Re: 15000 screen


JOLLYNE TOSTE <jtoste@...>
 

 A wiser man I’m not sure I’ve met:)  Thank you Jim for saying the obvious. I was wondering how many 15000 users were running around their machine with scissors?  There is very little space in my sewing area to pick up enough speed to do damage even if I did have a weapon of screen damaging potential in my hands:)  
Your gift of humor brings a smile to my face frequently!! 
Jollyne
Calif.

On Dec 17, 2015, at 10:40 PM, pat brioady pibby357@... [janome12000] <janome12000@...> wrote:

Looking for Jim's sage advice and counsel: 

Although I don't have it for my iPad, but I do for my iphone, there is a film made (several different manufacturers, generally available from computer stores, Amazon, etc) to cover various touch screens which allows the touch screen to still be touch sensitive. It doesn't require any glue or other fixative to stick, and is easily removable. I'm wondering if this type of material could be used to protect our machine's touch screen? It would most likely need to be trimmed to fit, especially if we acquired the size for an iPad... 

Pat

Sent from my iPad

Fresh out of sage, Jim falls back on some rosemary and thyme to say:
There are some types of display protectors that do not have adhesive, but instead rely on electrostatic attraction to stay in place. They are made to go against a glass screen. If the 15000 screen is like that of the 11000, it has a plastic film covering over the glass and this may not allow the protector to stick. You will need to trim it to fit, because part of what makes this type of protection work is to have no space between the protective film and the glass.

It may be instructive to step back and take a breath. We've had exactly one report of a screen scratch. If only 1 in 4 members of this list has a 12000 or 15000, then there is a 0.25% chance that any member will experience the problem. If you have wolverine claws then protection is probably mandated, but for the majority I think just being mindful while holding sharp instruments will probably suffice.

Another barometer of risk would be prior experience. With your first-born child even the slightest sound from the crib sends you leaping from your barely-asleep state, racing to check on the baby. With each subsequent child your sleep gets deeper and you find yourself waiting through 5 minutes or more of crying to see if they'll go back to sleep. If your machine(s) that you had/have prior to the 12000 or 15000 have undamaged screens, then your risk is probably minimal.


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