But all I read is why doesnt it have a 5x7 hoop or a 4x4 hoop. Well to me thats like reading about someone buying a high performance sports car complaining it doesnt drive like an old model T.

You dont have to buy expensive stabilisers, I buy direct from a wholesaler in 100 metre rolls, if I pay a little extra they'll pre cut it into squares or rectangles for me. It costs substanially less than the 2 big 'name' brands, which I've tried and found wanting.
I buy my needles for my janome 1000v3 by the 100, I get my embroidery thread from a wholesaler. If I want to stitch a design on a piece of fabric that's a tad small to be hooped, I use the sewing machine to attach side panels out of fabric off cuts, worn bed sheets, old shirts, its called being thrifty. Why upgrade then expect the specs of an older model? I know orders were placed for 12000 machines long before its specs were published, why? how can anyone know if its going to be right for the work they intend doing without at least seeing the specifications and seeing what it has to offer. If they read the specs then they could at least make an informed enquiry, then wait till they at least can see it in action or test drive it.

My MC 10000 still works quietly and efficiently, is a brilliant sewing machine still, has more than enough utilty stitches, I rarely use the decorative stitches, I bought an inexpensive Janome 644D serger for those tedious jobs like drapes or bed linen, which I make rather than buy so I can save towards my replacement machine, and as much as I'd like the new 12000, it would have to be for sewing not embroidery that I buy it. The juries still out on that one.
Maggie Coops


Re: transferring design

judithrs <abbieshat@...>
 

Thanks, problem solved ...it was the Jef vs Jan...crazy....
Judy

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "judithrs" <abbieshat@...> wrote:



--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Bea Rosier" <bearosier@> wrote:

You have to take the design into the Easy Design Program and save it as a
.jef (if it isn't already) to your transfer media.


The design is in Design Gallery( digitizer MBX4), how exactly do I transfer it. I want to send it to the janome 12000, I assume I need to use Horizon link
Many thanks
Judy


From: janome12000@yahoogroups.com [mailto:janome12000@yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of judithrs
Sent: Saturday, January 28, 2012 2:06 PM
To: janome12000@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [janome12000] transferring design





Three of us are sitting here and cannot transfer a design from design
gallery to the Janome 12000...help....
Thanks
Judy


Re: Don't lie to your 12000

Sherry Martin
 

I totally agree with you. I stitch designs of all different sizes not just large designs (I'm not going to put a large design on a tshirt for my 2 yr old granddaughter for example - which could probably be done with a 4x4 hoop). I only have one machine, the 12000. As I upgraded to the next machine I needed to either sell or trade-in my former machine to be able to afford the next level. And I don't use expensive branded stabilizers, but all stabilizers do cost money even if it is an off-brand especially specialty stabilizers like sticky or water soluble.

I love the big hoops, but feel that such an expensive machine should be able to accommodate hoops in smaller sizes also.

I actually purchased this machine more for the regular sewing features than the sizes of hoops it comes with, but as I said before because of cost it is my only machine.

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, <theagedpage@...> wrote:

not all of us have the luxury of owning all the machines you speak of - many only have one machine to do everything and have had to trade in our old machines to get a new machine - whether it be the 12000 or anything else.
Linda

---- maggiecoops <maggiecoops@...> wrote:


--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Jim_Stutsman" <jim@> wrote:

You are right about the hoops. Janome can add more hoops at will, and only change the software to support them. What's frustrating is that every embroidery machine prior to this one has had a 5 x 7 hoop. On the 11000 that hoop was added only after a tremendous outcry from users, but it WAS added. Why did they bring out the 12000 without this hoop? One possible clue - the internal model number of the 11000 is 860, while the 12000 is 859. That suggests that the 12000 may have been in development before the 11000, and thus they did not plan for a 5 x 7 hoop. There were probably different teams working on each model, and they may not have exchanged much information with regard to what users want. I'm sure that, given enough screaming from us, Janome will add a 5 x 7 at minimum, and maybe even a 4 x 4.
Jim, I may be bit dense, but WHY purchase a machine with large hoops if your preference is to stitch small designs. I purchased an Industrial embroidery machine after seeing the specs of the 11000 when that was launched. I saw no reason to upgrade from a perfectly serviceable 10000 with its 140x200 hoop to get a 200x200 hoop. I wanted a machine that could embroider jacket back designs in a single hooping.

I'm also reading numerous complaints about wasting fabric and stabilisers. If users insist upon purchasing expensive 'Branded' stabilisers instead of perfectly good suitable unbranded stabilisers such as those sold by http://www.brothermall2.com/Stabilizers/Default.aspx?PCID=6
which commercial embroiderers use day and day out and leave the domestic embroiderers to pay through the nose for 'Names' then yes there is waste. But whose fault is that? certainly not Janomes. They produced what the customers said they wanted, larger hoops, bigger harp area, and thats what they delivered.

As for fabric waste, stitch 'stretcher' strips to the edges of your fabrics, then when embroidered remove the stretchers to be used again.

I know when the 3 of us were testing the software, I was delighted to see at long last Janome had included large hoops (though still not large enough for my needs,) I'm still seriously debating with myself if I 'need,' want, or would just like a 12000. I have to confess if I was offered one I would grab it, but for sewing only. Having been spoiled by owning a 12 needle embroidery machine, the idea of returning to a single needle combi, doesnt fill me with joy. Had the 11000 had the 12000 hoop sizes then I probably would have purchased that and not an industrial machine, but kept my 10000 for the small designs.

Maggie Coops


Re: transferring design

judithrs <abbieshat@...>
 

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, "Bea Rosier" <bearosier@...> wrote:

You have to take the design into the Easy Design Program and save it as a
.jef (if it isn't already) to your transfer media.


The design is in Design Gallery( digitizer MBX4), how exactly do I transfer it. I want to send it to the janome 12000, I assume I need to use Horizon link
Many thanks
Judy


From: janome12000@yahoogroups.com [mailto:janome12000@yahoogroups.com] On
Behalf Of judithrs
Sent: Saturday, January 28, 2012 2:06 PM
To: janome12000@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [janome12000] transferring design





Three of us are sitting here and cannot transfer a design from design
gallery to the Janome 12000...help....
Thanks
Judy


Re: transferring design

Bea Rosier <bearosier@...>
 

You have to take the design into the Easy Design Program and save it as a .jef (if it isn’t already) to your transfer media.

 

 

From: janome12000@... [mailto:janome12000@...] On Behalf Of judithrs
Sent: Saturday, January 28, 2012 2:06 PM
To: janome12000@...
Subject: [janome12000] transferring design

 

 

Three of us are sitting here and cannot transfer a design from design gallery to the Janome 12000...help....
Thanks
Judy


Re: Don't lie to your 12000 re linda

maggie cooper
 

--- In janome12000@yahoogroups.com, <theagedpage@...> wrote:

not all of us have the luxury of owning all the machines you speak of - many only have one machine to do everything and have had to trade in our old machines to get a new machine - whether it be the 12000 or anything else.
Linda

---- maggiecoops <maggiecoops@...> wrote:
Linda, I am an old age pensioner,widowed, on a VERY limited pension, I have to scritch and scratch to purchase anything, my 12 needle machine was 2nd hand, my next machine will be paid for from the pennies I save by not buying big name stabilisers, every must have gadget, making my own clothes as others wear so badly they have to be replaced. I've been saving for 4 years now to buy a replacement sewing machine, so I'm going to look very carefully before I buy. It has to meet certain criteria, if it doesnt I'll just sigh and continue looking.
I only spoke of 2 machines, the MC10000 and the Industrial 12 needle machine I purchased at a lesser cost 2nd hand than the 11000 was being sold for. I dont buy because its a TOL machine, I buy because I need a machine to do what I want, at a price I can afford,and the best build quality for I what I'm asked to pay, and if that means spending another year scrimping and saving, so be it.