Topics

Basic Ham Emcomm Presentation for Town Leadership

Steve Hansen
 

Does anyone have a very basic amateur radio emcomm presentation that would be suitable for a small town's civil leadership? (Town council, police, fire.)

The background is that a group of hams in one of our county's towns is trying to get the attention of the town management, many of whom don't see a need for amateur radio support. In fact, they seem to have a rather passive attitude toward communications preparedness in general.

I've got any number of presentations but they are mostly about why you might want to get a ham license or details on specific emcomm tools, but nothing that's more marketing oriented.

Thanks and 73,
Steve KB1TCE

KG5JUP <kg5jup@...>
 

I would be happy to assist in creating one. 

Sent from my iPhone

On Jul 27, 2017, at 2:26 PM, Steve Hansen <shansen@...> wrote:

Does anyone have a very basic amateur radio emcomm presentation that would be suitable for a small town's civil leadership? (Town council, police, fire.)

The background is that a group of hams in one of our county's towns is trying to get the attention of the town management, many of whom don't see a need for amateur radio support. In fact, they seem to have a rather passive attitude toward communications preparedness in general.

I've got any number of presentations but they are mostly about why you might want to get a ham license or details on specific emcomm tools, but nothing that's more marketing oriented.

Thanks and 73,
Steve KB1TCE

Gil Gibbs
 

Steve,

 If it's any comfort, I've been up against political walls, too. I live in an island city that has a constant influx & outflow of "residents", along with a now-huge mess of visitors. I was once active with ARES & RACES, to be a backup for "city communication", but the years went by with no huge storms.

Thus, the political scene was changing every year, ignorance is rampant, & anyone with experience is ignored! I gave up, am using my remanding years for my own hobbies.

All you can do is get in touch with the ARRL, inform them of the problem, & ask for help. Find out who is in charge of RACES, ARES, & local emergency "management", then hope for a favorable time.

Too many folks think of radio as "the CBers in town", thus that stain is still with us.

73's

Gil WA5YKK


On 7/27/2017 2:26 PM, Steve Hansen wrote:
Does anyone have a very basic amateur radio emcomm presentation that would be suitable for a small town's civil leadership? (Town council, police, fire.)

The background is that a group of hams in one of our county's towns is trying to get the attention of the town management, many of whom don't see a need for amateur radio support. In fact, they seem to have a rather passive attitude toward communications preparedness in general.

I've got any number of presentations but they are mostly about why you might want to get a ham license or details on specific emcomm tools, but nothing that's more marketing oriented.

Thanks and 73,
Steve KB1TCE

Steve Hansen
 

The interesting thing about this situation is that the county leadership is strongly pro-ham as are several of the towns. The county director can arm twist but only so far. Basically, the towns have to demonstrate some interest.

About 4 or 5 years ago we had a statewide exercise involving public safety and amateur radio resources. Our director asked all of the towns in the county if they wanted to also have a ham presence in the exercise. 6 towns out of 16 said yes. During the exercise we deployed at least one ham to each of those towns and the hams did radio checks along with everyone else and also relayed messages from civil authorities. It was a very simple exercise. In the aftermath, we got a FEMA grant to equip each of those towns with a complete station: VHF/UHF radio with packet/APRS (D710), SignaLink for NBEMS, Toughbook, power supply, cabling and a dual band antenna.

BTW, I'm the SEC for Maine and also in our local ARES-RACES group. Also handle all of the digital radiogram traffic into and out of Maine. The county is in very good shape comms wise but we have these little "pockets" that need to be worked.

73, Steve KB1TCE


On 07/27/2017 04:02 PM, Gil Gibbs wrote:

Steve,

 If it's any comfort, I've been up against political walls, too. I live in an island city that has a constant influx & outflow of "residents", along with a now-huge mess of visitors. I was once active with ARES & RACES, to be a backup for "city communication", but the years went by with no huge storms.

Thus, the political scene was changing every year, ignorance is rampant, & anyone with experience is ignored! I gave up, am using my remanding years for my own hobbies.

All you can do is get in touch with the ARRL, inform them of the problem, & ask for help. Find out who is in charge of RACES, ARES, & local emergency "management", then hope for a favorable time.

Too many folks think of radio as "the CBers in town", thus that stain is still with us.

73's

Gil WA5YKK


On 7/27/2017 2:26 PM, Steve Hansen wrote:
Does anyone have a very basic amateur radio emcomm presentation that would be suitable for a small town's civil leadership? (Town council, police, fire.)

The background is that a group of hams in one of our county's towns is trying to get the attention of the town management, many of whom don't see a need for amateur radio support. In fact, they seem to have a rather passive attitude toward communications preparedness in general.

I've got any number of presentations but they are mostly about why you might want to get a ham license or details on specific emcomm tools, but nothing that's more marketing oriented.

Thanks and 73,
Steve KB1TCE


W2TLJ
 

There are good presentations at the arrl. Do a search on emcomm presentation arrl and select the one that is basic enough.

On Jul 27, 2017 3:26 PM, "Steve Hansen" <shansen@...> wrote:
Does anyone have a very basic amateur radio emcomm presentation that would be suitable for a small town's civil leadership? (Town council, police, fire.)

The background is that a group of hams in one of our county's towns is trying to get the attention of the town management, many of whom don't see a need for amateur radio support. In fact, they seem to have a rather passive attitude toward communications preparedness in general.

I've got any number of presentations but they are mostly about why you might want to get a ham license or details on specific emcomm tools, but nothing that's more marketing oriented.

Thanks and 73,
Steve KB1TCE

Steve Hansen
 

One of the guys did a search of ARRL and didn't find anything that was relevant. I looked also - some good background info but not in presentation format.

73, Steve KB1TCE

On 07/27/2017 04:30 PM, W2TLJ wrote:
There are good presentations at the arrl. Do a search on emcomm presentation arrl and select the one that is basic enough.

On Jul 27, 2017 3:26 PM, "Steve Hansen" <shansen@...> wrote:
Does anyone have a very basic amateur radio emcomm presentation that would be suitable for a small town's civil leadership? (Town council, police, fire.)

The background is that a group of hams in one of our county's towns is trying to get the attention of the town management, many of whom don't see a need for amateur radio support. In fact, they seem to have a rather passive attitude toward communications preparedness in general.

I've got any number of presentations but they are mostly about why you might want to get a ham license or details on specific emcomm tools, but nothing that's more marketing oriented.

Thanks and 73,
Steve KB1TCE

Barry Porter
 

On Jul 27, 2017, at 4:36 PM, Steve Hansen <shansen@...> wrote:

One of the guys did a search of ARRL and didn't find anything that was relevant. I looked also - some good background info but not in presentation format.

73, Steve KB1TCE

On 07/27/2017 04:30 PM, W2TLJ wrote:
There are good presentations at the arrl. Do a search on emcomm presentation arrl and select the one that is basic enough.

On Jul 27, 2017 3:26 PM, "Steve Hansen" <shansen@...> wrote:
Does anyone have a very basic amateur radio emcomm presentation that would be suitable for a small town's civil leadership? (Town council, police, fire.)

The background is that a group of hams in one of our county's towns is trying to get the attention of the town management, many of whom don't see a need for amateur radio support. In fact, they seem to have a rather passive attitude toward communications preparedness in general.

I've got any number of presentations but they are mostly about why you might want to get a ham license or details on specific emcomm tools, but nothing that's more marketing oriented.

Thanks and 73,
Steve KB1TCE


Tim Reimers KA4LFP
 

That'd be a WONDERFUL thing to have --

Post to the group, if anyone has it.

Our EM is a ham, as are several other people in the professional first-responder world,
but you're right, our officials don't get it, and probably should see such a presentation...

Hopefully not too much of a "when all else fails" mindset -- 
Done incorrectly, that can be a turn-off and a slap-in-the-face to first-responder professionals who've built their entire careers and convinced the elected to give them millions in funding to be able to handle things.

We can certainly present ourselves as that "we cover the areas you're stretched thin for, as auxiliary communications links" , not "we can replace the professionals".
But that's a discussion that's been had many times...

73, Tim

On Thu, Jul 27, 2017 at 3:26 PM, Steve Hansen <shansen@...> wrote:
Does anyone have a very basic amateur radio emcomm presentation that would be suitable for a small town's civil leadership? (Town council, police, fire.)

The background is that a group of hams in one of our county's towns is trying to get the attention of the town management, many of whom don't see a need for amateur radio support. In fact, they seem to have a rather passive attitude toward communications preparedness in general.

I've got any number of presentations but they are mostly about why you might want to get a ham license or details on specific emcomm tools, but nothing that's more marketing oriented.

Thanks and 73,
Steve KB1TCE




--
Tim, KA4LFP
---
The world is in travail, and its agitation waxeth day by day. Its face is turned towards waywardness and unbelief....Its perversity will long continue. And when the appointed hour is come, there shall suddenly appear that which shall cause the limbs of mankind to quake. Then, and only then, will the Divine Standard be unfurled, and the Nightingale of Paradise warble its melody.
---
No trees were killed to send you this message, but a few trillion electrons were severely annoyed...
---
Morse code, the original digital mode
Real radios glow in the dark.
SWAN rule number 1: Life is too short to have a puny signal. © K0MHP
SWAN rule number 2: No menu required. © K0MHP



Steve Hansen
 

Thanks!...downloading it now. 

The warning was correct - it's a big file.

73, Steve



On 07/27/2017 04:41 PM, Barry Porter wrote:
try this page



On Jul 27, 2017, at 4:36 PM, Steve Hansen <shansen@...> wrote:

One of the guys did a search of ARRL and didn't find anything that was relevant. I looked also - some good background info but not in presentation format.

73, Steve KB1TCE

On 07/27/2017 04:30 PM, W2TLJ wrote:
There are good presentations at the arrl. Do a search on emcomm presentation arrl and select the one that is basic enough.

On Jul 27, 2017 3:26 PM, "Steve Hansen" <shansen@...> wrote:
Does anyone have a very basic amateur radio emcomm presentation that would be suitable for a small town's civil leadership? (Town council, police, fire.)

The background is that a group of hams in one of our county's towns is trying to get the attention of the town management, many of whom don't see a need for amateur radio support. In fact, they seem to have a rather passive attitude toward communications preparedness in general.

I've got any number of presentations but they are mostly about why you might want to get a ham license or details on specific emcomm tools, but nothing that's more marketing oriented.

Thanks and 73,
Steve KB1TCE



Steve Hansen
 

Looks like great fodder. Thanks for the link.

73, Steve KB1TCE


On 07/27/2017 04:41 PM, Barry Porter wrote:
try this page



On Jul 27, 2017, at 4:36 PM, Steve Hansen <shansen@...> wrote:

One of the guys did a search of ARRL and didn't find anything that was relevant. I looked also - some good background info but not in presentation format.

73, Steve KB1TCE

On 07/27/2017 04:30 PM, W2TLJ wrote:
There are good presentations at the arrl. Do a search on emcomm presentation arrl and select the one that is basic enough.

On Jul 27, 2017 3:26 PM, "Steve Hansen" <shansen@...> wrote:
Does anyone have a very basic amateur radio emcomm presentation that would be suitable for a small town's civil leadership? (Town council, police, fire.)

The background is that a group of hams in one of our county's towns is trying to get the attention of the town management, many of whom don't see a need for amateur radio support. In fact, they seem to have a rather passive attitude toward communications preparedness in general.

I've got any number of presentations but they are mostly about why you might want to get a ham license or details on specific emcomm tools, but nothing that's more marketing oriented.

Thanks and 73,
Steve KB1TCE



Don Vary
 

Steve,

   Don't know if this would help.  Was one I got from Portage Co, and you can modify it for your use


73

Don KD0HHN


Donald Vary, KD0HHN
Emergency Coordinator - Marion County MO
ARES®  Missouri Section
Amateur Radio Emergency Service®
NTS Digital Relay Station Central Area
PH# 573-221-8205
email: kd0hhn@...




WA8JXM
 

On 7/27/17 3:26 PM, Steve Hansen wrote:
The background is that a group of hams in one of our county's towns is trying to get the attention of the town management, many of whom don't see a need for amateur radio support. In fact, they seem to have a rather passive attitude toward communications preparedness in general.
I think many officials would rather live with a problem they understand rather than rely on solutions they do not understand or control.

Many years ago (42 to be exact) I was RACES RO and a volunteer firefighter/EMT. I mentioned to my fire chief that in any large area disaster I had county responsibilities. His response was that I needed to make my choice. That's when I pretty much got out of ham radio and MARS for many years.

A fire chief knows how to run his department. Dealing with other organizations and people in the middle is usually a distraction and many will find it more effective to just concentrate on the task in front of them. When resources are stretched, communications is not the main issue, trained personnel and equipment is the issue.

I am just trying to give some perspective from the other side.

73, Ken WA8JXM

BERNARD DUBB
 

Hi Steve,

I just searched on "ARRL Emcom presentation" and got this:

http://www.arrl.org/emcomm-campaign

73,
Bernie KB1DGY
CT ARES Region 4N, NCO/NCS

Tim Reimers KA4LFP
 

That's kind of what and how I've seen some EM responders react.
In a crisis, the last thing they want is a new group of helpers showing up wanting to work the scene or be involved.

This is why it's critical to have a relationship with the county EM and have some pre-planned knowledge of where and how amateur radio fits in.

Otherwise that's exactly what we can be perceived as doing - Trying to horn in on a well oiled and trained machine that counts on fully understanding what resources they have, even to knowing personalities and foibles and knowing who to put where because of who can work together well and which two people not to put in the same room.

Suddenly adding a whole bunch of unknown quantities of amateur operators to that machine can make a personality-aware Fire/EMS/other incident commander go crazy, especially if the implied attitude from the ham is that "you need my help you just don't know it".
 That's why connections from higher up that are organized and planned and roles understood are so key.
 and it might quite possibly be that hams are not at the center of things and are comms for less key areas.



I have made it very clear to my employer (municipal IT) that my first duty lies with my day job of supporting IT infrastructure for fire and police, NOT going off to play radio. But, equally, that if i am not needed locally and have vacation days, I may go assist in a disaster elsewhere. I don't want my employer to go with that same line of "choose where you work, there or here".

73, Tim




_____________________

“Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character give him power.” - Abraham Lincoln

   

On Jul 27, 2017 9:57 PM, "WA8JXM" <wa8jxm@...> wrote:
On 7/27/17 3:26 PM, Steve Hansen wrote:
The background is that a group of hams in one of our county's towns is trying to get the attention of the town management, many of whom don't see a need for amateur radio support. In fact, they seem to have a rather passive attitude toward communications preparedness in general.

I think many officials would rather live with a problem they understand rather than rely on solutions they do not understand or control.

Many years ago (42 to be exact) I was RACES RO and a volunteer firefighter/EMT.   I mentioned to my fire chief that in any large area disaster I had county responsibilities.  His response was that I needed to make my choice.   That's when I pretty much got out of ham radio and MARS for many years.

A fire chief knows how to run his department.   Dealing with other organizations and people in the middle is usually  a distraction and many will find it more effective to just concentrate on the task in front of them.  When resources are stretched, communications is not the main issue, trained personnel and equipment is the issue.

I am just trying to give some perspective from the other side.

73, Ken WA8JXM





Randy McGill
 

Hi, I encourage your effort to reach out directly to your city/county government.  One of the things that I think ARES has forgotten is that we are a "public service" entity.  IMHO ARES has aligned it's function too narrowly, in that we consider it to be an auxiliary arm of governmental agencies.  ARES can serve any legitimate public service agency whether it be city, county, federal or non governmental organization providing that we don't interfere with ongoing public service communications and stay in our lane. 

N7WWA


"Never debate with an idiot.  They only drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience."



From: nbems@groups.io <nbems@groups.io> on behalf of Tim Reimers KA4LFP <treimers95@...>
Sent: Friday, July 28, 2017 7:16 AM
To: nbems@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nbems] Basic Ham Emcomm Presentation for Town Leadership
 
That's kind of what and how I've seen some EM responders react.
In a crisis, the last thing they want is a new group of helpers showing up wanting to work the scene or be involved.

This is why it's critical to have a relationship with the county EM and have some pre-planned knowledge of where and how amateur radio fits in.

Otherwise that's exactly what we can be perceived as doing - Trying to horn in on a well oiled and trained machine that counts on fully understanding what resources they have, even to knowing personalities and foibles and knowing who to put where because of who can work together well and which two people not to put in the same room.

Suddenly adding a whole bunch of unknown quantities of amateur operators to that machine can make a personality-aware Fire/EMS/other incident commander go crazy, especially if the implied attitude from the ham is that "you need my help you just don't know it".
 That's why connections from higher up that are organized and planned and roles understood are so key.
 and it might quite possibly be that hams are not at the center of things and are comms for less key areas.



I have made it very clear to my employer (municipal IT) that my first duty lies with my day job of supporting IT infrastructure for fire and police, NOT going off to play radio. But, equally, that if i am not needed locally and have vacation days, I may go assist in a disaster elsewhere. I don't want my employer to go with that same line of "choose where you work, there or here".

73, Tim




_____________________

“Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character give him power.” - Abraham Lincoln

   

On Jul 27, 2017 9:57 PM, "WA8JXM" <wa8jxm@...> wrote:
On 7/27/17 3:26 PM, Steve Hansen wrote:
The background is that a group of hams in one of our county's towns is trying to get the attention of the town management, many of whom don't see a need for amateur radio support. In fact, they seem to have a rather passive attitude toward communications preparedness in general.

I think many officials would rather live with a problem they understand rather than rely on solutions they do not understand or control.

Many years ago (42 to be exact) I was RACES RO and a volunteer firefighter/EMT.   I mentioned to my fire chief that in any large area disaster I had county responsibilities.  His response was that I needed to make my choice.   That's when I pretty much got out of ham radio and MARS for many years.

A fire chief knows how to run his department.   Dealing with other organizations and people in the middle is usually  a distraction and many will find it more effective to just concentrate on the task in front of them.  When resources are stretched, communications is not the main issue, trained personnel and equipment is the issue.

I am just trying to give some perspective from the other side.

73, Ken WA8JXM





Al Massaro
 

Steve Hansen
 

First off, thanks to everyone who has submitted materials either through this forum or direct. I think we have enough fodder.


Our team is ARES/RACES-CERT and we have quarterly exercises with the county plus statewide exercises and a bunch of community service events (bike rides, charity walks and swims, etc.).


I spoke with the county director this AM. He verified that the town in question has not previously participated in any county-wide exercises nor are they yet NIMS compliant. So they've got some work to do aside from any amateur involvement. The town is also one of the more affluent ones in the county.


We have similar issues with several of the island communities. Their comms infrastructure is fragile anyway.


73, Steve KB1TCE



On 07/28/2017 11:08 AM, Randy McGill wrote:

Hi, I encourage your effort to reach out directly to your city/county government.  One of the things that I think ARES has forgotten is that we are a "public service" entity.  IMHO ARES has aligned it's function too narrowly, in that we consider it to be an auxiliary arm of governmental agencies.  ARES can serve any legitimate public service agency whether it be city, county, federal or non governmental organization providing that we don't interfere with ongoing public service communications and stay in our lane. 

N7WWA


"Never debate with an idiot.  They only drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience."



From: nbems@groups.io <nbems@groups.io> on behalf of Tim Reimers KA4LFP <treimers95@...>
Sent: Friday, July 28, 2017 7:16 AM
To: nbems@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nbems] Basic Ham Emcomm Presentation for Town Leadership
 
That's kind of what and how I've seen some EM responders react.
In a crisis, the last thing they want is a new group of helpers showing up wanting to work the scene or be involved.

This is why it's critical to have a relationship with the county EM and have some pre-planned knowledge of where and how amateur radio fits in.

Otherwise that's exactly what we can be perceived as doing - Trying to horn in on a well oiled and trained machine that counts on fully understanding what resources they have, even to knowing personalities and foibles and knowing who to put where because of who can work together well and which two people not to put in the same room.

Suddenly adding a whole bunch of unknown quantities of amateur operators to that machine can make a personality-aware Fire/EMS/other incident commander go crazy, especially if the implied attitude from the ham is that "you need my help you just don't know it".
 That's why connections from higher up that are organized and planned and roles understood are so key.
 and it might quite possibly be that hams are not at the center of things and are comms for less key areas.



I have made it very clear to my employer (municipal IT) that my first duty lies with my day job of supporting IT infrastructure for fire and police, NOT going off to play radio. But, equally, that if i am not needed locally and have vacation days, I may go assist in a disaster elsewhere. I don't want my employer to go with that same line of "choose where you work, there or here".

73, Tim




_____________________

“Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character give him power.” - Abraham Lincoln

   

On Jul 27, 2017 9:57 PM, "WA8JXM" <wa8jxm@...> wrote:
On 7/27/17 3:26 PM, Steve Hansen wrote:
The background is that a group of hams in one of our county's towns is trying to get the attention of the town management, many of whom don't see a need for amateur radio support. In fact, they seem to have a rather passive attitude toward communications preparedness in general.

I think many officials would rather live with a problem they understand rather than rely on solutions they do not understand or control.

Many years ago (42 to be exact) I was RACES RO and a volunteer firefighter/EMT.   I mentioned to my fire chief that in any large area disaster I had county responsibilities.  His response was that I needed to make my choice.   That's when I pretty much got out of ham radio and MARS for many years.

A fire chief knows how to run his department.   Dealing with other organizations and people in the middle is usually  a distraction and many will find it more effective to just concentrate on the task in front of them.  When resources are stretched, communications is not the main issue, trained personnel and equipment is the issue.

I am just trying to give some perspective from the other side.

73, Ken WA8JXM






Dave Harr <martaban@...>
 

One last thing . . .  your initial post asked about materials for presentation.


Rather than starting from hams trying to be convince officials of our usefulness, sometimes the perspective of a professional is more convincing.  I found these presentations of various lengths, by recent FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate to be interesting and useful.  They are of different length, so probably for different audiences.  Just a couple of additional arrows for your quiver.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VC6G4spjQ7w


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUbmxOooEYI


And a longer one, on Ham Radio Now, after he left office in which he ranges a bit further afield looking into the


http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2017/february/former-fema-fugate-on-ham-radio-now.htm


I love his quote "If you have the luxury of being exclusionary, it's probably not a bad disaster!"  There may be some other nuggets in here you can use.


Regards, es 73


Dave Harr

KF9IO

On July 28, 2017 at 10:48 AM Steve Hansen <shansen@...> wrote:

First off, thanks to everyone who has submitted materials either through this forum or direct. I think we have enough fodder.


Our team is ARES/RACES-CERT and we have quarterly exercises with the county plus statewide exercises and a bunch of community service events (bike rides, charity walks and swims, etc.).


I spoke with the county director this AM. He verified that the town in question has not previously participated in any county-wide exercises nor are they yet NIMS compliant. So they've got some work to do aside from any amateur involvement. The town is also one of the more affluent ones in the county.


We have similar issues with several of the island communities. Their comms infrastructure is fragile anyway.


73, Steve KB1TCE



On 07/28/2017 11:08 AM, Randy McGill wrote:

Hi, I encourage your effort to reach out directly to your city/county government.  One of the things that I think ARES has forgotten is that we are a "public service" entity.  IMHO ARES has aligned it's function too narrowly, in that we consider it to be an auxiliary arm of governmental agencies.  ARES can serve any legitimate public service agency whether it be city, county, federal or non governmental organization providing that we don't interfere with ongoing public service communications and stay in our lane. 

N7WWA


"Never debate with an idiot.  They only drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience."



From: nbems@groups.io <nbems@groups.io> on behalf of Tim Reimers KA4LFP <treimers95@...>
Sent: Friday, July 28, 2017 7:16 AM
To: nbems@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nbems] Basic Ham Emcomm Presentation for Town Leadership
 
That's kind of what and how I've seen some EM responders react.
In a crisis, the last thing they want is a new group of helpers showing up wanting to work the scene or be involved.

This is why it's critical to have a relationship with the county EM and have some pre-planned knowledge of where and how amateur radio fits in.

Otherwise that's exactly what we can be perceived as doing - Trying to horn in on a well oiled and trained machine that counts on fully understanding what resources they have, even to knowing personalities and foibles and knowing who to put where because of who can work together well and which two people not to put in the same room.

Suddenly adding a whole bunch of unknown quantities of amateur operators to that machine can make a personality-aware Fire/EMS/other incident commander go crazy, especially if the implied attitude from the ham is that "you need my help you just don't know it".
 That's why connections from higher up that are organized and planned and roles understood are so key.
 and it might quite possibly be that hams are not at the center of things and are comms for less key areas.



I have made it very clear to my employer (municipal IT) that my first duty lies with my day job of supporting IT infrastructure for fire and police, NOT going off to play radio. But, equally, that if i am not needed locally and have vacation days, I may go assist in a disaster elsewhere. I don't want my employer to go with that same line of "choose where you work, there or here".

73, Tim




_____________________

“Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character give him power.” - Abraham Lincoln

   

On Jul 27, 2017 9:57 PM, "WA8JXM" <wa8jxm@...> wrote:
On 7/27/17 3:26 PM, Steve Hansen wrote:
The background is that a group of hams in one of our county's towns is trying to get the attention of the town management, many of whom don't see a need for amateur radio support. In fact, they seem to have a rather passive attitude toward communications preparedness in general.

I think many officials would rather live with a problem they understand rather than rely on solutions they do not understand or control.

Many years ago (42 to be exact) I was RACES RO and a volunteer firefighter/EMT.   I mentioned to my fire chief that in any large area disaster I had county responsibilities.  His response was that I needed to make my choice.   That's when I pretty much got out of ham radio and MARS for many years.

A fire chief knows how to run his department.   Dealing with other organizations and people in the middle is usually  a distraction and many will find it more effective to just concentrate on the task in front of them.  When resources are stretched, communications is not the main issue, trained personnel and equipment is the issue.

I am just trying to give some perspective from the other side.

73, Ken WA8JXM







 

Dave Harr <martaban@...>
 

On July 28, 2017 at 11:14 AM Dave Harr <martaban@...> wrote:

One last thing . . .  your initial post asked about materials for presentation.


Rather than starting from hams trying to be convince officials of our usefulness, sometimes the perspective of a professional is more convincing.  I found these presentations of various lengths, by recent FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate to be interesting and useful.  They are of different length, so probably for different audiences.  Just a couple of additional arrows for your quiver.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VC6G4spjQ7w


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VUbmxOooEYI


And a longer one, on Ham Radio Now, after he left office in which he ranges a bit further afield looking into the


http://www.southgatearc.org/news/2017/february/former-fema-fugate-on-ham-radio-now.htm


I love his quote "If you have the luxury of being exclusionary, it's probably not a bad disaster!"  There may be some other nuggets in here you can use.


Regards, es 73


Dave Harr

KF9IO

On July 28, 2017 at 10:48 AM Steve Hansen <shansen@...> wrote:

First off, thanks to everyone who has submitted materials either through this forum or direct. I think we have enough fodder.


Our team is ARES/RACES-CERT and we have quarterly exercises with the county plus statewide exercises and a bunch of community service events (bike rides, charity walks and swims, etc.).


I spoke with the county director this AM. He verified that the town in question has not previously participated in any county-wide exercises nor are they yet NIMS compliant. So they've got some work to do aside from any amateur involvement. The town is also one of the more affluent ones in the county.


We have similar issues with several of the island communities. Their comms infrastructure is fragile anyway.


73, Steve KB1TCE



On 07/28/2017 11:08 AM, Randy McGill wrote:

Hi, I encourage your effort to reach out directly to your city/county government.  One of the things that I think ARES has forgotten is that we are a "public service" entity.  IMHO ARES has aligned it's function too narrowly, in that we consider it to be an auxiliary arm of governmental agencies.  ARES can serve any legitimate public service agency whether it be city, county, federal or non governmental organization providing that we don't interfere with ongoing public service communications and stay in our lane. 

N7WWA


"Never debate with an idiot.  They only drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience."



From: nbems@groups.io <nbems@groups.io> on behalf of Tim Reimers KA4LFP <treimers95@...>
Sent: Friday, July 28, 2017 7:16 AM
To: nbems@groups.io
Subject: Re: [nbems] Basic Ham Emcomm Presentation for Town Leadership
 
That's kind of what and how I've seen some EM responders react.
In a crisis, the last thing they want is a new group of helpers showing up wanting to work the scene or be involved.

This is why it's critical to have a relationship with the county EM and have some pre-planned knowledge of where and how amateur radio fits in.

Otherwise that's exactly what we can be perceived as doing - Trying to horn in on a well oiled and trained machine that counts on fully understanding what resources they have, even to knowing personalities and foibles and knowing who to put where because of who can work together well and which two people not to put in the same room.

Suddenly adding a whole bunch of unknown quantities of amateur operators to that machine can make a personality-aware Fire/EMS/other incident commander go crazy, especially if the implied attitude from the ham is that "you need my help you just don't know it".
 That's why connections from higher up that are organized and planned and roles understood are so key.
 and it might quite possibly be that hams are not at the center of things and are comms for less key areas.



I have made it very clear to my employer (municipal IT) that my first duty lies with my day job of supporting IT infrastructure for fire and police, NOT going off to play radio. But, equally, that if i am not needed locally and have vacation days, I may go assist in a disaster elsewhere. I don't want my employer to go with that same line of "choose where you work, there or here".

73, Tim




_____________________

“Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man’s character give him power.” - Abraham Lincoln

   

On Jul 27, 2017 9:57 PM, "WA8JXM" <wa8jxm@...> wrote:
On 7/27/17 3:26 PM, Steve Hansen wrote:
The background is that a group of hams in one of our county's towns is trying to get the attention of the town management, many of whom don't see a need for amateur radio support. In fact, they seem to have a rather passive attitude toward communications preparedness in general.

I think many officials would rather live with a problem they understand rather than rely on solutions they do not understand or control.

Many years ago (42 to be exact) I was RACES RO and a volunteer firefighter/EMT.   I mentioned to my fire chief that in any large area disaster I had county responsibilities.  His response was that I needed to make my choice.   That's when I pretty much got out of ham radio and MARS for many years.

A fire chief knows how to run his department.   Dealing with other organizations and people in the middle is usually  a distraction and many will find it more effective to just concentrate on the task in front of them.  When resources are stretched, communications is not the main issue, trained personnel and equipment is the issue.

I am just trying to give some perspective from the other side.

73, Ken WA8JXM







 


 

Steve Hansen
 

For those of you who might be interested in what we're doing in Maine,
the Maine ARES web site is at http://maine-ares.org/

This site is about a year old and replaces a legacy site that was
abandoned a goodly number of years ago. I pick at it as time permits but
the basics are there. The big project for the next few months is to
update the old (2010) comms plan which is quite long in the tooth.

There are some message exercises that are intended to be accomplished by
individuals. These are linked from the top of the home page. There's a
fair amount on flmsg including this page:
http://maine-ares.org/digital_flmsg.htm

Direct link to a presentation on flmsg custom forms given at the Maine
Partners in Emergency Preparedness (April 2017) is here:
http://www.maine.gov/tools/whatsnew/attach.php?id=754879&an=3 This
covers the origins of the "Agency" GUI, the Red Cross forms and moving
flmsg files though a wifi network as attachments to instant messages.

The Traffic page includes the latest documentation from Radio Relay
International.

A lot of the info and links received on this thread will be used to
expand the content.

73, Steve KB1TCE