nVNA-H4 v4.3_MS, firmware 1.1, Menu Items & Descriptions 0101.pdf


Rich NE1EE
 

I have started to document the menu structure, because on my last project, which I will post here, I had so many questions, and some confusion about what did what.

I'd appreciate any comments about any item. I will include comments regularly. I will post the result in a public place. We have a files place on this list, yes? I can put it there. Expect fairly frequent updates at first.

~R~
72/73 de Rich NE1EE
The Dusty Key
On the banks of the Piscataqua


Charlie N2MHS <ucfargis1@...>
 

so thats the name of that river we cross when going to and fro Bah Hahbor on 95

On Friday, April 22, 2022, 08:58:23 AM EDT, Rich NE1EE <thedustykey@...> wrote:

I have started to document the menu structure, because on my last project, which I will post here, I had so many questions, and some confusion about what did what.

I'd appreciate any comments about any item. I will include comments regularly. I will post the result in a public place. We have a files place on this list, yes? I can put it there. Expect fairly frequent updates at first.

~R~
72/73 de Rich NE1EE
The Dusty Key
On the banks of the Piscataqua


Rich NE1EE
 

On 2022-04-23 12:55:+0000, you wrote:
so thats the name of that river we cross when going to and fro Bah Hahbor on 95
Ayuh...I grew up down east, and have fond memories of my grandma telling stories. We lived near a native tribe, and visited often. I have a backpack woven by the chief. We didn't have electricity until I was 10, and I attended a 2-room schoolhouse. It was actually pretty nice for what it was. I didn't know any better, so I thought I was well off <grin> I still think so ;-) I put it in my sig to preserve the historical value.

Most folks don't know why it's called down east, but grandma did.

There is some discussion about how to pronounce Piscataqua. I've always been in favor of pronouncing words in their native tongue, to the degree that I am capable. We tend to Anglicize everything we come across.

In his early research in the 1920s, Ralph May wrote to the respected Indian language expert and folklorist Fanny Eckstorm in Canada. She didn’t respond until 1929, three years after May’s history of Portsmouth was published. There was no proper way of spelling “Piscataqua” she told him in her letters. All of the spellings, read aloud, would have been recognized as proper by an Indian listener.

"Peske", she said, means "branch", and "tegwe" is a river with a strong current, possibly tidal. Piscataqua, or “peske-tegwe” to an Abenaki speaker, would likely mean the portion of the river between Great Bay and the sea.

Eckstorm based her research, not on English-language books, but by traveling on rivers with Native-speaking guides. She asked questions, listened to the sound of words, and tried to relate the sounds to the land itself and its importance to Native peoples.

~R~
72/73 de Rich NE1EE
The Dusty Key
On the banks of the Piscataqua


Fleet KC1QHE <black6host@...>
 

Thanks for the short lesson!  I don't live far from that area, next time I go I'll pay a bit better attention!

73 Fleet KC1QHE

On 4/23/2022 12:49 PM, Rich NE1EE wrote:
On 2022-04-23 12:55:+0000, you wrote:
so thats the name of that river we cross when going to and fro Bah Hahbor on 95
Ayuh...I grew up down east, and have fond memories of my grandma telling stories. We lived near a native tribe, and visited often. I have a backpack woven by the chief. We didn't have electricity until I was 10, and I attended a 2-room schoolhouse. It was actually pretty nice for what it was. I didn't know any better, so I thought I was well off <grin> I still think so ;-) I put it in my sig to preserve the historical value.

Most folks don't know why it's called down east, but grandma did.

There is some discussion about how to pronounce Piscataqua. I've always been in favor of pronouncing words in their native tongue, to the degree that I am capable. We tend to Anglicize everything we come across.

In his early research in the 1920s, Ralph May wrote to the respected Indian language expert and folklorist Fanny Eckstorm in Canada. She didn�t respond until 1929, three years after May�s history of Portsmouth was published. There was no proper way of spelling �Piscataqua� she told him in her letters. All of the spellings, read aloud, would have been recognized as proper by an Indian listener.

"Peske", she said, means "branch", and "tegwe" is a river with a strong current, possibly tidal. Piscataqua, or �peske-tegwe� to an Abenaki speaker, would likely mean the portion of the river between Great Bay and the sea.

Eckstorm based her research, not on English-language books, but by traveling on rivers with Native-speaking guides. She asked questions, listened to the sound of words, and tried to relate the sounds to the land itself and its importance to Native peoples.

~R~
72/73 de Rich NE1EE
The Dusty Key
On the banks of the Piscataqua


Bill Mader, K8TE
 

I agree with and commend you for your approach to pronouncing words in their native tongue, Rich. I find that appropriate and respective. As a formerly fluent Spanish speaker, I cringe when local TV news pronouncers disregard the "e" at the end of Rio Grande. Worse yet, some will say Rio Grande River which boldly proclaims their ignorance of what Rio means (river). I think it's the result of the "Ready, aim, fire" syndrome in which thinking about what one is to say/read is left out of the equation. ATM machine is the typical example in our own vernacular. Add "roger that" and similar misuse of ham radio lingo to the mix and it's no wonder I often skip listening to local nets.

Now I'll get back to reading about my VNA analyzer (pun intended).

--
73, Bill, K8TE
ARRL SM New Mexico


Gregg Messenger VE6WGM
 

Will be looking forward to seeing your work Rich :-)

Regards,
Gregg
--
VE6WGM