Topics

USB cable

Bob Albert
 

I need a replacement cable to go from the nanoVNA to the USB port. Any links, specs, or other help?

Bob

John Gord
 

Bob,
I think most NanoVNA units use a type C USB connector. Some may be Micro USB. Our local 99-cent-only store often carries both types.
--John Gord

On Mon, Nov 25, 2019 at 09:50 PM, Bob Albert wrote:


I need a replacement cable to go from the nanoVNA to the USB port. Any links,
specs, or other help?

Bob

Joe St. Clair AF5MH
 

I have also used a regular microUSB cable with an inexpensive microUSB to USB Type -C converter. Worked okay.

vbifyz
 

My unit has a problem with both the supplied cable and the connector itself. With the supplied USB-C cable it almost never connects to the PC, but charging is ok.
With a better quality cables it connects about 50% of the time (in both orientations), and loses connection easily if I move it around.
Answering the original question: The cable to search is "USB Type-C to USB-A 2.0 Male". Don't buy the cheapest ones. You don't need more expensive high speed 3.0 cables either.

Bob Albert
 

Will this work?
Wholesale USB 2.0 USB-C Type C Male To Female USB A Adapter OTG Data Sync Cable | eBay

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Wholesale USB 2.0 USB-C Type C Male To Female USB A Adapter OTG Data Syn...

USB3.1 Type-C male to USB3.0 female OTG data cable for Google Pixel C,for Nokia. With OTG Data function. 1 x USB...
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On Tuesday, November 26, 2019, 10:36:00 AM PST, vbifyz <3ym3ym@...> wrote:

My unit has a problem with both the supplied cable and the connector itself. With the supplied USB-C cable it almost never connects to the PC, but charging is ok.
With a better quality cables it connects about 50% of the time (in both orientations), and loses connection easily if I move it around.
Answering the original question: The cable to search is "USB Type-C to USB-A 2.0 Male". Don't buy the cheapest ones. You don't need more expensive high speed 3.0 cables either.

Bob Albert
 

I have a problem that the 5V input to the vna is shorted.   I cannot charge the battery.  So I tried charging the battery from a power supply and all works ok.
I opened the unit and unsoldered the connector, USB.  I tested and the connector is not shorted.
Now I find the vna no longer accepts power.  Perhaps there is a jumper inside the connector I removed.
This connector is so small I don't see how to reinstall it.
The schematic diagram of the VNA shows no USB connector that I can find so that I can manage to operate the unit.  I would not care if it uses this connector; I can put something else on, and sacrifice the communication port feature.
Can someone explain where to apply 5V so as to get the unit operational again?  There are many pins to this connector, more than I thought would be needed to function.  If I knew which pads to connect to external 5V I could do that and it would be sufficient for my needs.
Bob

On Tuesday, November 26, 2019, 10:59:17 AM PST, Bob Albert via Groups.Io <bob91343=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Will this work?
Wholesale USB 2.0 USB-C Type C Male To Female USB A Adapter OTG Data Sync Cable | eBay

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|
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| $1.10 |  |

|

|
|
|  |
Wholesale USB 2.0 USB-C Type C Male To Female USB A Adapter OTG Data Syn...

USB3.1 Type-C male to USB3.0 female OTG data cable for Google Pixel C,for Nokia. With OTG Data function. 1 x USB...
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    On Tuesday, November 26, 2019, 10:36:00 AM PST, vbifyz <3ym3ym@...> wrote: 

My unit has a problem with both the supplied cable and the connector itself. With the supplied USB-C cable it almost never connects to the PC, but charging is ok.
With a better quality cables it connects about 50% of the time (in both orientations), and loses connection easily if I move it around.
Answering the original question: The cable to search is "USB Type-C to USB-A 2.0 Male". Don't buy the cheapest ones. You don't need more expensive high speed 3.0 cables either.

Gyula Molnar
 

Hi Bob

Based on your description, you should read on "NanoVNA does not want to start-solved", I hope that what you have written there will help you.
Use the "Search" window.

73, Gyula HA3HZ

erik@...
 

Simplest is to connect 5 volt to the "OFF" position of the power switch. Easy to solder at the side of the PCB
Now you can switch the nanoVNA on by switching it on

--
NanoVNA Wiki: https://groups.io/g/nanovna-users/wiki/home
NanoVNA Files: https://groups.io/g/nanovna-users/files
Erik, PD0EK

Bob Albert
 

Erik,With the battery disconnected I connected 3.7 V to the off position of the power switch and it works.
If I raise it to 5V and connect the battery, will it charge and operate on battery?  I would like to restore normal battery charge and operation.
Bob

On Thursday, December 5, 2019, 01:14:38 AM PST, <erik@...> wrote:

Simplest is to connect 5 volt to the "OFF" position of the power switch. Easy to solder at the side of the PCB
Now you can switch the nanoVNA on by switching it on

--
NanoVNA Wiki: https://groups.io/g/nanovna-users/wiki/home
NanoVNA Files: https://groups.io/g/nanovna-users/files
Erik, PD0EK

Larry Rothman
 

Bob -

Please DO NOT apply 5 volts to the device if you have the battery connected directly to the power switch!!

You WILL end up with a battery fire.

The only reason the unit is working is because there is a low drop out regulator that is converting that 3.7 volts down to 3.3 volts.

HOWEVER - your SA612 mixers are no longer getting the 5 volts they need to operate with and your readings will not be accurate.

The 5v at the USB socket drives the charger/inverter chip that simultaneously charges the battery and provides 5 volts to the power switch to run the Nano.

I've used an existing forum photo and added the spot (red) where you can manually connect +5V to R40 at Pin 1 of the IP5303 chip.
But first, put the battery back where is is supposed to be connected.

you can use a barrel jack and a 5V wall adapter and you're good to go.

Bob Albert
 

Larry, that is exactly the information I was seeking.  Now I can restore 'normal' operation, less the data exchange.
I did connect 5V to the switch because 3.7 wasn't enough for the unit to run.  We shall see how it goes.
I do intend to use an external 7805 to run the unit from a 13V source, and have it sort of permanently attached to my ham station.  I still have the other one that works fine and it will do for portable uses.
Off to the workbench...
Bob

On Thursday, December 5, 2019, 11:05:08 AM PST, Larry Rothman <@ve3lri> wrote:

Bob -

Please DO NOT apply 5 volts to the device if you have the battery connected directly to the power switch!!

You WILL end up with a battery fire.

The only reason the unit is working is because there is a low drop out regulator that is converting that 3.7 volts down to 3.3 volts.

HOWEVER - your SA612 mixers are no longer getting the 5 volts they need to operate with and your readings will not be accurate.

The 5v at the USB socket drives the charger/inverter chip that simultaneously charges the battery and provides 5 volts to the power switch to run the Nano.

I've used an existing forum photo and added the spot (red) where you can manually connect +5V to R40 at Pin 1 of the IP5303 chip.
But first, put the battery back where is is supposed to be connected.

you can use a barrel jack and a 5V wall adapter and you're good to go.

Bob Albert
 

Okay I tried it and it looks perfect.  I found a 7805 and will find a spot for it and energize this thing from a higher voltage.
However, the circuit seems to draw the better part of 1 Ampere so running it from 13 V would dissipate 8 Watts, too much for the little regulator.  So I have to ponder alternatives, either a pass transistor or just running it from a separate 5V source as you recommend.  There is no shortage of USB wall supplies although the proper connector is another story.
Bob

On Thursday, December 5, 2019, 11:05:08 AM PST, Larry Rothman <@ve3lri> wrote:

Bob -

Please DO NOT apply 5 volts to the device if you have the battery connected directly to the power switch!!

You WILL end up with a battery fire.

The only reason the unit is working is because there is a low drop out regulator that is converting that 3.7 volts down to 3.3 volts.

HOWEVER - your SA612 mixers are no longer getting the 5 volts they need to operate with and your readings will not be accurate.

The 5v at the USB socket drives the charger/inverter chip that simultaneously charges the battery and provides 5 volts to the power switch to run the Nano.

I've used an existing forum photo and added the spot (red) where you can manually connect +5V to R40 at Pin 1 of the IP5303 chip.
But first, put the battery back where is is supposed to be connected.

you can use a barrel jack and a 5V wall adapter and you're good to go.

Larry Rothman
 

Good to know, Bob. 
I had suggested to the devs to use 2 LiPo s with a linear 5v Reg to run the unit in order to reduce RFI from that charger/inverter chip. 
Banggood has a 2S charging board for about $2 that you run off of an 8 to 12v source.  I'm going to look at that setup soon in addition to modding the bridge and freq source circuits per the discussion on Hugen's GitHub repo. 
CheersLarry



On Thu, 5 Dec 2019 at 5:03 PM, Bob Albert via Groups.Io<bob91343=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote: Larry, that is exactly the information I was seeking.  Now I can restore 'normal' operation, less the data exchange.
I did connect 5V to the switch because 3.7 wasn't enough for the unit to run.  We shall see how it goes.
I do intend to use an external 7805 to run the unit from a 13V source, and have it sort of permanently attached to my ham station.  I still have the other one that works fine and it will do for portable uses.
Off to the workbench...
Bob

On Thursday, December 5, 2019, 11:05:08 AM PST, Larry Rothman <@ve3lri> wrote:

Bob -

Please DO NOT apply 5 volts to the device if you have the battery connected directly to the power switch!!

You WILL end up with a battery fire.

The only reason the unit is working is because there is a low drop out regulator that is converting that 3.7 volts down to 3.3 volts.

HOWEVER - your SA612 mixers are no longer getting the 5 volts they need to operate with and your readings will not be accurate.

The 5v at the USB socket drives the charger/inverter chip that simultaneously charges the battery and provides 5 volts to the power switch to run the Nano.

I've used an existing forum photo and added the spot (red) where you can manually connect +5V to R40 at Pin 1 of the IP5303 chip.
But first, put the battery back where is is supposed to be connected.

you can use a barrel jack and a 5V wall adapter and you're good to go.

Larry Rothman
 

Nah, don't use a usb 5v wall wart.  Get one with a small barrel plug and stick a socket on the Nano. Check around your junk box for the parts. 



On Thu, 5 Dec 2019 at 5:36 PM, Bob Albert via Groups.Io<bob91343=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote: Okay I tried it and it looks perfect.  I found a 7805 and will find a spot for it and energize this thing from a higher voltage.
However, the circuit seems to draw the better part of 1 Ampere so running it from 13 V would dissipate 8 Watts, too much for the little regulator.  So I have to ponder alternatives, either a pass transistor or just running it from a separate 5V source as you recommend.  There is no shortage of USB wall supplies although the proper connector is another story.
Bob

On Thursday, December 5, 2019, 11:05:08 AM PST, Larry Rothman <@ve3lri> wrote:

Bob -

Please DO NOT apply 5 volts to the device if you have the battery connected directly to the power switch!!

You WILL end up with a battery fire.

The only reason the unit is working is because there is a low drop out regulator that is converting that 3.7 volts down to 3.3 volts.

HOWEVER - your SA612 mixers are no longer getting the 5 volts they need to operate with and your readings will not be accurate.

The 5v at the USB socket drives the charger/inverter chip that simultaneously charges the battery and provides 5 volts to the power switch to run the Nano.

I've used an existing forum photo and added the spot (red) where you can manually connect +5V to R40 at Pin 1 of the IP5303 chip.
But first, put the battery back where is is supposed to be connected.

you can use a barrel jack and a 5V wall adapter and you're good to go.

hwalker
 

Bob,
Any idea what caused the short at the connector? Usually the USB-C connectors are not easy to misalign so I was curious as to what you thought might have occurred.

- Herb

Bob Albert
 

Herb, no idea of the short.  In fact the removed connector seems to have disappeared.  If I could find it (I will) and figure out how to reattach it (I doubt that) I will have a perfect unit.  Oh well.  My best guess is a solder bridge under the plug but it looks okay with the plug gone.  If it were misaligned that could do it.
I found an old cellphone charging cable with an obsolete connector so cut that off and hard wired to the nano.  Then I plugged the USB into a 5V charger I had laying around and I am good to go.
I calibrated the nano and made some antenna measurements and now have two working units.  They agree with one another in impedance.
Only about 20 more projects to go.
I want to thank all for helping.  Larry Rothman gave me the exact point to use.
Bob On Thursday, December 5, 2019, 03:31:43 PM PST, hwalker <herbwalker2476@...> wrote:

Bob,
  Any idea what caused the short at the connector?  Usually the USB-C connectors are not easy to misalign so I was curious as to what you thought might have occurred.

- Herb

kh6sky
 

When I received my first nano a white gecko clone, the first thing I did was drop it with the dinky microusb cable plugged in. The entire usb connector pulled off and was basically destroyed.. So I did a cludgey fix. I took a scrap piece of PC board and made four islands on it using a Harbor Freight 3/8" spot welder cutter bit.(#63657). Th hen cut one end off an old type A USB cable.and attached one end to the scrap PC board and soldered the leads to the pads. Then I used a small gauge enameled wire and attached to the traces remaining from the old micrusb connector traces. This is the hard part. I cheated on the ground wire and attached it nearby as shown. After I was satisfied I covered the fragile connections in epoxy. The enameled wires are terminated on the other end on the appropriate pad. Its ugly but really pretty usable. Could be improved in a hundred ways. If you wanted you could probably fashion this into a PC board case. Your board could be different so double check where everything goes. I am just throwing out the general idea of how it might be done.

Gyula Molnar
 

Hi Larry,
I'm glad that many people have noticed what the original author wrote in the "Know issues" section of the NanoVNA alpha1 kit assembly manual.
I think the same way, thank you for trying to confirm that I'm not trying in vain.

73, Gyula

On Fri, Dec 6, 2019 at 12:14 AM, Larry Rothman wrote:

Good to know, Bob. 
I had suggested to the devs to use 2 LiPo s with a linear 5v Reg to run the
unit in order to reduce RFI from that charger/inverter chip. 
Banggood has a 2S charging board for about $2 that you run off of an 8 to 12v
source.  I'm going to look at that setup soon in addition to modding the
bridge and freq source circuits per the discussion on Hugen's GitHub repo. 
CheersLarry

Larry Rothman
 

No problem.
We all get ahead when we 'play' with our 'toys'  ;-)


On Fri, 6 Dec 2019 at 5:44 AM, Gyula Molnar<@Gyula> wrote: Hi Larry,
I'm glad that many people have noticed what the original author wrote in the "Know issues" section of the NanoVNA alpha1 kit assembly manual.
I think the same way, thank you for trying to confirm that I'm not trying in vain.

73, Gyula

On Fri, Dec  6, 2019 at 12:14 AM, Larry Rothman wrote:

Good to know, Bob. 
I had suggested to the devs to use 2 LiPo s with a linear 5v Reg to run the
unit in order to reduce RFI from that charger/inverter chip. 
Banggood has a 2S charging board for about $2 that you run off of an 8 to 12v
source.  I'm going to look at that setup soon in addition to modding the
bridge and freq source circuits per the discussion on Hugen's GitHub repo. 
CheersLarry

Bob Albert
 

I like the idea of soldering a cable to the board.  When my mind is sufficiently clear I will take a look and see if I can identify the appropriate places on the board.
I am not optimistic because the connector I removed had many pins, and I don't have a proper guide to where to make connections.  Further, when I tried at one point to apply 5V here or there I got no results.
What I have now works well and I am loath to repair it.  It's basically a cable coming from the nano and has a USB plug on the end.  The main things that could be improved would be to add the data lines and to have a socket on the nano.  The latter isn't going to happen.  So basically I just want to know where to connect the other two wires so I can transfer data.
It's not clear on the board, what goes where and I would be unhappy if I messed it up worse than it is.
If I need to transfer data I have the fully working unit I can use.  Most of the time I am content with local operation so it's not that important.  I get very accurate readings and don't want to monkey with the bit of success I have.

On Friday, December 6, 2019, 02:51:17 AM PST, Larry Rothman <@ve3lri> wrote:

No problem.
We all get ahead when we 'play' with our 'toys'  ;-)


  On Fri, 6 Dec 2019 at 5:44 AM, Gyula Molnar<@Gyula> wrote:  Hi Larry,
I'm glad that many people have noticed what the original author wrote in the "Know issues" section of the NanoVNA alpha1 kit assembly manual.
I think the same way, thank you for trying to confirm that I'm not trying in vain.

73, Gyula
On Fri, Dec  6, 2019 at 12:14 AM, Larry Rothman wrote:

Good to know, Bob. 
I had suggested to the devs to use 2 LiPo s with a linear 5v Reg to run the
unit in order to reduce RFI from that charger/inverter chip. 
Banggood has a 2S charging board for about $2 that you run off of an 8 to 12v
source.  I'm going to look at that setup soon in addition to modding the
bridge and freq source circuits per the discussion on Hugen's GitHub repo. 
CheersLarry