Topics

Speaking ARIA Current Attribute

Jim Homme
 

Hi,

By looking at the log I cannot figure out how to examine when NVDA speaks the aria-current attribute and I am wondering what other information I am missing when doing accessibility testing, so hopefully this is the right place to ask, because I am trying to start understanding the source and how to get information about what’s going on with how things work.

 

With that preamble out of the way, here is what I did. I went to this page.

 

https://www.gatsbyjs.org/tutorial/

 

When I got there, one of the links  said “Current page,” so I tried to look in the log to see if I could see that piece of text in the two name and description lines. I did not see it.

 

So next, I right clicked the link in Firefox and chose Inspect Element. Once I found the element, I right clicked it in the tree of code elements in the developer tools and copied the outer HTML, then brought it into my text editor to examine it. This is how I found the aria-current=”page” code, which I believe is making NVDA realize that the link is visually showing a sighted person that this is the current page.

 

This brings up two questions. Where does NVDA speak this, and why is it not in either the name or description areas?

 

Thanks.


Jim

 

 

==========

Jim Homme

Digital Accessibility

Bender Consulting Services

412-787-8567

https://www.benderconsult.com/our%20services/hightest-accessible-technology-solutions

 

James Scholes
 

In the log viewer, you'll find the current page state in the IAccessible2 attributes. It's not listed in either the name or description, because it's not a part of the name or description. It's a stateful attribute.

Think of a check box, for an example of a more familiar control. You wouldn't want the fact that it was checked or not checked to appear in the description or name of the control, because then that would appear to users as text. Whether a check box is checked, not checked or half-checked is a part of that control's state, and therefore NVDA stores and speaks that state appropriately. Same goes for current page links, same page links, visited links, headings at a particular level, and so on.

Regards,

James Scholes

On 17/05/2019 at 3:40 pm, Jim Homme wrote:
Hi,
By looking at the log I cannot figure out how to examine when NVDA speaks the aria-current attribute and I am wondering what other information I am missing when doing accessibility testing, so hopefully this is the right place to ask, because I am trying to start understanding the source and how to get information about what’s going on with how things work.
With that preamble out of the way, here is what I did. I went to this page.
https://www.gatsbyjs.org/tutorial/
When I got there, one of the links  said “Current page,” so I tried to look in the log to see if I could see that piece of text in the two name and description lines. I did not see it.
So next, I right clicked the link in Firefox and chose Inspect Element. Once I found the element, I right clicked it in the tree of code elements in the developer tools and copied the outer HTML, then brought it into my text editor to examine it. This is how I found the aria-current=”page” code, which I believe is making NVDA realize that the link is visually showing a sighted person that this is the current page.
This brings up two questions. Where does NVDA speak this, and why is it not in either the name or description areas?
Thanks.
Jim
==========
Jim Homme
Digital Accessibility
Bender Consulting Services
412-787-8567
https://www.benderconsult.com/our%20services/hightest-accessible-technology-solutions

Reef Turner
 

Not wanting to assume any level of familiarity, I'll just extend on a few things James said.

I am assuming you already have considered the logging level set in NVDA, if not look at NVDA general settings panel.
To get to the information that James is talking about, which we call "dev info", press NVDA+F1 this will also open the log viewer.

On Fri, 17 May 2019 at 23:17, James Scholes <james@...> wrote:
In the log viewer, you'll find the current page state in the
IAccessible2 attributes.  It's not listed in either the name or
description, because it's not a part of the name or description.  It's a
stateful attribute.

Think of a check box, for an example of a more familiar control.  You
wouldn't want the fact that it was checked or not checked to appear in
the description or name of the control, because then that would appear
to users as text.  Whether a check box is checked, not checked or
half-checked is a part of that control's state, and therefore NVDA
stores and speaks that state appropriately.  Same goes for current page
links, same page links, visited links, headings at a particular level,
and so on.

Regards,

James Scholes

On 17/05/2019 at 3:40 pm, Jim Homme wrote:
> Hi,
>
> By looking at the log I cannot figure out how to examine when NVDA
> speaks the aria-current attribute and I am wondering what other
> information I am missing when doing accessibility testing, so hopefully
> this is the right place to ask, because I am trying to start
> understanding the source and how to get information about what’s going
> on with how things work.
>
> With that preamble out of the way, here is what I did. I went to this page.
>
> https://www.gatsbyjs.org/tutorial/
>
> When I got there, one of the links  said “Current page,” so I tried to
> look in the log to see if I could see that piece of text in the two name
> and description lines. I did not see it.
>
> So next, I right clicked the link in Firefox and chose Inspect Element.
> Once I found the element, I right clicked it in the tree of code
> elements in the developer tools and copied the outer HTML, then brought
> it into my text editor to examine it. This is how I found the
> aria-current=”page” code, which I believe is making NVDA realize that
> the link is visually showing a sighted person that this is the current
> page.
>
> This brings up two questions. Where does NVDA speak this, and why is it
> not in either the name or description areas?
>
> Thanks.
>
>
> Jim
>
> ==========
>
> Jim Homme
>
> Digital Accessibility
>
> Bender Consulting Services
>
> 412-787-8567
>
> https://www.benderconsult.com/our%20services/hightest-accessible-technology-solutions
>
>





--
Reef Turner
Software Developer 
 


Jim Homme
 

Hi,

I was partly unclear when I asked the original question. I’m getting familiar on my own with the NVDA source, and wanted to try to read the code that populates the log. I was thinking that if I could find it in the log, I could somehow search for where the code puts it in. Apologies for being non-technical.

 

Jim

 

 

 

==========

Jim Homme

Digital Accessibility

Bender Consulting Services

412-787-8567

https://www.benderconsult.com/our%20services/hightest-accessible-technology-solutions

 

From: nvda-devel@groups.io <nvda-devel@groups.io> On Behalf Of Reef Turner via Groups.Io
Sent: Wednesday, May 22, 2019 6:58 AM
To: nvda-devel@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nvda-devel] Speaking ARIA Current Attribute

 

Not wanting to assume any level of familiarity, I'll just extend on a few things James said.

 

I am assuming you already have considered the logging level set in NVDA, if not look at NVDA general settings panel.

To get to the information that James is talking about, which we call "dev info", press NVDA+F1 this will also open the log viewer.

 

On Fri, 17 May 2019 at 23:17, James Scholes <james@...> wrote:

In the log viewer, you'll find the current page state in the
IAccessible2 attributes.  It's not listed in either the name or
description, because it's not a part of the name or description.  It's a
stateful attribute.

Think of a check box, for an example of a more familiar control.  You
wouldn't want the fact that it was checked or not checked to appear in
the description or name of the control, because then that would appear
to users as text.  Whether a check box is checked, not checked or
half-checked is a part of that control's state, and therefore NVDA
stores and speaks that state appropriately.  Same goes for current page
links, same page links, visited links, headings at a particular level,
and so on.

Regards,

James Scholes

On 17/05/2019 at 3:40 pm, Jim Homme wrote:
> Hi,
>
> By looking at the log I cannot figure out how to examine when NVDA
> speaks the aria-current attribute and I am wondering what other
> information I am missing when doing accessibility testing, so hopefully
> this is the right place to ask, because I am trying to start
> understanding the source and how to get information about what’s going
> on with how things work.
>
> With that preamble out of the way, here is what I did. I went to this page.
>
> https://www.gatsbyjs.org/tutorial/
>
> When I got there, one of the links  said “Current page,” so I tried to
> look in the log to see if I could see that piece of text in the two name
> and description lines. I did not see it.
>
> So next, I right clicked the link in Firefox and chose Inspect Element.
> Once I found the element, I right clicked it in the tree of code
> elements in the developer tools and copied the outer HTML, then brought
> it into my text editor to examine it. This is how I found the
> aria-current=”page” code, which I believe is making NVDA realize that
> the link is visually showing a sighted person that this is the current
> page.
>
> This brings up two questions. Where does NVDA speak this, and why is it
> not in either the name or description areas?
>
> Thanks.
>
>
> Jim
>
> ==========
>
> Jim Homme
>
> Digital Accessibility
>
> Bender Consulting Services
>
> 412-787-8567
>
> https://www.benderconsult.com/our%20services/hightest-accessible-technology-solutions
>
>



 

--

Reef Turner
Software Developer 

 

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