Sar2593 = small impactor


Bill J. Gray
 

Hello all,

I strongly urge European observers to take a look for this object, currently on NEOCP. It should come in at 21:23 UTC at latitude +70.47, longitude W 10.40, plus or minus a few dozen km. That's about forty minutes from "right now", a bit north of Iceland.

MPC ephemerides don't include earth's gravity and are about 10' north of the actual position right now. Find_Orb, unfortunately, defaults to an epoch after the impact.

Load up the astrometry in Find_Orb, hit 'e', and enter 11.5 (to set the epoch back half a day, before impact). Then hit 'f', and you'll have the correct orbit and can generate ephemerides.

Good luck!

-- Bill


Bill J. Gray
 

Hello all,

Some data came in from (G02) in Slovakia, giving us some nice parallax relative to the initial data from (K88) in Hungary, and confirming it's for-real. Map of impact location :

https://www.projectpluto.com/temp/Sar2593.png

about a hundred km south-southwest of Jan Mayen land, which I think has a small research station on it.

You can go to

https://www.projectpluto.com/ephem.htm

enter object name Sar2593, set desired ephemeris info, and get accurate ephemerides.

Obligatory disclaimer : this thing is maybe a meter or two across. The folks on Jan Mayen will get to see a nice flash on their horizon. Other than that, it's similar to the other three impactors we've tracked before impact in 2008, 2014, and 2018 : mostly harmless.

-- Bill

On 3/11/22 15:46, Bill Gray wrote:
Hello all,
   I strongly urge European observers to take a look for this object, currently on NEOCP.  It should come in at 21:23 UTC at latitude +70.47, longitude W 10.40,  plus or minus a few dozen km.  That's about forty minutes from "right now",  a bit north of Iceland.
   MPC ephemerides don't include earth's gravity and are about 10' north of the actual position right now.  Find_Orb,  unfortunately, defaults to an epoch after the impact.
   Load up the astrometry in Find_Orb,  hit 'e',  and enter 11.5 (to set the epoch back half a day,  before impact).  Then hit 'f',  and you'll have the correct orbit and can generate ephemerides.
   Good luck!
-- Bill


Paolo Bacci
 

from 104 observer object.very difficult to measure

Mail priva di virus. www.avg.com


Il giorno ven 11 mar 2022 alle ore 21:46 Bill J. Gray <pluto@...> ha scritto:
Hello all,

    I strongly urge European observers to take a look for this object,
currently on NEOCP.  It should come in at 21:23 UTC at latitude +70.47,
longitude W 10.40,  plus or minus a few dozen km.  That's about forty
minutes from "right now",  a bit north of Iceland.

    MPC ephemerides don't include earth's gravity and are about 10'
north of the actual position right now.  Find_Orb,  unfortunately,
defaults to an epoch after the impact.

    Load up the astrometry in Find_Orb,  hit 'e',  and enter 11.5 (to
set the epoch back half a day,  before impact).  Then hit 'f',  and
you'll have the correct orbit and can generate ephemerides.

    Good luck!

-- Bill







--
-----------------------
Paolo Bacci  (108205)
B09 backman.altervista.org
B33 www.astrofilialtavaldera.it
104 www.gamp-pt.net


Sam Deen
 

Hi all,

The impact has taken place. Hopefully infrasound stations picked it up so we can get some more data on this object.

Peculiarly it was on a fairly eccentric Tj<3 orbit before impact:

   Perihelion 2022 Apr 10.572738 +/- 0.0196 TT = 13:44:44 (JD 2459680.072738)
Epoch 2022 Mar 11.85 TT = JDT 2459650.35   Earth MOID: 0.0001   Ju: 0.5413
M 354.51510248 +/- 0.06             (J2000 ecliptic)          Find_Orb
n   0.18453540 +/- 0.00205          Peri.  222.42979 +/- 0.008
a   3.05550442 +/- 0.0226           Node   350.98759 +/- 0.000015
e   0.7102395 +/- 0.00222           Incl.   10.67744 +/- 0.023
P   5.34                   H 32.3   G  0.15   U  8.6  
q 0.88536435 +/- 0.000241    Q 5.22564450 +/- 0.046
From 42 observations 2022 Mar. 11 (83.4 min); mean residual 0".75

I would guess it came from the 9:4 Kirkwood gap at 3.031 AU.

~Sam

On Friday, March 11, 2022, 04:28:05 PM EST, Paolo Bacci <b09.backman@...> wrote:


from 104 observer object.very difficult to measure

Mail priva di virus. www.avg.com

Il giorno ven 11 mar 2022 alle ore 21:46 Bill J. Gray <pluto@...> ha scritto:
Hello all,

    I strongly urge European observers to take a look for this object,
currently on NEOCP.  It should come in at 21:23 UTC at latitude +70.47,
longitude W 10.40,  plus or minus a few dozen km.  That's about forty
minutes from "right now",  a bit north of Iceland.

    MPC ephemerides don't include earth's gravity and are about 10'
north of the actual position right now.  Find_Orb,  unfortunately,
defaults to an epoch after the impact.

    Load up the astrometry in Find_Orb,  hit 'e',  and enter 11.5 (to
set the epoch back half a day,  before impact).  Then hit 'f',  and
you'll have the correct orbit and can generate ephemerides.

    Good luck!

-- Bill







--
-----------------------
Paolo Bacci  (108205)
B09 backman.altervista.org
B33 www.astrofilialtavaldera.it
104 www.gamp-pt.net


Guy Wells FRAS
 

Unfortunately cloudy at Z80. Still, quite exciting nonetheless.


Rob Matson
 

Given the aphelion distance, the size may be closer to 2 meters since objects that far out tend to have lower reflectivity. --Rob

-----Original Message-----
From: mpml@groups.io <mpml@groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill J. Gray
Sent: Friday, March 11, 2022 1:12 PM
To: MPML Groups.io <mpml@groups.io>
Subject: EXTERNAL: Re: {MPML} Sar2593 = small impactor

Hello all,

Some data came in from (G02) in Slovakia, giving us some nice parallax relative to the initial data from (K88) in Hungary, and confirming it's for-real. Map of impact location :

https://urldefense.us/v3/__https://www.projectpluto.com/temp/Sar2593.png__;!!Az_Xe1LHMyBq19w!ff4VVSCYy4NNW47ZAWUl-0ocKVjpLQln9paZiJlQ5cNaO26j8TxTOCzVy43oLU-uh6UH$

about a hundred km south-southwest of Jan Mayen land, which I think has a small research station on it.

You can go to

https://urldefense.us/v3/__https://www.projectpluto.com/ephem.htm__;!!Az_Xe1LHMyBq19w!ff4VVSCYy4NNW47ZAWUl-0ocKVjpLQln9paZiJlQ5cNaO26j8TxTOCzVy43oLYxyQbXJ$

enter object name Sar2593, set desired ephemeris info, and get accurate ephemerides.

Obligatory disclaimer : this thing is maybe a meter or two across.
The folks on Jan Mayen will get to see a nice flash on their horizon.
Other than that, it's similar to the other three impactors we've tracked before impact in 2008, 2014, and 2018 : mostly harmless.

-- Bill

On 3/11/22 15:46, Bill Gray wrote:
Hello all,

   I strongly urge European observers to take a look for this object,
currently on NEOCP.  It should come in at 21:23 UTC at latitude
+70.47, longitude W 10.40,  plus or minus a few dozen km.  That's
about forty minutes from "right now",  a bit north of Iceland.

   MPC ephemerides don't include earth's gravity and are about 10'
north of the actual position right now.  Find_Orb,  unfortunately,
defaults to an epoch after the impact.

   Load up the astrometry in Find_Orb,  hit 'e',  and enter 11.5 (to
set the epoch back half a day,  before impact).  Then hit 'f',  and
you'll have the correct orbit and can generate ephemerides.

   Good luck!

-- Bill


Sam Deen
 

Small correction to my earlier post: Earth drastically perturbed it just prior to impact. Here was its proper pre-impact orbit:

   Perihelion 2022 Apr 10.807908 +/- 0.0216 TT = 19:23:23 (JD 2459680.307908)
Epoch 2021 Jan  1.0 TT = JDT 2459215.5   Earth MOID: 0.0004   Ju: 0.6622
M 263.64435902 +/- 1.0              (J2000 ecliptic)          Find_Orb
n   0.20730206 +/- 0.00222          Peri.  222.43057 +/- 0.009
a   2.82748488 +/- 0.0202           Node   351.00692 +/- 0.000028
e   0.6863153 +/- 0.00233           Incl.   10.42040 +/- 0.024
P   4.75                   H 32.3   G  0.15   U  8.6  
q 0.88693873 +/- 0.000258    Q 4.76803103 +/- 0.0411
From 42 observations 2022 Mar. 11 (83.4 min); mean residual 0".75

Much more in line with a 5:2 kirkwood gap (2.825 AU) orbit. I don't think it should be treated like an exceptionally low-albedo asteroid in this case - more likely a typical C-type.

~Sam

On Friday, March 11, 2022, 04:31:36 PM EST, Rob Matson via groups.io <robert.d.matson@...> wrote:


Given the aphelion distance, the size may be closer to 2 meters since objects that far out tend to have lower reflectivity.  --Rob

-----Original Message-----
From: mpml@groups.io <mpml@groups.io> On Behalf Of Bill J. Gray
Sent: Friday, March 11, 2022 1:12 PM
To: MPML Groups.io <mpml@groups.io>
Subject: EXTERNAL: Re: {MPML} Sar2593 = small impactor

Hello all,

    Some data came in from (G02) in Slovakia,  giving us some nice parallax relative to the initial data from (K88) in Hungary,  and confirming it's for-real.  Map of impact location :


    about a hundred km south-southwest of Jan Mayen land,  which I think has a small research station on it.

    You can go to


    enter object name Sar2593,  set desired ephemeris info,  and get accurate ephemerides.

    Obligatory disclaimer : this thing is maybe a meter or two across.
The folks on Jan Mayen will get to see a nice flash on their horizon.
Other than that,  it's similar to the other three impactors we've tracked before impact in 2008,  2014,  and 2018 : mostly harmless.

-- Bill

On 3/11/22 15:46, Bill Gray wrote:
> Hello all,
>
>     I strongly urge European observers to take a look for this object,
> currently on NEOCP.  It should come in at 21:23 UTC at latitude
> +70.47, longitude W 10.40,  plus or minus a few dozen km.  That's
> about forty minutes from "right now",  a bit north of Iceland.
>
>     MPC ephemerides don't include earth's gravity and are about 10'
> north of the actual position right now.  Find_Orb,  unfortunately,
> defaults to an epoch after the impact.
>
>     Load up the astrometry in Find_Orb,  hit 'e',  and enter 11.5 (to
> set the epoch back half a day,  before impact).  Then hit 'f',  and
> you'll have the correct orbit and can generate ephemerides.
>
>     Good luck!
>
> -- Bill











Gonzalo Blasco
 

Waiting infrasound data.

Perhaps some trace in Meteosat 11

El El vie, 11 de marzo de 2022 a la(s) 15:30, Guy Wells FRAS <rasskipper@...> escribió:
Unfortunately cloudy at Z80. Still, quite exciting nonetheless.

--
--
Gonzalo Blasco Gil


Bill J. Gray
 

Hi Paolo,

The image got stripped; I've put it at

https://www.projectpluto.com/temp/ds9_10.png

Yeah, that'd be a tough one to measure! The computed motion was about 65" per second, with the object about 12300 km away.

But it may be the only data we get aside from the observations from (K88) and (G02), and you're about a thousand kilometers from both of them. So your parallax adds some good info here.

-- Bill

On 3/11/22 16:27, Paolo Bacci wrote:
from 104 observer object.very difficult to measure
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Il giorno ven 11 mar 2022 alle ore 21:46 Bill J. Gray <pluto@... <mailto:pluto@...>> ha scritto:
Hello all,
    I strongly urge European observers to take a look for this object,
currently on NEOCP.  It should come in at 21:23 UTC at latitude +70.47,
longitude W 10.40,  plus or minus a few dozen km.  That's about forty
minutes from "right now",  a bit north of Iceland.
    MPC ephemerides don't include earth's gravity and are about 10'
north of the actual position right now.  Find_Orb,  unfortunately,
defaults to an epoch after the impact.
    Load up the astrometry in Find_Orb,  hit 'e',  and enter 11.5 (to
set the epoch back half a day,  before impact).  Then hit 'f',  and
you'll have the correct orbit and can generate ephemerides.
    Good luck!
-- Bill
--
-----------------------
Paolo Bacci  (108205)
B09 backman.altervista.org <http://backman.altervista.org>
B33 www.astrofilialtavaldera.it <http://www.astrofilialtavaldera.it>
104 www.gamp-pt.net <http://www.gamp-pt.net>
UAI - www.uai.it <http://www.uai.it>
mailing List Asteroid
https://groups.io/g/Asteroidi-UAI <https://groups.io/g/Asteroidi-UAI>


David Tholen
 

Yeah,  that'd be a tough one to measure!  The computed motion was
about 65" per second,  with the object about 12300 km away.
Conceptually not any different from measuring a GPS satellite, which
move about half that speed. We measure GPS satellites every night of
observing.


Quanzhi Ye
 

Hi Bill, Paolo,

We also got it at N88 (NW China)! Hopefully this helps refining the orbit. The object is also announced as 2022 EB5: https://www.minorplanetcenter.net/mpec/K22/K22EH8.html. Unfortunately the N88 observations did not make it until the object has been MPEC'ed.

Best,
Quanzhi

==

Sar2593 tC2022 03 11.87737 09 04 41.41 +42 57 54.5 14.5 G N88
Sar2593 tC2022 03 11.87764 09 03 05.08 +42 59 25.5 N88
Sar2593 tC2022 03 11.87792 09 01 25.90 +43 00 55.4 N88

On 3/11/22 16:42, Bill J. Gray wrote:
Hi Paolo,
   The image got stripped;  I've put it at
https://www.projectpluto.com/temp/ds9_10.png
   Yeah,  that'd be a tough one to measure!  The computed motion was about 65" per second,  with the object about 12300 km away.
    But it may be the only data we get aside from the observations from (K88) and (G02),  and you're about a thousand kilometers from both of them.  So your parallax adds some good info here.
-- Bill
On 3/11/22 16:27, Paolo Bacci wrote:
from 104 observer object.very difficult to measure

<http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail>     Mail priva di virus. www.avg.com <http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail>

<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

Il giorno ven 11 mar 2022 alle ore 21:46 Bill J. Gray <pluto@... <mailto:pluto@...>> ha scritto:

    Hello all,

         I strongly urge European observers to take a look for this object,
    currently on NEOCP.  It should come in at 21:23 UTC at latitude +70.47,
    longitude W 10.40,  plus or minus a few dozen km.  That's about forty
    minutes from "right now",  a bit north of Iceland.

         MPC ephemerides don't include earth's gravity and are about 10'
    north of the actual position right now.  Find_Orb,  unfortunately,
    defaults to an epoch after the impact.

         Load up the astrometry in Find_Orb,  hit 'e',  and enter 11.5 (to
    set the epoch back half a day,  before impact).  Then hit 'f',  and
    you'll have the correct orbit and can generate ephemerides.

         Good luck!

    -- Bill







--
-----------------------
Paolo Bacci  (108205)
B09 backman.altervista.org <http://backman.altervista.org>
B33 www.astrofilialtavaldera.it <http://www.astrofilialtavaldera.it>
104 www.gamp-pt.net <http://www.gamp-pt.net>
UAI - www.uai.it <http://www.uai.it>


      mailing List Asteroid

https://groups.io/g/Asteroidi-UAI <https://groups.io/g/Asteroidi-UAI>


--
(*) If this email arrives outside your working hours, please don't feel obligated to respond until your normal working hours.
--
Ye Quanzhi (QZ)
Assistant Research Scientist
Department of Astronomy
University of Maryland
http://www.astro.umd.edu/~qye/


George Herbert
 

Infrasound detection early results:


-george 


On Mar 11, 2022, at 2:39 PM, Quanzhi Ye <qye@...> wrote:

Hi Bill, Paolo,

We also got it at N88 (NW China)! Hopefully this helps refining the orbit. The object is also announced as 2022 EB5: https://www.minorplanetcenter.net/mpec/K22/K22EH8.html. Unfortunately the N88 observations did not make it until the object has been MPEC'ed.

Best,
Quanzhi

==

    Sar2593 tC2022 03 11.87737 09 04 41.41 +42 57 54.5          14.5 G      N88
    Sar2593 tC2022 03 11.87764 09 03 05.08 +42 59 25.5       N88
    Sar2593 tC2022 03 11.87792 09 01 25.90 +43 00 55.4       N88

On 3/11/22 16:42, Bill J. Gray wrote:
Hi Paolo,
   The image got stripped;  I've put it at
https://www.projectpluto.com/temp/ds9_10.png
   Yeah,  that'd be a tough one to measure!  The computed motion was about 65" per second,  with the object about 12300 km away.
    But it may be the only data we get aside from the observations from (K88) and (G02),  and you're about a thousand kilometers from both of them.  So your parallax adds some good info here.
-- Bill
On 3/11/22 16:27, Paolo Bacci wrote:
from 104 observer object.very difficult to measure

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<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

Il giorno ven 11 mar 2022 alle ore 21:46 Bill J. Gray <pluto@... <mailto:pluto@...>> ha scritto:

    Hello all,

         I strongly urge European observers to take a look for this object,
    currently on NEOCP.  It should come in at 21:23 UTC at latitude +70.47,
    longitude W 10.40,  plus or minus a few dozen km.  That's about forty
    minutes from "right now",  a bit north of Iceland.

         MPC ephemerides don't include earth's gravity and are about 10'
    north of the actual position right now.  Find_Orb,  unfortunately,
    defaults to an epoch after the impact.

         Load up the astrometry in Find_Orb,  hit 'e',  and enter 11.5 (to
    set the epoch back half a day,  before impact).  Then hit 'f',  and
    you'll have the correct orbit and can generate ephemerides.

         Good luck!

    -- Bill







--
-----------------------
Paolo Bacci  (108205)
B09 backman.altervista.org <http://backman.altervista.org>
B33 www.astrofilialtavaldera.it <http://www.astrofilialtavaldera.it>
104 www.gamp-pt.net <http://www.gamp-pt.net>
UAI - www.uai.it <http://www.uai.it>


      mailing List Asteroid

https://groups.io/g/Asteroidi-UAI <https://groups.io/g/Asteroidi-UAI>




--
(*) If this email arrives outside your working hours, please don't feel obligated to respond until your normal working hours.
--
Ye Quanzhi (QZ)
Assistant Research Scientist
Department of Astronomy
University of Maryland
http://www.astro.umd.edu/~qye/






tony873004
 


On Fri, Mar 11, 2022 at 6:01 PM George Herbert <george.herbert@...> wrote:
Infrasound detection early results:


-george 


On Mar 11, 2022, at 2:39 PM, Quanzhi Ye <qye@...> wrote:

Hi Bill, Paolo,

We also got it at N88 (NW China)! Hopefully this helps refining the orbit. The object is also announced as 2022 EB5: https://www.minorplanetcenter.net/mpec/K22/K22EH8.html. Unfortunately the N88 observations did not make it until the object has been MPEC'ed.

Best,
Quanzhi

==

    Sar2593 tC2022 03 11.87737 09 04 41.41 +42 57 54.5          14.5 G      N88
    Sar2593 tC2022 03 11.87764 09 03 05.08 +42 59 25.5       N88
    Sar2593 tC2022 03 11.87792 09 01 25.90 +43 00 55.4       N88

On 3/11/22 16:42, Bill J. Gray wrote:
Hi Paolo,
   The image got stripped;  I've put it at
https://www.projectpluto.com/temp/ds9_10.png
   Yeah,  that'd be a tough one to measure!  The computed motion was about 65" per second,  with the object about 12300 km away.
    But it may be the only data we get aside from the observations from (K88) and (G02),  and you're about a thousand kilometers from both of them.  So your parallax adds some good info here.
-- Bill
On 3/11/22 16:27, Paolo Bacci wrote:
from 104 observer object.very difficult to measure

<http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail>     Mail priva di virus. www.avg.com <http://www.avg.com/email-signature?utm_medium=email&utm_source=link&utm_campaign=sig-email&utm_content=webmail>

<#DAB4FAD8-2DD7-40BB-A1B8-4E2AA1F9FDF2>

Il giorno ven 11 mar 2022 alle ore 21:46 Bill J. Gray <pluto@... <mailto:pluto@...>> ha scritto:

    Hello all,

         I strongly urge European observers to take a look for this object,
    currently on NEOCP.  It should come in at 21:23 UTC at latitude +70.47,
    longitude W 10.40,  plus or minus a few dozen km.  That's about forty
    minutes from "right now",  a bit north of Iceland.

         MPC ephemerides don't include earth's gravity and are about 10'
    north of the actual position right now.  Find_Orb,  unfortunately,
    defaults to an epoch after the impact.

         Load up the astrometry in Find_Orb,  hit 'e',  and enter 11.5 (to
    set the epoch back half a day,  before impact).  Then hit 'f',  and
    you'll have the correct orbit and can generate ephemerides.

         Good luck!

    -- Bill







--
-----------------------
Paolo Bacci  (108205)
B09 backman.altervista.org <http://backman.altervista.org>
B33 www.astrofilialtavaldera.it <http://www.astrofilialtavaldera.it>
104 www.gamp-pt.net <http://www.gamp-pt.net>
UAI - www.uai.it <http://www.uai.it>


      mailing List Asteroid

https://groups.io/g/Asteroidi-UAI <https://groups.io/g/Asteroidi-UAI>




--
(*) If this email arrives outside your working hours, please don't feel obligated to respond until your normal working hours.
--
Ye Quanzhi (QZ)
Assistant Research Scientist
Department of Astronomy
University of Maryland
http://www.astro.umd.edu/~qye/






David Tholen
 

Infrasound detection early results
Hmm, interesting discrepancy in impact time. The Scout prediction:

MIN_IMP_TIME = 2022-03-11 21:23:52 TDB
MAX_IMP_TIME = 2022-03-11 21:23:56 TDB

The infrasound extrapolation:

Infrasound detection from 2022 EB5 impact off the coast of Iceland at I37NO between 2223-2227 UTC. Below is I18DK infrasound data in Greenland. Arrival near 2340 UTC.

An hour difference?


Adrien Coffinet
 

Isn't this time discrepancy just a question of speed of sound?


Le sam. 12 mars 2022 12:29, David Tholen <tholen@...> a écrit :
> Infrasound detection early results

Hmm, interesting discrepancy in impact time.  The Scout prediction:

MIN_IMP_TIME = 2022-03-11 21:23:52 TDB
MAX_IMP_TIME = 2022-03-11 21:23:56 TDB

The infrasound extrapolation:

Infrasound detection from 2022 EB5 impact off the coast of Iceland at I37NO between 2223-2227 UTC.
Below is I18DK infrasound data in Greenland. Arrival near 2340 UTC.

An hour difference?






David Tholen
 

Isn't this time discrepancy just a question of speed of sound?
That's what I attributed to the difference between the impact
"between 2223-2227 UTC" and "arrival near 2340 UTC".

Still an hour between the Scout impact time and the earlier times
shown above.


Gonzalo Blasco
 

There is this twit reporting a Meteosat 10? Capture at 21.28UTC . But there is no much reference about the published image , the satellite used or the bandwith.

Has anyone checked or analyzed this image?

Gonzalo

El El sáb, 12 de marzo de 2022 a la(s) 8:17, David Tholen <tholen@...> escribió:
> Isn't this time discrepancy just a question of speed of sound?

That's what I attributed to the difference between the impact
"between 2223-2227 UTC" and "arrival near 2340 UTC".

Still an hour between the Scout impact time and the earlier times
shown above.





--
--
Gonzalo Blasco Gil


Sam Deen
 

Hi Gonzalo,

These images should be found from Eumetview although I can't find the image they claim.

I'd say the image is pretty suspect though. Even with projected altitude, the location in the image is almost 1000 km from the impact. I find it difficult to imagine that perspective could move it this far.

~Sam

On Saturday, March 12, 2022, 11:55:17 AM EST, Gonzalo Blasco <gblasco@...> wrote:


There is this twit reporting a Meteosat 10? Capture at 21.28UTC . But there is no much reference about the published image , the satellite used or the bandwith.

Has anyone checked or analyzed this image?

Gonzalo

El El sáb, 12 de marzo de 2022 a la(s) 8:17, David Tholen <tholen@...> escribió:
> Isn't this time discrepancy just a question of speed of sound?

That's what I attributed to the difference between the impact
"between 2223-2227 UTC" and "arrival near 2340 UTC".

Still an hour between the Scout impact time and the earlier times
shown above.





--
--
Gonzalo Blasco Gil


tony873004
 

A Twitter user posted this video. Perhaps? Not much motion. I can't rule out an aircraft on approach. Seems like it is on the wrong side of the clouds, but might be bright enough to shine through thin clouds.
https://twitter.com/tvxtra/status/1503147101752074249

On Sat, Mar 12, 2022 at 1:04 PM Sam Deen via groups.io <planetaryscience=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Gonzalo,

These images should be found from Eumetview although I can't find the image they claim.

I'd say the image is pretty suspect though. Even with projected altitude, the location in the image is almost 1000 km from the impact. I find it difficult to imagine that perspective could move it this far.

~Sam

On Saturday, March 12, 2022, 11:55:17 AM EST, Gonzalo Blasco <gblasco@...> wrote:


There is this twit reporting a Meteosat 10? Capture at 21.28UTC . But there is no much reference about the published image , the satellite used or the bandwith.

Has anyone checked or analyzed this image?

Gonzalo

El El sáb, 12 de marzo de 2022 a la(s) 8:17, David Tholen <tholen@...> escribió:
> Isn't this time discrepancy just a question of speed of sound?

That's what I attributed to the difference between the impact
"between 2223-2227 UTC" and "arrival near 2340 UTC".

Still an hour between the Scout impact time and the earlier times
shown above.





--
--
Gonzalo Blasco Gil


George Herbert
 

Ground location 64.147710°N 21.923183°W · 5.18 m; Rekyavik harbor pathway.  Bearing about 355 degrees (approximate).



-george 


On Mar 13, 2022, at 8:01 PM, tony873004 <tony@...> wrote:


A Twitter user posted this video. Perhaps? Not much motion. I can't rule out an aircraft on approach. Seems like it is on the wrong side of the clouds, but might be bright enough to shine through thin clouds.
https://twitter.com/tvxtra/status/1503147101752074249

On Sat, Mar 12, 2022 at 1:04 PM Sam Deen via groups.io <planetaryscience=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi Gonzalo,

These images should be found from Eumetview although I can't find the image they claim.

I'd say the image is pretty suspect though. Even with projected altitude, the location in the image is almost 1000 km from the impact. I find it difficult to imagine that perspective could move it this far.

~Sam

On Saturday, March 12, 2022, 11:55:17 AM EST, Gonzalo Blasco <gblasco@...> wrote:


There is this twit reporting a Meteosat 10? Capture at 21.28UTC . But there is no much reference about the published image , the satellite used or the bandwith.

Has anyone checked or analyzed this image?

Gonzalo

El El sáb, 12 de marzo de 2022 a la(s) 8:17, David Tholen <tholen@...> escribió:
> Isn't this time discrepancy just a question of speed of sound?

That's what I attributed to the difference between the impact
"between 2223-2227 UTC" and "arrival near 2340 UTC".

Still an hour between the Scout impact time and the earlier times
shown above.





--
--
Gonzalo Blasco Gil