temporary holiday sites


timsinc Sinclair
 

On 18 August 2020 2:49:55 pm "David Scholes" <scholesd@...> wrote:
Now is the time of year that we should have been leaving to go to Halsall for the Cc&C folk dance group THS which was 3 weeks of folk dancing in the evenings

Never having used a THS before, I was wondering how you coped for three weeks. Such as how and where you dumped grey water. Perhaps 'elsan' points for loo contents? Guess there'll be taps for water but no electric hook-ups. So solar or generator needed? 

I'm loving it on the small Bridge House campsite (nr Abingdon) on the edge of the Thames. But it's not really geared for m-homes - no service point or drive-over drain. In fact only one tap for everyone in the middle of the well-mowed grass. At the small sani building is what's called a sluice. Not inspected but to where I guess caravanners haul all their liquid waste. But there are plenty of ehu points dotted about among the well-spaced trees.

As well as the few caravans, tents just outnumber the half dozen campers. Turnover I've seen on my third of five days is fairly brisk though (my waste probably over-flowing on departure!) Can see with the warm days why those under canvas pitch here. Then I feel smug in my capsule when we're suddenly hit by intermittent torrential downpours. Been quite a few today. Again now, sun is shining so must be a rainbow - it's still raining.

Tim


David Scholes
 

For Tim and anybody interested.

Halsall and other rallies/THSs. How they work.

Any member of CC&C may attend.
Motorhome, Caravan’s, trailer tents and tents allowed.
Two toilet dump points (with water taps) and two drinking water points at Halsall, rallies usually only one.
No electric points but plugs inside the hall usually have multiple phones on charge.
Grey water usually in tanks on wheels usually dumped under hedges but down drain if you wish.
Toilets in hall open much of the day.
Most people (except stewards, dance callers etc) do not stay all 3 weeks, many just do 3 day sessions.
Some activities during day (in hall) often centred on children or beginner dancers.
This is English Country Dancing not unlike Barn Dances (it is NOT Morris Dancing).
Halsall held at a school (on sports field) school hall for dancing.
NONE of the activities are compulsory.
For all CC&C rallies one should be ‘self contained’.
BUT not many rallies are being run and I don’t know of ANY dancing rallies.
Rallies are normally max 5 days but THS may be up to 21 days are held wherever the sites officer thinks his members would enjoy.
Dancing is run by FDSG (Folk Dance and Song Group) through its area sections.
Cost is about £12 per night for THS but less for the ordinary rallies.

Hope that helps

David



On 18 Aug 2020, at 18:43, timsinc Sinclair <timsinc@...> wrote:


On 18 August 2020 2:49:55 pm "David Scholes" <scholesd@...> wrote:
Now is the time of year that we should have been leaving to go to Halsall for the Cc&C folk dance group THS which was 3 weeks of folk dancing in the evenings

Never having used a THS before, I was wondering how you coped for three weeks. Such as how and where you dumped grey water. Perhaps 'elsan' points for loo contents? Guess there'll be taps for water but no electric hook-ups. So solar or generator needed? 

I'm loving it on the small Bridge House campsite (nr Abingdon) on the edge of the Thames. But it's not really geared for m-homes - no service point or drive-over drain. In fact only one tap for everyone in the middle of the well-mowed grass. At the small sani building is what's called a sluice. Not inspected but to where I guess caravanners haul all their liquid waste. But there are plenty of ehu points dotted about among the well-spaced trees.

As well as the few caravans, tents just outnumber the half dozen campers. Turnover I've seen on my third of five days is fairly brisk though (my waste probably over-flowing on departure!) Can see with the warm days why those under canvas pitch here. Then I feel smug in my capsule when we're suddenly hit by intermittent torrential downpours. Been quite a few today. Again now, sun is shining so must be a rainbow - it's still raining.

Tim


timsinc Sinclair
 

Thank you, David. Now understand that you're not spending all 21 days
dancing the nights away. And not having a loo-full problem.

You mentioned childen and beginners, but geriatrics? Never understood
Morris dancing appeal (or even watching) but on occasion been dragged
into Scottish dancing at family-do's. Country dancing similarly quite
formuliac? As opposed to just jigging/jiving around like at a disco or
wedding?

Tim

On 18/08/2020, David Scholes <scholesd@gmx.co.uk> wrote:
For Tim and anybody interested.

Halsall and other rallies/THSs. How they work.

Any member of CC&C may attend.
Motorhome, Caravan’s, trailer tents and tents allowed.
Two toilet dump points (with water taps) and two drinking water points at
Halsall, rallies usually only one.
No electric points but plugs inside the hall usually have multiple phones on
charge.
Grey water usually in tanks on wheels usually dumped under hedges but down
drain if you wish.
Toilets in hall open much of the day.
Most people (except stewards, dance callers etc) do not stay all 3 weeks,
many just do 3 day sessions.
Some activities during day (in hall) often centred on children or beginner
dancers.
This is English Country Dancing not unlike Barn Dances (it is NOT Morris
Dancing).
Halsall held at a school (on sports field) school hall for dancing.
NONE of the activities are compulsory.
For all CC&C rallies one should be ‘self contained’.
BUT not many rallies are being run and I don’t know of ANY dancing rallies.
Rallies are normally max 5 days but THS may be up to 21 days are held
wherever the sites officer thinks his members would enjoy.
Dancing is run by FDSG (Folk Dance and Song Group) through its area
sections.
Cost is about £12 per night for THS but less for the ordinary rallies.

Hope that helps

David
On 18 Aug 2020, at 18:43, timsinc Sinclair <timsinc@gmail.com> wrote:


On 18 August 2020 2:49:55 pm "David Scholes" <scholesd@gmx.co.uk> wrote:
Now is the time of year that we should have been leaving to go to Halsall
for the Cc&C folk dance group THS which was 3 weeks of folk dancing in
the evenings

Never having used a THS before, I was wondering how you coped for three
weeks. Such as how and where you dumped grey water. Perhaps 'elsan' points
for loo contents? Guess there'll be taps for water but no electric
hook-ups. So solar or generator needed?

I'm loving it on the small Bridge House campsite (nr Abingdon) on the edge
of the Thames. But it's not really geared for m-homes - no service point
or drive-over drain. In fact only one tap for everyone in the middle of
the well-mowed grass. At the small sani building is what's called a
sluice. Not inspected but to where I guess caravanners haul all their
liquid waste. But there are plenty of ehu points dotted about among the
well-spaced trees.

As well as the few caravans, tents just outnumber the half dozen campers.
Turnover I've seen on my third of five days is fairly brisk though (my
waste probably over-flowing on departure!) Can see with the warm days why
those under canvas pitch here. Then I feel smug in my capsule when we're
suddenly hit by intermittent torrential downpours. Been quite a few today.
Again now, sun is shining so must be a rainbow - it's still raining.

Tim



--

*It'll all be OK in the end. If it's not OK, it's not the end*


David Scholes
 

But like I said Tim, it is not Morris Dancing, it is English Country Dancing. It is very like Scottish but you walk it through before you start and the caller calls the moves before you do them.

David

On 18 Aug 2020, at 21:22, timsinc Sinclair <timsinc@gmail.com> wrote:

Thank you, David. Now understand that you're not spending all 21 days
dancing the nights away. And not having a loo-full problem.

You mentioned childen and beginners, but geriatrics? Never understood
Morris dancing appeal (or even watching) but on occasion been dragged
into Scottish dancing at family-do's. Country dancing similarly quite
formuliac? As opposed to just jigging/jiving around like at a disco or
wedding?

Tim

On 18/08/2020, David Scholes <scholesd@gmx.co.uk> wrote:
For Tim and anybody interested.

Halsall and other rallies/THSs. How they work.

Any member of CC&C may attend.
Motorhome, Caravan’s, trailer tents and tents allowed.
Two toilet dump points (with water taps) and two drinking water points at
Halsall, rallies usually only one.
No electric points but plugs inside the hall usually have multiple phones on
charge.
Grey water usually in tanks on wheels usually dumped under hedges but down
drain if you wish.
Toilets in hall open much of the day.
Most people (except stewards, dance callers etc) do not stay all 3 weeks,
many just do 3 day sessions.
Some activities during day (in hall) often centred on children or beginner
dancers.
This is English Country Dancing not unlike Barn Dances (it is NOT Morris
Dancing).
Halsall held at a school (on sports field) school hall for dancing.
NONE of the activities are compulsory.
For all CC&C rallies one should be ‘self contained’.
BUT not many rallies are being run and I don’t know of ANY danci


Bennett Family
 

It’s good fun even if you are not very good at it (me)! Although I used to prefer playing with the band.

Martin

On 18 Aug 2020, at 22:11, David Scholes <scholesd@gmx.co.uk> wrote:

But like I said Tim, it is not Morris Dancing, it is English Country Dancing. It is very like Scottish but you walk it through before you start and the caller calls the moves before you do them.

David
On 18 Aug 2020, at 21:22, timsinc Sinclair <timsinc@gmail.com> wrote:

Thank you, David. Now understand that you're not spending all 21 days
dancing the nights away. And not having a loo-full problem.

You mentioned childen and beginners, but geriatrics? Never understood
Morris dancing appeal (or even watching) but on occasion been dragged
into Scottish dancing at family-do's. Country dancing similarly quite
formuliac? As opposed to just jigging/jiving around like at a disco or
wedding?

Tim

On 18/08/2020, David Scholes <scholesd@gmx.co.uk> wrote:
For Tim and anybody interested.

Halsall and other rallies/THSs. How they work.

Any member of CC&C may attend.
Motorhome, Caravan’s, trailer tents and tents allowed.
Two toilet dump points (with water taps) and two drinking water points at
Halsall, rallies usually only one.
No electric points but plugs inside the hall usually have multiple phones on
charge.
Grey water usually in tanks on wheels usually dumped under hedges but down
drain if you wish.
Toilets in hall open much of the day.
Most people (except stewards, dance callers etc) do not stay all 3 weeks,
many just do 3 day sessions.
Some activities during day (in hall) often centred on children or beginner
dancers.
This is English Country Dancing not unlike Barn Dances (it is NOT Morris
Dancing).
Halsall held at a school (on sports field) school hall for dancing.
NONE of the activities are compulsory.
For all CC&C rallies one should be ‘self contained’.
BUT not many rallies are being run and I don’t know of ANY danci



David Scholes
 

When I was about 67 I decided to learn to play the melodeon. I’m still trying but I now have a great respect for those in the band.
But dancing is great fun.

No, dancing used to be great fun. Not only have the CCC dance groups stopped but also the local dancing groups have stopped.
Lockdown has stopped all the dancing in England and probably in Scotland as well.

David

On 18 Aug 2020, at 22:17, Bennett Family via groups.io <martin.bennett47=me.com@groups.io> wrote:

It’s good fun even if you are not very good at it (me)! Although I used to prefer playing with the band.

Martin
On 18 Aug 2020, at 22:11, David Scholes <scholesd@gmx.co.uk> wrote:

But like I said Tim, it is not Morris Dancing, it is English Country Dancing. It is very like Scottish but you walk it through before you start and the caller calls the moves before you do them.

David
On 18 Aug 2020, at 21:22, timsinc Sinclair <timsinc@gmail.com> wrote:
Thank you, David. Now understand that you're not spending all 21 days
dancing the nights away. And not having a loo-full problem.

You mentioned childen and beginners, but geriatrics? Never understood
Morris dancing appeal (or even watching) but on occasion been dragged
into Scottish dancing at family-do's. Country dancing similarly quite
formuliac? As opposed to just jigging/jiving around like at a disco or
wedding?

Tim

On 18/08/2020, David Scholes <scholesd@gmx.co.uk> wrote:
For Tim and anybody interested.

Halsall and other rallies/THSs. How they work.

Any member of CC&C may attend.
Motorhome, Caravan’s, trailer tents and tents allowed.
Two toilet dump points (with water taps) and two drinking water points at
Halsall, rallies usually only one.
No electric points but plugs inside the hall usually have multiple phones on
charge.
Grey water usually in tanks on wheels usually dumped under hedges but down


Brent
 

Hi All Can I just mention THS meetings are allowed a maximum of 28 days at any one location. We will use when on mainland but not on Island due to Kim not liking the site. When on our local committee we used to help setup THS and it was a hard slog - or am I just getting old!!!!?
Take care and stay safe


malcolmbebb
 

English country dancing is indeed formulaic, although in England there is a reduced expectation that dancers will know the dances and instruction is normally provided for each dance.
 
Typically the age profile is towards the higher end especially in dance club events. Country dancing is often seen as an old person's activity, unfortunately, although that was not always the case. Some events do address this, perhaps not enough.
 
In the current situation, the older participants are seen as most at risk and therefore most advised not to attend events. Naturally they tend to be more risk averse, too, so taking all together most older dancers that I know have no plans to return to dancing until a vaccine or effective cure is available.
Therefore the main body of participants for many dance events, often also the most keen and likely to attend, are avoiding events until further notice. Thus the critical mass to run events is not available even if the challenging social distancing requirements can be overcome. .
 
I've only been to a couple of C&CC folk club events, but the situation seems pretty similar.
 
I would agree that dancing is good fun, for those able to overcome their inhibitions, and is seen as a good way to keep fit particularly for the "geriatrics".

Morris is similarly affected, in particular by the social distancing requirements, and without dancers musicians are a bit spare...
 
More generally I am hoping to visit a few more temporary holiday sites, I don't think they are well enough known, in the not too distant future, if I don't jump I am expecting to be pushed! So I hope they will still be supported, even if not for dance events.



Tim Sagar
 

I know a guy who makes Clogs if its of any interest?

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: malcolmbebb via groups.io
Sent: 19 August 2020 11:23
To: motorhome-list@groups.io
Subject: Re: [motorhome-list] temporary holiday sites

 

English country dancing is indeed formulaic, although in England there is a reduced expectation that dancers will know the dances and instruction is normally provided for each dance.

 

Typically the age profile is towards the higher end especially in dance club events. Country dancing is often seen as an old person's activity, unfortunately, although that was not always the case. Some events do address this, perhaps not enough.

 

In the current situation, the older participants are seen as most at risk and therefore most advised not to attend events. Naturally they tend to be more risk averse, too, so taking all together most older dancers that I know have no plans to return to dancing until a vaccine or effective cure is available.

Therefore the main body of participants for many dance events, often also the most keen and likely to attend, are avoiding events until further notice. Thus the critical mass to run events is not available even if the challenging social distancing requirements can be overcome. .

 

I've only been to a couple of C&CC folk club events, but the situation seems pretty similar.

 

I would agree that dancing is good fun, for those able to overcome their inhibitions, and is seen as a good way to keep fit particularly for the "geriatrics".

Morris is similarly affected, in particular by the social distancing requirements, and without dancers musicians are a bit spare...

 

More generally I am hoping to visit a few more temporary holiday sites, I don't think they are well enough known, in the not too distant future, if I don't jump I am expecting to be pushed! So I hope they will still be supported, even if not for dance events.

 

 


David Scholes
 

Clogs are still used for clog dancing but that has nothing to do with English Country Dancing except occasionally as a ‘turn’.

David


On 19 Aug 2020, at 11:35, Tim Sagar via groups.io <t.sagar761@...> wrote:



I know a guy who makes Clogs if its of any interest?

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: malcolmbebb via groups.io
Sent: 19 August 2020 11:23
To: motorhome-list@groups.io
Subject: Re: [motorhome-list] temporary holiday sites

 

English country dancing is indeed formulaic, although in England there is a reduced expectation that dancers will know the dances and instruction is normally provided for each dance.

 

Typically the age profile is towards the higher end especially in dance club events. Country dancing is often seen as an old person's activity, unfortunately, although that was not always the case. Some events do address this, perhaps not enough.

 

In the current situation, the older participants are seen as most at risk and therefore most advised not to attend events. Naturally they tend to be more risk averse, too, so taking all together most older dancers that I know have no plans to return to dancing until a vaccine or effective cure is available.

Therefore the main body of participants for many dance events, often also the most keen and likely to attend, are avoiding events until further notice. Thus the critical mass to run events is not available even if the challenging social distancing requirements can be overcome. .

 

I've only been to a couple of C&CC folk club events, but the situation seems pretty similar.

 

I would agree that dancing is good fun, for those able to overcome their inhibitions, and is seen as a good way to keep fit particularly for the "geriatrics".

Morris is similarly affected, in particular by the social distancing requirements, and without dancers musicians are a bit spare...

 

More generally I am hoping to visit a few more temporary holiday sites, I don't think they are well enough known, in the not too distant future, if I don't jump I am expecting to be pushed! So I hope they will still be supported, even if not for dance events.

 

 

Attachments:


Sandytrax
 

I remember the ‘doe see doe’ from my country dancing days in Devon 40 years ago.

Take your partners please!
Brian

On 19 Aug 2020, at 16:32, David Scholes <scholesd@...> wrote:

Clogs are still used for clog dancing but that has nothing to do with English Country Dancing except occasionally as a ‘turn’.

David


On 19 Aug 2020, at 11:35, Tim Sagar via groups.io <t.sagar761@...> wrote:



I know a guy who makes Clogs if its of any interest?

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: malcolmbebb via groups.io
Sent: 19 August 2020 11:23
To: motorhome-list@groups.io
Subject: Re: [motorhome-list] temporary holiday sites

 

English country dancing is indeed formulaic, although in England there is a reduced expectation that dancers will know the dances and instruction is normally provided for each dance.

 

Typically the age profile is towards the higher end especially in dance club events. Country dancing is often seen as an old person's activity, unfortunately, although that was not always the case. Some events do address this, perhaps not enough.

 

In the current situation, the older participants are seen as most at risk and therefore most advised not to attend events. Naturally they tend to be more risk averse, too, so taking all together most older dancers that I know have no plans to return to dancing until a vaccine or effective cure is available.

Therefore the main body of participants for many dance events, often also the most keen and likely to attend, are avoiding events until further notice. Thus the critical mass to run events is not available even if the challenging social distancing requirements can be overcome. .

 

I've only been to a couple of C&CC folk club events, but the situation seems pretty similar.

 

I would agree that dancing is good fun, for those able to overcome their inhibitions, and is seen as a good way to keep fit particularly for the "geriatrics".

Morris is similarly affected, in particular by the social distancing requirements, and without dancers musicians are a bit spare...

 

More generally I am hoping to visit a few more temporary holiday sites, I don't think they are well enough known, in the not too distant future, if I don't jump I am expecting to be pushed! So I hope they will still be supported, even if not for dance events.

 

 

Attachments:


Derek Sims
 

In North Devon we have Barn Dances. That's cos we haven't got squares.
At one of these the Head of Languages at the local Comp suddenly shouted out jubilantly, "It's French!" And of course he was right - teachers always are - we've got them in the family, you know.
Doh see Doh must be a bastardized translation of Dos-a-Dos - back-to-back, which is the move described by the caller.
My conjecture is that when the French colonised the Southern part of the US they took their squeeze boxes with them, giving birth to Zydeco music and their calls became Anglicized as the British came to be the dominant ethnic group. Can anyone tell me if I'm right or wrong? And what's it got to do with motorhoming? Dunno, but as any fan of It's a Good Life could tell you, Buffalo girls go round the outside, which must be a reflection on the poor quality of GPS systems in that part of the world
Stay Sane everyone. Only four more days then back to the looney bin. Better get my muzzle ready
Derek

--
Sent from my Android phone with GMX Mail. Please excuse my brevity.

On 19/08/2020, 15:28 Sandytrax <brianinspain12@...> wrote:
I remember the ‘doe see doe’ from my country dancing days in Devon 40 years ago.

Take your partners please!
Brian

On 19 Aug 2020, at 16:32, David Scholes <scholesd@...> wrote:

Clogs are still used for clog dancing but that has nothing to do with English Country Dancing except occasionally as a ‘turn’.

David


On 19 Aug 2020, at 11:35, Tim Sagar via groups.io <t.sagar761@...> wrote:



I know a guy who makes Clogs if its of any interest?

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: malcolmbebb via groups.io
Sent: 19 August 2020 11:23
To: motorhome-list@groups.io
Subject: Re: [motorhome-list] temporary holiday sites

 

English country dancing is indeed formulaic, although in England there is a reduced expectation that dancers will know the dances and instruction is normally provided for each dance.

 

Typically the age profile is towards the higher end especially in dance club events. Country dancing is often seen as an old person's activity, unfortunately, although that was not always the case. Some events do address this, perhaps not enough.

 

In the current situation, the older participants are seen as most at risk and therefore most advised not to attend events. Naturally they tend to be more risk averse, too, so taking all together most older dancers that I know have no plans to return to dancing until a vaccine or effective cure is available.

Therefore the main body of participants for many dance events, often also the most keen and likely to attend, are avoiding events until further notice. Thus the critical mass to run events is not available even if the challenging social distancing requirements can be overcome. .

 

I've only been to a couple of C&CC folk club events, but the situation seems pretty similar.

 

I would agree that dancing is good fun, for those able to overcome their inhibitions, and is seen as a good way to keep fit particularly for the "geriatrics".

Morris is similarly affected, in particular by the social distancing requirements, and without dancers musicians are a bit spare...

 

More generally I am hoping to visit a few more temporary holiday sites, I don't think they are well enough known, in the not too distant future, if I don't jump I am expecting to be pushed! So I hope they will still be supported, even if not for dance events.

 

 

Attachments:


David Scholes
 

Hi

English Country Dancing dates back to the 17th century when a person called Playford recorded many of the dances that people were dancing during that time. It was very popular during the 19th century when many new dances were written. Sometimes the dances were held in barns. My wife and I had a barn dance (in a barn) for our wedding reception with music provided by ‘Bilbo Baggins Barn Dance Band’.

It went over to the colonies probably with the pilgrim fathers. Playford style dances are still danced there especially around Boston area. New dances are still being written but in America they are usually a little different from Playford style and are called ‘contras’ which for some reason use some French ish calls. They should not be used in calling ECD (of which Barn Dances are a form). ‘Do si do‘ should be called as ‘back to back’ and ‘a la main’ should be called as ‘holding hands’.
Another different style developed over there is called ‘square dancing’ in which the caller sings the calls and a further style which is called ‘line dancing’ where you don’t have partners.

Cajun dancing evolved from French Country Dancing.



On 20 Aug 2020, at 09:15, Derek Sims <derek.sims@...> wrote:


In North Devon we have Barn Dances. That's cos we haven't got squares.
At one of these the Head of Languages at the local Comp suddenly shouted out jubilantly, "It's French!" And of course he was right - teachers always are - we've got them in the family, you know.
Doh see Doh must be a bastardized translation of Dos-a-Dos - back-to-back, which is the move described by the caller.
My conjecture is that when the French colonised the Southern part of the US they took their squeeze boxes with them, giving birth to Zydeco music and their calls became Anglicized as the British came to be the dominant ethnic group. Can anyone tell me if I'm right or wrong? And what's it got to do with motorhoming? Dunno, but as any fan of It's a Good Life could tell you, Buffalo girls go round the outside, which must be a reflection on the poor quality of GPS systems in that part of the world
Stay Sane everyone. Only four more days then back to the looney bin. Better get my muzzle ready
Derek

--
Sent from my Android phone with GMX Mail. Please excuse my brevity.
On 19/08/2020, 15:28 Sandytrax <brianinspain12@gmail..com> wrote:
I remember the ‘doe see doe’ from my country dancing days in Devon 40 years ago.

Take your partners please!
Brian


Derek Sims
 

Thanks for that, David. We hired Woolacombe Village Hall for a Barn Dance for our Ruby Wedding, because Tish says I can't do any other type of dancing. She stopped short of saying "any type of dancing", which is probably nearer the truth. Anyway, about a hundred of us had a wonderful time. It helps the atmosphere if no-one knows what they're doing, except probably not for experts like you, David.
Yeehaa
Derek

--
Sent from my Android phone with GMX Mail. Please excuse my brevity.

On 20/08/2020, 10:01 David Scholes <scholesd@...> wrote:
Hi

English Country Dancing dates back to the 17th century when a person called Playford recorded many of the dances that people were dancing during that time. It was very popular during the 19th century when many new dances were written. Sometimes the dances were held in barns. My wife and I had a barn dance (in a barn) for our wedding reception with music provided by ‘Bilbo Baggins Barn Dance Band’.

It went over to the colonies probably with the pilgrim fathers. Playford style dances are still danced there especially around Boston area. New dances are still being written but in America they are usually a little different from Playford style and are called ‘contras’ which for some reason use some French ish calls. They should not be used in calling ECD (of which Barn Dances are a form). ‘Do si do‘ should be called as ‘back to back’ and ‘a la main’ should be called as ‘holding hands’.
Another different style developed over there is called ‘square dancing’ in which the caller sings the calls and a further style which is called ‘line dancing’ where you don’t have partners.

Cajun dancing evolved from French Country Dancing.



On 20 Aug 2020, at 09:15, Derek Sims <derek.sims@...> wrote:


In North Devon we have Barn Dances. That's cos we haven't got squares.
At one of these the Head of Languages at the local Comp suddenly shouted out jubilantly, "It's French!" And of course he was right - teachers always are - we've got them in the family, you know.
Doh see Doh must be a bastardized translation of Dos-a-Dos - back-to-back, which is the move described by the caller.
My conjecture is that when the French colonised the Southern part of the US they took their squeeze boxes with them, giving birth to Zydeco music and their calls became Anglicized as the British came to be the dominant ethnic group. Can anyone tell me if I'm right or wrong? And what's it got to do with motorhoming? Dunno, but as any fan of It's a Good Life could tell you, Buffalo girls go round the outside, which must be a reflection on the poor quality of GPS systems in that part of the world
Stay Sane everyone. Only four more days then back to the looney bin. Better get my muzzle ready
Derek

--
Sent from my Android phone with GMX Mail. Please excuse my brevity.
On 19/08/2020, 15:28 Sandytrax <brianinspain12@gmail..com> wrote:
I remember the ‘doe see doe’ from my country dancing days in Devon 40 years ago.

Take your partners please!
Brian