Topics

future for motorhomes

timsinc Sinclair
 

This is an extract from a message I posted on the OTlist:

I've wondered about the future of motorhoming. The debate on electric
transport - still in its restricting infancy - always seems to focus
on the car. Which, anyway, once they are all battery powered will need
more than 80 terawatt hours of electricity each year, an increase in
the total demand on the national grid by a quarter.

But it's the long-distance users - lorries, coaches, vans and yes
motorhomes - where I've seen little said. However, just been reading
about hydrogen fuel cells which combine hydrogen and oxygen from the
air to produce water, generating electricity. If the hydrogen fuel is
produced through electrolysis using renewable energy, then the process
can have net zero CO₂ emissions.

Hydrogen fuels cells are less energy efficient than batteries, but the
compressed hydrogen tank can be refuelled in less than five minutes.
London has eight hydrogen buses, but there are just 17 hydrogen
refuelling stations in the UK, compared with 15,000 electric vehicle
charging points.

Going to take massive investment and persuasion to get all the filling
station pumps to issue hydrogen instead of petrol or diesel. Still, it
happened with LPG being becoming widely available of which many here
will have taken advantage for van domestic use.

TimS

Alan Morris
 

On Sun, 9 Feb 2020 at 16:00, timsinc Sinclair <timsinc@...> wrote:

Going to take massive investment and persuasion to get all the filling
station pumps to issue hydrogen instead of petrol or diesel. Still, it
happened with LPG being becoming widely available of which many here
will have taken advantage for van domestic use.
Alas their numbers in England are now decreasing. I've frequently
found many closed.

Alan

Carol Weaver
 


Sadly yes. It’s a case of fill up if you pass one!!

Carol


On Sun, 9 Feb 2020 at 16:59, Alan Morris <alan.g4ens@...> wrote:
On Sun, 9 Feb 2020 at 16:00, timsinc Sinclair <timsinc@...> wrote:

> Going to take massive investment and persuasion to get all the filling
> station pumps to issue hydrogen instead of petrol or diesel. Still, it
> happened with LPG being becoming widely available of which many here
> will have taken advantage for van domestic use.

Alas their numbers in England are now decreasing.  I've frequently
found many closed.

Alan



--
--
Carol WeaverAires photos here|. www.carolweaver.co.uk/Travel
Plusnet -cardun if you sign up recommend me please

David Scholes
 

Hi

I also have been considering the future of motorhoming and have arrived at the conclusion that the people at Swansea (whose exact name I forget) have decided to discontinue.

I have no confidence in any future for the hydrogen cycle whether the one that you describe (I understood that the system you describe ran on methanol not pure hydrogen) or the alternative system of burning hydrogen gas in an internal combustion engine. This system is very attractive as it replaces petroleum and results in steam as the exhaust. Unfortunately I had heard that hydrogen was being uncooperative and was insisting on escaping from all such systems within a week which seemed insurmountable.

The electric van that has already been manufactured with a small battery and a rechargeable range of 35 miles (covering most journeys) and with a small petrol engine allowing hybrid charging of the battery for longer journeys seemed hopeful for MH use but it does not conform to the current demand for a totally clean vehicle.

This leaves only totally rechargeable battery vehicles. But even using lithium batteries these would be noticeably heavier than current vehicles. Therefore the bog standard three and a half ton basic MH would become a thing of the past. But Swansea have decreed that as the heart doctors say that I have angina I cannot work for eleven hours a day so I would not be able to do my shift as would be demanded by an employer despite the fact that I am well over 70 and am well retired. This, of course, is because it has been decreed by Swansea that it is not possible for them to conform to the desires of Whitehall and create a second form of heavier vehicle licence because that would need a theoretical test which did not have any questions on tachographs and they can’t think of any such questions).

Therefore all of this is a plot by Swansea to eliminate by stealth all Motorhomes and force us all back to towing caravans and staying on caravan sites (probably on the Gower).

Thank goodness that by 2035 I will probably have outlived my sell by date though I will endeavour to ensure that my MH is still running (possibly by then considered to be a cherished vehicle thus tax free).

David

On 9 Feb 2020, at 16:00, timsinc Sinclair <timsinc@...> wrote:

This is an extract from a message I posted on the OTlist:

I've wondered about the future of motorhoming. The debate on electric
transport - still in its restricting infancy - always seems to focus
on the car. Which, anyway, once they are all battery powered will need
more than 80 terawatt hours of electricity each year, an increase in
the total demand on the national grid by a quarter.

But it's the long-distance users - lorries, coaches, vans and yes
motorhomes - where I've seen little said. However, just been reading
about hydrogen fuel cells which combine hydrogen and oxygen from the
air to produce water, generating electricity. If the hydrogen fuel is
produced through electrolysis using renewable energy, then the process
can have net zero CO₂ emissions.

Hydrogen fuels cells are less energy efficient than batteries, but the
compressed hydrogen tank can be refuelled in less than five minutes.
London has eight hydrogen buses, but there are just 17 hydrogen
refuelling stations in the UK, compared with 15,000 electric vehicle
charging points.

Going to take massive investment and persuasion to get all the filling
station pumps to issue hydrogen instead of petrol or diesel. Still, it
happened with LPG being becoming widely available of which many here
will have taken advantage for van domestic use.

TimS


Brent
 

Hi All
TimS wrote:- But it's the long-distance users - lorries, coaches, vans and yes
motorhomes - where I've seen little said

As fully trained Fiat technician daughter advises us
Wait till they get the vans doing the mileage - then buy electric!!

Brent Windy but calm IoW

Ernest Bull
 

On 9 Feb 2020, at 20:27, David Scholes <scholesd@...> wrote:

I also have been considering the future of motorhoming and have arrived at the conclusion that the
people at Swansea (whose exact name I forget) have decided to discontinue.

In some ways I am with you on the subject, David, and suspect a stitch up by interested parties. Not unknown in Westminster. My view is based upon the indecent and unconsidered rush to demonise the diesel. I have already posted news on the real world testing of Euro6 diesels fitted with SCR - Selective Catalytic Reduction - systems and now, even better EURO6d results are reported here: - 

Which then prompts me to ask why such conclusive scientific evidence is being ignored by those who readily admit to their own ignorance of matters scientific? What is Dominic Cummings up to this time?

Consider also that diesel vehicles have never ever been the main source of the pollutants that threaten lives in our city centres. That dubious honour belongs to our gas fired central heating and hot water boilers. Will they get rid of them too?
___________

ErnB