Date   

Re: PC link

shejmartin1
 

Also don't forget you have to put the USB drive into the machine before you load the designs, so that it will make the folders that the designs have to go into.



Sherry


Re: free motion sewing

shejmartin1
 

I just push the tshirt icon.  Then I go to "free quilting" and choose the lower left icon for free motion quilting with the little plastic feet (I like the QO foot the best).  Those feet just fit on the machine like any other presser feet.  I like these feet better than the darning foot.

I usually use 40 wt polyester thread in both top and bottom (usually a brand called Exquisite because I like the sheen it has)  and I've never had to adjust the tension any further.  I also just use the regular bobbin case; not the ones with colors on them.  I've experimented with the others and haven't seen much of a difference.   I also usually use a Janome blue tip needle and I love Quilters Dream polyester batting; but I also use cotton, like "warm & natural" sometimes.  I haven't ever used a thick batting or any other kind of backing except cotton or flannel so I don't know how that would change the settings.  I'm sure you'd probably have to use a size 14 needle, don't know about other setting changes.  Oh, I also always wear gloves when I free motion quilt.  There is a brand called Machinger (I think?) that I like

My instructor when I got the machine, free motions by removing the foot pedal, setting the machine speed to whatever she likes and then just pushes the button on the machine to start and stop.  I don't like that because I can't seem to think ahead, take a hand off the fabric, and have my finger up at the stop button when I need to.


Re: free motion sewing

vicki chrobak
 

Nita, What type of free-motion are you trying to do--embroidery,
quilting, variable zigzag? Press the T shirt icon on home menu, then
press right arrow & choose quilting. Then you can choose straight
stitch, zigzag or variable ZZ which allows you to use the knee bar to
vary the width of ZZ. You can leave pedal plugged in or use the speed
control on your machine. I suggest you try them all to see which work
best for you & your particular project. Just use the appropriate feet &
stitch plate, esp. with ZZ--ask me how I know, LOL.


--
Vicki Jo (aka VJo)
T-Town Woman




On 9/1/2014 5:07 AM, jwragg1@bigpond.com [janome12000] wrote:
i, I have the Janome 12000 and am having trouble getting my settings
right for free motion sewing. Does anyone do this and have their
favourite settings that they use? Any suggestions? Thanking you in
advance, regards, Nita





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Re: free motion sewing

Anne Parker <annegparker@...>
 

I tried out the QO foot on the 15000 during my trial as that just holds the foot at a set height above the sandwich - which you can set to what you prefer if you don't like the default setting, and of course you need to set it close enough to the fabric in order for the lockstitch to be made properly.  I just loved it as there is no bouncing foot to distract you (which is similar to my Elna Diva which I have been testing FMQ out on).  On the 15000, if I remember correctly you have to go to the Quilting application and then select straight stitch 2 to get the foot displayed on the screen.

Being able to use a non-bouncing foot was one of my 'wants' when I went looking at machines.

Anne
​ in Stubbington, UK​

www.sewingtales.wordpress.com

With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy.  "Desiderata" Max Ehrmann


On 1 September 2014 18:18, 'Prudience Lewis' ptomik@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:
 

After changing to the straight needle plate and the bobbin holder and the PD-H foot.  The settings are quilting on the panel…then you select free motion quilting….that’s it.  It worked beautifully for me.  I think I also changed the needle to a 14size.   I also tried the QC, QO feet for a flatter quilt sandwich. Prudience

 

 

 

From: janome12000@... [mailto:janome12000@...]
Sent: Monday, September 01, 2014 5:08 AM
To: janome12000@...
Subject: [janome12000] free motion sewing

 

 

Hi, I have the Janome 12000 and am having trouble getting my settings right for free motion sewing.  Does anyone do this and have their favourite settings that they use?  Any suggestions?  Thanking you in advance, regards, Nita



Re: free motion sewing

Prudience Lewis
 

After changing to the straight needle plate and the bobbin holder and the PD-H foot.  The settings are quilting on the panel…then you select free motion quilting….that’s it.  It worked beautifully for me.  I think I also changed the needle to a 14size.   I also tried the QC, QO feet for a flatter quilt sandwich. Prudience

 

 

 

From: janome12000@... [mailto:janome12000@...]
Sent: Monday, September 01, 2014 5:08 AM
To: janome12000@...
Subject: [janome12000] free motion sewing

 

 

Hi, I have the Janome 12000 and am having trouble getting my settings right for free motion sewing.  Does anyone do this and have their favourite settings that they use?  Any suggestions?  Thanking you in advance, regards, Nita


PC link

Judi Anderson
 


I have a new (to me) 12000 - less than 1 year old in perfect condition.  It embroiders great with the internal designs.  I'm trying to connect my laptop thru Horizon link and use the .jef designs I have in my computer.  I can see the designs in the Document list but when I try to send it to the machine, it says the machine is not connected?  It is connected with the proper cord that comes with machine for that purpose.  What am I doing wrong?  When I put a flash drive in the side of the machine, it won't take that either and gives me a circle with a slash thru it.  Am I supposed to use a special flash drive.  Please help - so frustrating - as it doesn't do much good to have an embroidery machine if I can't send designs over.  Thanks so much.

 

Judi



Not being much good unless he can answer, Jim struggles valiantly:

Your problem with the cable connection is probably due to the lack of a driver. The last option on the HorizonLink menu installs a USB driver. Once that's done you should be able to use the cable.


The issue with the USB drive is most likely the USB drive itself. Some of them have special backup software installed and the drive is initialized so that it looks like a CD as well as a flash drive. The machine has no idea what to do with that. It also works best with USB drives that have a capacity of 2GB or less. Try a different one and you should have better luck.


free motion sewing

sewing2171
 

Hi, I have the Janome 12000 and am having trouble getting my settings right for free motion sewing.  Does anyone do this and have their favourite settings that they use?  Any suggestions?  Thanking you in advance, regards, Nita


Re: Acute sign app

ceilsews <no_reply@...>
 

Sue, when you say "I don't recall ever seeing commercially didgitized lettering large for monogramming things like towels," do you mean that you need websites where such monogramming lettering is available?  There are a bunch of good sites out there and you don't have to do it yourself. 
Just in case, here's one such site: http://www.embroiderydesigns.com/fonts/monograms.aspx
Ceil


Re: Acute sign app

Sue Raabe <susies.stitches@...>
 

I follow the posts, but rarely comment or ask questions!  My 12000 is about a year old now.  I sold my Elissimo and bought the floor model from a very reliable Janome only dealer.  I didn't have any problems with the Babylock, but a good friend swears by the Janome, so I decided to give it a whirl.  Although this is a machine group, I have a question about resizing designs.  Recently I was told that even if the software has the ability to adjust density when resizingm it still isn't wise to change it by more than 20%.   If that's true. how do you change the size of lettering for monograms?  I have Wilcom, and it seems to have an uper and lower limit for sizing.  The software is way over my head, and way more than I need, but unfortunately, I'm a such a sucker for sales pitches!  Software aside, is there any definitive answer for the resizing question?  I don't recall ever seeing commercially didgitized lettering large for monogramming things like towels.  Right now,my primary goal is to figure out how to use the 12000 more fully.  I bought the DVD, but of course never got around to watching it!  If this question isn't appropriate for this group, I'll understand.  After reading the comments of the software, it just popped into my head :-)



Waiting for an answer to pop into his head, Jim decides to wing it:
When a designer creates an embroidery design, she builds it with a particular size in mind. In addition to just filling areas with stitches, she must consider the pulling effect the stitches will have on the fabric. Even resizing software that maintains the stitch density cannot maintain the structure of the design past a certain point. Consider satin stitches for example. Layers of satin stitches that follow the contours of an object can be used to create lifelike fur. However if the design is enlarged too much, those satin stitches must be changed to weave stitches, which have a completely different look. This is also true for monograms, where curves and angles are critically important for lettering integrity. When you need lettering of a certain size it's a good idea to experiment with different fonts to see what works best.

Wilcom software is excellent, but the sheer number of tools and options can be daunting. There are many resources on the web for learning how to use them. A good place to start is Trevor Conquergood's digitizer workshops. Trevor learned digitizing when it was really difficult - each stitch had to be manually placed. There are some exquisite monogram packages available from EmbroideryArts.com.  The letters in each set are digitized to be a large size (2" - 5") so resizing is not necessary. We sold their designs in our store and they were very well done.


Re: MC15000 Thread Wound Around Bobbin Winder

Patricia Ward
 

Hey Sherry, glad you got it all out... now you don't have to bake brownies!  LOL  

Happy for you that you got it out.  Yes, Jim usually has the answers! 

Pat


On Sun, Aug 31, 2014 at 3:27 PM, Sguequierre@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:


It worked!  Jim you are a savior!

Sherry




MC15000 Thread Wound Around Bobbin Winder

JoAnn Novak
 

 I had this happen to me also.  I just kept gently pulling the thread until
 I got it all.  I am a lot more careful now.

 JoAnn
Life's biggest decision is what you do with Jesus.

 

Thanks Jim.  I will keep at it.  

Sherry


Re: MC15000 Thread Wound Around Bobbin Winder

Sguequierre@...
 

It worked!  Jim you are a savior!

Sherry


Re: MC15000 Thread Wound Around Bobbin Winder

Sguequierre@...
 

Thanks Jim.  I will keep at it.  
Sherry


MC15000 Thread Wound Around Bobbin Winder

Sguequierre@...
 

Jim,

I tried to wind a bobbin but ended up with thread wound around underneath the little thing that cuts the thread.  I've tried to unwind it but have been unsuccessful.  Is there a trick or do I need to take it in?  Also I know when changing thread to cut at the spool and pull at the needle but is it better to have the machine locked or unlocked when doing that?  Thank you so much for your help.

Sherry



Trying to unwind, Jim says:

Things that turn at high speed can create the technician's nightmare. The only trick I know is patience and time. You don't have much access to get to the thread, so it's difficult to get started. I would suggest a long needle, such as a tapestry needle, that can reach under the cutting disk. Tease at the thread to see if you can free up an end long enough to grab with tweezers. Once you have the end of it you can slowly turn the winder stem in reverse while pulling and eventually get it out. Failing that I would suggest a trip to your technician. A plate of brownies wouldn't hurt.


Re: Acute sign app

Colleen
 

Hi Jim. That is a wonderful explanation but I think I might wait a while before purchasing but a hundred million thank you. CB

Sent from my iPad

On 31/08/2014, at 8:48 am, "newfiddler@... [janome12000]" <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

Hi Jim Could you please explain to me what the acu design app does. It must be good for $50.CB 




Never having been good enough to command a $50 price, Jim says:

We've been so busy finishing up the videos that we haven't done much with AcuDesign, but I do have some opinions based on playing with it.. Janome dealers are being told that it's essentially Digitizer Jr. for the iPad. That's not completely wrong, but it's not completely accurate either. Perhaps because it is based on DRAWings Snap, the first thing you notice is designs - a LOT of designs, all free with the app. Sadly they are all auto-digitized using DRAWings software and few, if any, would be even close to the quality of even the original Janome 8000 Memory Cards. Don't buy the app for the designs!


The app does give you the ability to get designs into the iPad without the clunky route through iTunes. It will read designs from Dropbox, AirStash, and a number of wireless USB products. It will also download designs from the machine, but I have not had much luck with downloading from the machine using any app. I'm hoping the V2 update will improve that.


Once you have a design in the app you can do a fair bit of editing on it. You can make it larger or smaller, without changing density. (At least that's what we're told - we have not tested this!) You can change colors, remove parts, insert other designs and generally do whatever you want short of actual digitizing. When you finish you can send the design to Dropbox, all the various wireless USB devices or the machine itself. This last one is interesting, for as hard as it is to READ designs from the machine, they WRITE almost instantly and reliably. Even better, you don't have to don't have to go through the agony of finding the machine and waiting forever while it locates and connects to it, as the Janome apps do. It just finds the machine by itself.


Overall, again just playing with it for a few minutes, I've found it to be kind of buggy with documentation that doesn't quite match up to the app. This is definitely a version 1 product that could have used a bit more time in the oven. If you have already bought it, do not despair - I'm sure it will be updated and the updates are free. But if you haven't taken the plunge just yet, I would hold off just a bit for the first update.


Acute sign app

Colleen
 

Hi Jim Could you please explain to me what the acu design app does. It must be good for $50.CB 




Never having been good enough to command a $50 price, Jim says:

We've been so busy finishing up the videos that we haven't done much with AcuDesign, but I do have some opinions based on playing with it. Janome dealers are being told that it's essentially Digitizer Jr. for the iPad. That's not completely wrong, but it's not completely accurate either. Perhaps because it is based on DRAWings Snap, the first thing you notice is designs - a LOT of designs, all free with the app. Sadly they are all auto-digitized using DRAWings software and few, if any, would be even close to the quality of even the original Janome 8000 Memory Cards. Don't buy the app for the designs!


The app does give you the ability to get designs into the iPad without the clunky route through iTunes. It will read designs from Dropbox, AirStash, and a number of wireless USB products. It will also download designs from the machine, but I have not had much luck with downloading from the machine using any app. I'm hoping the V2 update will improve that.


Once you have a design in the app you can do a fair bit of editing on it. You can make it larger or smaller, without changing density. (At least that's what we're told - we have not tested this!) You can change colors, remove parts, insert other designs and generally do whatever you want short of actual digitizing. When you finish you can send the design to Dropbox, all the various wireless USB devices or the machine itself. This last one is interesting, for as hard as it is to READ designs from the machine, they WRITE almost instantly and reliably. Even better, you don't have to don't have to go through the agony of finding the machine and waiting forever while it locates and connects to it, as the Janome apps do. It just finds the machine by itself.


Overall, again just playing with it for a few minutes, I've found it to be kind of buggy with documentation that doesn't quite match up to the app. This is definitely a version 1 product that could have used a bit more time in the oven. If you have already bought it, do not despair - I'm sure it will be updated and the updates are free. But if you haven't taken the plunge just yet, I would hold off just a bit for the first update.


Re: acufill hoops w/magnets

Benny Malone
 

This sounds like a great idea! It becomes a two step quilting process--parts, then the whole. The complicated quilting is done by the embroidery function of the machine and then switch to the machine's ordinary sewing function to structurally complete the quilt. No free-motion! After several classes and shoulder-aching aftermaths, I've decided that free-motioning quilting isn't for me. But I love the look, and myJanome 15000! Thanks for sharing this technique. 

Sent from my iPad

On Aug 30, 2014, at 7:13 AM, "J Fraker frakersfunnyfarm@... [janome12000]" <janome12000@...> wrote:

 

Yes, the whole quilt top is done.  The batting is cut slightly larger than the quilt top.  Then the top and batting are quilted.  I start somewhere in the middle of the quilt and work my way outward all the way around.  I can roll up the quilt top and find that I don't even have to do any pinning this way.  I just quilt a small space, then smooth the batting outward and quilt another space, kind of working in circles outward from the center until the whole top is quilted.  The backing is cut slightly larger than the now quilted top and batting.  The backing is then layered with the already quilted top and batting and I just stitch in the ditch around some of the blocks using a walking foot.  It isn't necessary for the backing to be densely quilted, just the top and batting.  This eliminates a lot of bulk when doing the actual quilting.  It is kind of an extra step, but the time and effort it saves in not having to wrestle a huge quilt in the hoop more than makes up for it.

From: "quiltless@... [janome12000]" <janome12000@...>
To: janome12000@...
Sent: Friday, August 29, 2014 8:07 PM
Subject: Re: [janome12000] Re: acufill hoops w/magnets

 
I didn't understand J Fraker's response, but it sounds like a very interesting quilting method
.  
So you don't make the whole top before quilting?  
Is the batting cut to the same size as the quilt block?  
How do you join the blocks?  


---In janome12000@..., wrote :

When I am quilting with the embroidery machine, I hoop only the top and batting.  Then the backing can be added by just doing some stitching in the ditch around blocks.  ...



Re: acufill hoops w/magnets

joyofsew@...
 

This sounds great thanks for the info I'm a new quilter and I have only tied my quilt


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPhone


From: J Fraker frakersfunnyfarm@... [janome12000] ;
To: ;
Subject: Re: [janome12000] Re: acufill hoops w/magnets
Sent: Sat, Aug 30, 2014 12:13:29 PM

 

Yes, the whole quilt top is done.  The batting is cut slightly larger than the quilt top.  Then the top and batting are quilted.  I start somewhere in the middle of the quilt and work my way outward all the way around.  I can roll up the quilt top and find that I don't even have to do any pinning this way.  I just quilt a small space, then smooth the batting outward and quilt another space, kind of working in circles outward from the center until the whole top is quilted.  The backing is cut slightly larger than the now quilted top and batting.  The backing is then layered with the already quilted top and batting and I just stitch in the ditch around some of the blocks using a walking foot.  It isn't necessary for the backing to be densely quilted, just the top and batting.  This eliminates a lot of bulk when doing the actual quilting.  It is kind of an extra step, but the time and effort it saves in not having to wrestle a huge quilt in the hoop more than makes up for it.

From: "quiltless@... [janome12000]"
To: janome12000@...
Sent: Friday, August 29, 2014 8:07 PM
Subject: Re: [janome12000] Re: acufill hoops w/magnets

 
I didn't understand J Fraker's response, but it sounds like a very interesting quilting method
.  
So you don't make the whole top before quilting?  
Is the batting cut to the same size as the quilt block?  
How do you join the blocks?  


---In janome12000@..., wrote :

When I am quilting with the embroidery machine, I hoop only the top and batting.  Then the backing can be added by just doing some stitching in the ditch around blocks.  ...



Re: acufill hoops w/magnets

J Fraker
 

Yes, the whole quilt top is done.  The batting is cut slightly larger than the quilt top.  Then the top and batting are quilted.  I start somewhere in the middle of the quilt and work my way outward all the way around.  I can roll up the quilt top and find that I don't even have to do any pinning this way.  I just quilt a small space, then smooth the batting outward and quilt another space, kind of working in circles outward from the center until the whole top is quilted.  The backing is cut slightly larger than the now quilted top and batting.  The backing is then layered with the already quilted top and batting and I just stitch in the ditch around some of the blocks using a walking foot.  It isn't necessary for the backing to be densely quilted, just the top and batting.  This eliminates a lot of bulk when doing the actual quilting.  It is kind of an extra step, but the time and effort it saves in not having to wrestle a huge quilt in the hoop more than makes up for it.

From: "quiltless@... [janome12000]"
To: janome12000@...
Sent: Friday, August 29, 2014 8:07 PM
Subject: Re: [janome12000] Re: acufill hoops w/magnets

 
I didn't understand J Fraker's response, but it sounds like a very interesting quilting method
.  
So you don't make the whole top before quilting?  
Is the batting cut to the same size as the quilt block?  
How do you join the blocks?  


---In janome12000@..., wrote :

When I am quilting with the embroidery machine, I hoop only the top and batting.  Then the backing can be added by just doing some stitching in the ditch around blocks.  ...



Re: Prewound bobbins

Donna Morton
 

I use the Class 15 pre-wound Wonderfil bobbins all the time.  They are very good quality and.
 
Donna M
Canada
http:\\www.snipandstitch.com

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