Topics

But brexit got in the way and we bought an ex-stock Hymer (big mistake).

Brent
 

Hi Alan

Could you enlighten us into more info please?

Must say we will never ever purchase new again

Brent 

Alan Morris
 

On Tue, 24 Sep 2019 at 09:20, Brent <brentiow.c@...> wrote:

Could you enlighten us into more info please?
Which bit brexit or Hymer?

Alan.

Brent
 

Hi Alan

Sorry for confusion - Hymer

Brent

Alan Morris
 

On Wed, 25 Sep 2019 at 10:18, Brent <brentiow.c@...> wrote:

> Hymer

My parents bought my first tent when I was about 10 years old.  I bought my first caravan in 1967 - a new Sprite Alpine for £315.  Many tents and caravans later in 1998, we started to plan for when I would retire in 2003.

As Land Rover enthusiasts we attended a few international LR rallies in 1998, to celebrate LR's 50th Anniversary.  At a week long rally In Germany, we saw many modified LRs converted for various levels of camping comfort.  We decided that we would get a motorhome and started looking.

At one UK MH show, I used my Philips pocket memo recorder to make notes about various MHs, new and s/hand that we saw and liked.  Back home my wife transcribed to paper.  We were both surprised that they were all Hymer.

We looked at many MHs at many places, but none ticked every box, so we decided to build on a commercial vehicle.  No UK company was prepared to quote for building a basic body for us.  Then in my LR I drove to a show at Bad Kissingen, Germany, where I saw many makers of a suitable vehicle and they were built on Land Rovers ideal!

<https://www.abenteuer-allrad.de/en/>

At the end of 2002, we ordered a LR Defender 130 dual cab hi-cap pickup.  Bought from a dealer in The Netherlands as we wanted a LHD, that was not possible in the UK.  I did some of the conversion and a company in Germany built the body, to our specification.

image.png

Unfortunately, in 2011 I developed a major eye problem, resulting in almost five years of inactivity.  As can be seen in the photo, the habitation door is high off the ground.  To lock up at night, I would lock the over-lock on the outside of the door and climb up into the cabin as the step was manual.  In the morning I would jump down to the ground.  (Unfortunately, I had rejected an electrically operated one, incase a flat battery resulted in the step remaining down!)

In those five years, we had both aged more than expected due to lack of any exercise.  So a few modifications, such an electric step, would be required.

In early 2016 we were deciding whether to keep the 14 year old motor, which was EU3, and spend much on updating or buy a new MH.  Brexit forced a quick decision and we bought an ex-stock Hymer EX-SIS T 578 Auto.  After taking delivery and back home, we started to discover disadvantages.

 Only one key fob and not the normal two was supplied.  An extra one would cost about £350, including programming it.

When I weighed it, the payload was very small.  The very thick instruction book advised travelling with an empty fresh water tank.  In the LR we always filled to full at every opportunity.  Like the LR MH, the Hymer has water level indicators in the fresh and grey tanks.  Sadly the Hymer's are useless.  We were able to know very accurately the changing levels in the LR.  I have had to buy a water flow meter for use in filling the Hymer.

During the first night, I discovered that the Thetford toilet would not flush.  In the morning I discovered that the water pump switch above the habitation door switched off the pump, as expected; but there was no bypass switch to keep the Thetford working, as we had on the previous MH.

In the morning the cabin was cold as we woke-up.  Previously, we could reach the simple rotary control switch while still in bed.  In the Hymer with the beds at the back one had to go to the front and over the habitation door to operate a complex digital control system.

We learnt that the insulation of the Hymer was very poor, when compared to the previous MH.  With it arriving back to a cold MH late evening in winter, the heater would only need to run for 5 to 10 minutes before the cabin became too hot.  The Hymer takes a very long time and needs to be kept running.

The Hymer fridge uses LPG at an alarming rate and together with the poor insulation, we need to refill both 11kg Gaslow cylinders after a couple of winter weekends.  In the LR, it could last for 18 months before needing a refill of it's 2 x 11kg Gaslows.

To have a shower in the LR MH,one could go into the wet room, undress and place ones clothes in a dry place.  Then pull the shower curtain around and have a shower.  Then reach through a gap and grab a towel off a hook and dry oneself etc. before leaving the wet room.

In the Hymer one has to undress in the middle of the cabin having relocated a rigid wall and placed it across the middle of the wet room.  Enter the shower area and close the wet room door.  After showering, one has to step out of the wet room, then relocate the wall to be able to remove ones towel from it's hook in the wet room.  Discussing this recently on a CMC site with another Hymer retired couple, they told me that they never use their shower, always using the campsite's.

In 2016 how many MH users don't use a mobile phone, tablet or laptop?  Hymer makes no provision for charging these devices.  There is only one 12 volt socket, fitted on the side of the kitchen worktop.  No USB socket.  So adaptors and a collection of cables have to dangle in the doorway while being charged.  The domestic battery compartment, accessed from outside, is below a passenger seat behind the table.  I would expect multiple 12 volt sockets and multiple USB sockets be to available for devices on the table.

As well as the driver's and navigator's swivel seats, there are two seat belted seats facing forward behind the table.  There is only leg room for one at this corner bench seat.  To make room for the fourth seat belted person's legs, one has to crawl under the table that is not removable.  Then remove the side facing 5th seat base and backrest.  Then remove the under seat cupboard top and also it's front panel, or sit with the left leg inside the cupboard with the right leg outside.  Using this cupboard to store anything is not practical as it's access is extremely difficult.

Clearly Hymer have used separate designers (teams or individuals) for the many parts of the MH, without any coming together before proceeding to manufacture.  No experience of use has been used in the design - but it looks great in a showroom!

The Hymer has a factory fitted (not Lowdhams installed) TV dish system.  After using it for a while, I checked the battery voltages in the display panel above the habitation door.  The pair of habitation batteries (I had Lowdhams install a second battery in the provided position) were almost fully charged, but the starter battery was low.  Why did the Hymer factory connect the TV system to the starter battery?

Fortunately, I had Lowdhams install a solar panel with a controller that diverted power to the starter battery when the habitation battery was full.  I would add that Lowdhams failed to locate this controller, as indicated in the manufacturer's documentation, close to the battery.  It was located in a roof locker close the the solar panel.  Thus the battery never gets a full charge due to voltage drop on the long cable between controller and battery.

While mentioning Lowdhams failures, they did not complete the Gaslow installation correctly.  They fitted the wrong SOG product, drilling a hole in the cassette emptying cap rather than over the pressure vent's bayonet non-drill correct place.  When I advised them, I was told that it was correct.  It took months before they accepted their mistake and corrected it.  Even then they failed to give us the required blanking cap, until we complained again.

Twice on habitation annual checks Lowdhams have messed about with the Hymer/Fiat built-in GPS/radio/rear camera system.  The first time the system crashed.  It's a Windows CE embedded system and as a PC expert, I was able to download from the maker's website the files required to get it working again.  The second time, it would appear that Lowdhams disconnected the starter battery (the cab floor cover had not been re-fitted correctly).  I had to reset all the options as there had been a factory cold reset.  Lowdhams denied this, but the evidence suggests that I was was correct.

The final problem is that being LR owners we are used to the advantages of a 4x4.  The Fiat is font wheel drive and not very good on less than perfect sites.  We have almost traction on a few campsites and on one we required the owner's tractor to pull us out.  We have therefore lost faith in driving on any ground that is not perfect!  Otherwise the Fiat is an excellent base cab and handles very well.

Alan.

Carol Weaver
 

ALAN

We bought a new spare cassette and whilst here in Germany we happened on the SOG factory and wanted a new cap for it to fit the SOG. It is in the end cap unlike the 200 model.  

Carol

On Wed, 25 Sep 2019 at 22:27, Alan Morris <alan.g4ens@...> wrote:
On Wed, 25 Sep 2019 at 10:18, Brent <brentiow.c@...> wrote:

> Hymer

My parents bought my first tent when I was about 10 years old.  I bought my first caravan in 1967 - a new Sprite Alpine for £315.  Many tents and caravans later in 1998, we started to plan for when I would retire in 2003.

As Land Rover enthusiasts we attended a few international LR rallies in 1998, to celebrate LR's 50th Anniversary.  At a week long rally In Germany, we saw many modified LRs converted for various levels of camping comfort.  We decided that we would get a motorhome and started looking.

At one UK MH show, I used my Philips pocket memo recorder to make notes about various MHs, new and s/hand that we saw and liked.  Back home my wife transcribed to paper.  We were both surprised that they were all Hymer.

We looked at many MHs at many places, but none ticked every box, so we decided to build on a commercial vehicle.  No UK company was prepared to quote for building a basic body for us.  Then in my LR I drove to a show at Bad Kissingen, Germany, where I saw many makers of a suitable vehicle and they were built on Land Rovers ideal!

<https://www.abenteuer-allrad.de/en/>

At the end of 2002, we ordered a LR Defender 130 dual cab hi-cap pickup.  Bought from a dealer in The Netherlands as we wanted a LHD, that was not possible in the UK.  I did some of the conversion and a company in Germany built the body, to our specification.

image.png

Unfortunately, in 2011 I developed a major eye problem, resulting in almost five years of inactivity.  As can be seen in the photo, the habitation door is high off the ground.  To lock up at night, I would lock the over-lock on the outside of the door and climb up into the cabin as the step was manual.  In the morning I would jump down to the ground.  (Unfortunately, I had rejected an electrically operated one, incase a flat battery resulted in the step remaining down!)

In those five years, we had both aged more than expected due to lack of any exercise.  So a few modifications, such an electric step, would be required.

In early 2016 we were deciding whether to keep the 14 year old motor, which was EU3, and spend much on updating or buy a new MH.  Brexit forced a quick decision and we bought an ex-stock Hymer EX-SIS T 578 Auto.  After taking delivery and back home, we started to discover disadvantages.

 Only one key fob and not the normal two was supplied.  An extra one would cost about £350, including programming it.

When I weighed it, the payload was very small.  The very thick instruction book advised travelling with an empty fresh water tank.  In the LR we always filled to full at every opportunity.  Like the LR MH, the Hymer has water level indicators in the fresh and grey tanks.  Sadly the Hymer's are useless.  We were able to know very accurately the changing levels in the LR.  I have had to buy a water flow meter for use in filling the Hymer.

During the first night, I discovered that the Thetford toilet would not flush.  In the morning I discovered that the water pump switch above the habitation door switched off the pump, as expected; but there was no bypass switch to keep the Thetford working, as we had on the previous MH.

In the morning the cabin was cold as we woke-up.  Previously, we could reach the simple rotary control switch while still in bed.  In the Hymer with the beds at the back one had to go to the front and over the habitation door to operate a complex digital control system.

We learnt that the insulation of the Hymer was very poor, when compared to the previous MH.  With it arriving back to a cold MH late evening in winter, the heater would only need to run for 5 to 10 minutes before the cabin became too hot.  The Hymer takes a very long time and needs to be kept running.

The Hymer fridge uses LPG at an alarming rate and together with the poor insulation, we need to refill both 11kg Gaslow cylinders after a couple of winter weekends.  In the LR, it could last for 18 months before needing a refill of it's 2 x 11kg Gaslows.

To have a shower in the LR MH,one could go into the wet room, undress and place ones clothes in a dry place.  Then pull the shower curtain around and have a shower.  Then reach through a gap and grab a towel off a hook and dry oneself etc. before leaving the wet room.

In the Hymer one has to undress in the middle of the cabin having relocated a rigid wall and placed it across the middle of the wet room.  Enter the shower area and close the wet room door.  After showering, one has to step out of the wet room, then relocate the wall to be able to remove ones towel from it's hook in the wet room.  Discussing this recently on a CMC site with another Hymer retired couple, they told me that they never use their shower, always using the campsite's.

In 2016 how many MH users don't use a mobile phone, tablet or laptop?  Hymer makes no provision for charging these devices.  There is only one 12 volt socket, fitted on the side of the kitchen worktop.  No USB socket.  So adaptors and a collection of cables have to dangle in the doorway while being charged.  The domestic battery compartment, accessed from outside, is below a passenger seat behind the table.  I would expect multiple 12 volt sockets and multiple USB sockets be to available for devices on the table.

As well as the driver's and navigator's swivel seats, there are two seat belted seats facing forward behind the table.  There is only leg room for one at this corner bench seat.  To make room for the fourth seat belted person's legs, one has to crawl under the table that is not removable.  Then remove the side facing 5th seat base and backrest.  Then remove the under seat cupboard top and also it's front panel, or sit with the left leg inside the cupboard with the right leg outside.  Using this cupboard to store anything is not practical as it's access is extremely difficult.

Clearly Hymer have used separate designers (teams or individuals) for the many parts of the MH, without any coming together before proceeding to manufacture.  No experience of use has been used in the design - but it looks great in a showroom!

The Hymer has a factory fitted (not Lowdhams installed) TV dish system.  After using it for a while, I checked the battery voltages in the display panel above the habitation door.  The pair of habitation batteries (I had Lowdhams install a second battery in the provided position) were almost fully charged, but the starter battery was low.  Why did the Hymer factory connect the TV system to the starter battery?

Fortunately, I had Lowdhams install a solar panel with a controller that diverted power to the starter battery when the habitation battery was full.  I would add that Lowdhams failed to locate this controller, as indicated in the manufacturer's documentation, close to the battery.  It was located in a roof locker close the the solar panel.  Thus the battery never gets a full charge due to voltage drop on the long cable between controller and battery.

While mentioning Lowdhams failures, they did not complete the Gaslow installation correctly.  They fitted the wrong SOG product, drilling a hole in the cassette emptying cap rather than over the pressure vent's bayonet non-drill correct place.  When I advised them, I was told that it was correct.  It took months before they accepted their mistake and corrected it.  Even then they failed to give us the required blanking cap, until we complained again.

Twice on habitation annual checks Lowdhams have messed about with the Hymer/Fiat built-in GPS/radio/rear camera system.  The first time the system crashed.  It's a Windows CE embedded system and as a PC expert, I was able to download from the maker's website the files required to get it working again.  The second time, it would appear that Lowdhams disconnected the starter battery (the cab floor cover had not been re-fitted correctly).  I had to reset all the options as there had been a factory cold reset.  Lowdhams denied this, but the evidence suggests that I was was correct.

The final problem is that being LR owners we are used to the advantages of a 4x4.  The Fiat is font wheel drive and not very good on less than perfect sites.  We have almost traction on a few campsites and on one we required the owner's tractor to pull us out.  We have therefore lost faith in driving on any ground that is not perfect!  Otherwise the Fiat is an excellent base cab and handles very well.

Alan.

Attachments:

--
--
Carol WeaverAires photos here|. www.carolweaver.co.uk/Travel
Plusnet -cardun if you sign up recommend me please

Neill King \(MH-List\)
 

Thank heavens my Hymer hasn’t been like that!  Most of my problems related to the Fiat part.

 

We talk to quite a few owners here and I can say buying motorhomes does seem to be a bit of a lottery – they are mostly made up of numerous bought-in parts cobbled together by the motorhome ‘manufacturer’ and the reliability of those can vary from year to year.  I too have had Dometic Fridge problems but quite different to Alan’s.

 

There should be a warning akin to the financial sector - ‘past reputation is no guide to the future’ !

 

Best regards

Neill
------------------------------------------------------------
www.motorcaravanning.co.uk 01789-778825 551345165

neill@... motorcaravanning@...

--------------------------------------------------------------------------
On-line motorhome parts & accessory shop with added information

 

 

 

From: motorhome-list@groups.io [mailto:motorhome-list@groups.io] On Behalf Of Alan Morris
Sent: 25 September 2019 21:27
To: motorhome-list@groups.io
Subject: Re: [motorhome-list] But brexit got in the way and we bought an ex-stock Hymer (big mistake).

 

On Wed, 25 Sep 2019 at 10:18, Brent <brentiow.c@...> wrote:

> Hymer

My parents bought my first tent when I was about 10 years old.  I bought my first caravan in 1967 - a new Sprite Alpine for £315.  Many tents and caravans later in 1998, we started to plan for when I would retire in 2003.

As Land Rover enthusiasts we attended a few international LR rallies in 1998, to celebrate LR's 50th Anniversary.  At a week long rally In Germany, we saw many modified LRs converted for various levels of camping comfort.  We decided that we would get a motorhome and started looking.

At one UK MH show, I used my Philips pocket memo recorder to make notes about various MHs, new and s/hand that we saw and liked.  Back home my wife transcribed to paper.  We were both surprised that they were all Hymer.

We looked at many MHs at many places, but none ticked every box, so we decided to build on a commercial vehicle.  No UK company was prepared to quote for building a basic body for us.  Then in my LR I drove to a show at Bad Kissingen, Germany, where I saw many makers of a suitable vehicle and they were built on Land Rovers ideal!

<https://www.abenteuer-allrad.de/en/>

 

At the end of 2002, we ordered a LR Defender 130 dual cab hi-cap pickup.  Bought from a dealer in The Netherlands as we wanted a LHD, that was not possible in the UK.  I did some of the conversion and a company in Germany built the body, to our specification.

 

 

Unfortunately, in 2011 I developed a major eye problem, resulting in almost five years of inactivity.  As can be seen in the photo, the habitation door is high off the ground.  To lock up at night, I would lock the over-lock on the outside of the door and climb up into the cabin as the step was manual.  In the morning I would jump down to the ground.  (Unfortunately, I had rejected an electrically operated one, incase a flat battery resulted in the step remaining down!)

 

In those five years, we had both aged more than expected due to lack of any exercise.  So a few modifications, such an electric step, would be required.

 

In early 2016 we were deciding whether to keep the 14 year old motor, which was EU3, and spend much on updating or buy a new MH.  Brexit forced a quick decision and we bought an ex-stock Hymer EX-SIS T 578 Auto.  After taking delivery and back home, we started to discover disadvantages.

 

 Only one key fob and not the normal two was supplied.  An extra one would cost about £350, including programming it.

 

When I weighed it, the payload was very small.  The very thick instruction book advised travelling with an empty fresh water tank.  In the LR we always filled to full at every opportunity.  Like the LR MH, the Hymer has water level indicators in the fresh and grey tanks.  Sadly the Hymer's are useless.  We were able to know very accurately the changing levels in the LR.  I have had to buy a water flow meter for use in filling the Hymer.

 

During the first night, I discovered that the Thetford toilet would not flush.  In the morning I discovered that the water pump switch above the habitation door switched off the pump, as expected; but there was no bypass switch to keep the Thetford working, as we had on the previous MH.

 

In the morning the cabin was cold as we woke-up.  Previously, we could reach the simple rotary control switch while still in bed.  In the Hymer with the beds at the back one had to go to the front and over the habitation door to operate a complex digital control system.

 

We learnt that the insulation of the Hymer was very poor, when compared to the previous MH.  With it arriving back to a cold MH late evening in winter, the heater would only need to run for 5 to 10 minutes before the cabin became too hot.  The Hymer takes a very long time and needs to be kept running.

 

The Hymer fridge uses LPG at an alarming rate and together with the poor insulation, we need to refill both 11kg Gaslow cylinders after a couple of winter weekends.  In the LR, it could last for 18 months before needing a refill of it's 2 x 11kg Gaslows.

 

To have a shower in the LR MH,one could go into the wet room, undress and place ones clothes in a dry place.  Then pull the shower curtain around and have a shower.  Then reach through a gap and grab a towel off a hook and dry oneself etc. before leaving the wet room.

 

In the Hymer one has to undress in the middle of the cabin having relocated a rigid wall and placed it across the middle of the wet room.  Enter the shower area and close the wet room door.  After showering, one has to step out of the wet room, then relocate the wall to be able to remove ones towel from it's hook in the wet room.  Discussing this recently on a CMC site with another Hymer retired couple, they told me that they never use their shower, always using the campsite's.

 

In 2016 how many MH users don't use a mobile phone, tablet or laptop?  Hymer makes no provision for charging these devices.  There is only one 12 volt socket, fitted on the side of the kitchen worktop.  No USB socket.  So adaptors and a collection of cables have to dangle in the doorway while being charged.  The domestic battery compartment, accessed from outside, is below a passenger seat behind the table.  I would expect multiple 12 volt sockets and multiple USB sockets be to available for devices on the table.

 

As well as the driver's and navigator's swivel seats, there are two seat belted seats facing forward behind the table.  There is only leg room for one at this corner bench seat.  To make room for the fourth seat belted person's legs, one has to crawl under the table that is not removable.  Then remove the side facing 5th seat base and backrest.  Then remove the under seat cupboard top and also it's front panel, or sit with the left leg inside the cupboard with the right leg outside.  Using this cupboard to store anything is not practical as it's access is extremely difficult.

 

Clearly Hymer have used separate designers (teams or individuals) for the many parts of the MH, without any coming together before proceeding to manufacture.  No experience of use has been used in the design - but it looks great in a showroom!

 

The Hymer has a factory fitted (not Lowdhams installed) TV dish system.  After using it for a while, I checked the battery voltages in the display panel above the habitation door.  The pair of habitation batteries (I had Lowdhams install a second battery in the provided position) were almost fully charged, but the starter battery was low.  Why did the Hymer factory connect the TV system to the starter battery?

 

Fortunately, I had Lowdhams install a solar panel with a controller that diverted power to the starter battery when the habitation battery was full.  I would add that Lowdhams failed to locate this controller, as indicated in the manufacturer's documentation, close to the battery.  It was located in a roof locker close the the solar panel.  Thus the battery never gets a full charge due to voltage drop on the long cable between controller and battery.

 

While mentioning Lowdhams failures, they did not complete the Gaslow installation correctly.  They fitted the wrong SOG product, drilling a hole in the cassette emptying cap rather than over the pressure vent's bayonet non-drill correct place.  When I advised them, I was told that it was correct.  It took months before they accepted their mistake and corrected it.  Even then they failed to give us the required blanking cap, until we complained again.

 

Twice on habitation annual checks Lowdhams have messed about with the Hymer/Fiat built-in GPS/radio/rear camera system.  The first time the system crashed.  It's a Windows CE embedded system and as a PC expert, I was able to download from the maker's website the files required to get it working again.  The second time, it would appear that Lowdhams disconnected the starter battery (the cab floor cover had not been re-fitted correctly).  I had to reset all the options as there had been a factory cold reset.  Lowdhams denied this, but the evidence suggests that I was was correct.

 

The final problem is that being LR owners we are used to the advantages of a 4x4.  The Fiat is font wheel drive and not very good on less than perfect sites.  We have almost traction on a few campsites and on one we required the owner's tractor to pull us out.  We have therefore lost faith in driving on any ground that is not perfect!  Otherwise the Fiat is an excellent base cab and handles very well.

 

Alan.

 

Attachments:

timsinc Sinclair
 

On 26/09/2019, Neill King &#92;(MH-List&#92;)
<yahoo@...> wrote:

We talk to quite a few owners here and I can say buying motorhomes does seem
to be a bit of a lottery – they are mostly made up of numerous bought-in
parts cobbled together by the motorhome ‘manufacturer’ and the reliability
of those can vary from year to year.
So true. The side windows on my Westfalia camper are Dometic (some
giving minor problems) the opening rooflights Remis. The boiler
Eberspacher, it's top-up tank Aldis, its electronic controls
Westfalia. The hob Smev. The kitchen units, well could be B&Q. The
fridge Isotherm (ever heard of them?) The 12v in/output black box
thing definitely Westfalia. Works great, even charging engine as well
as leisure batteries - until it gets fried by dodgy Moroccan campsite
hookup.

TimS

Brent
 

Hi Alan

Very many thanks for your detailed reply/explanation, sorry took so long to respond

Will explain our tale of woes in couple of months as we've just traded it in and they may belong to this site!!!!!

Very best wishes

Brian Reay
 

I follow a number of motorhome related groups and it seems virtually all the motorhome makers/converters have their quality issues.

Some customers seem particularly unlucky (I'm not suggesting more than that) and have a string of issues- some of which take forever to be resolved. Others either are extremely lucky, don't notice problems, or overlook them. 

Likewise, some manufacturers seem to have worse reputations than others. British companies seem, based on my observations, to fair worse than continental ones. Whether this is a valid point or due to some other factor I can't be sure. 

Our first mh had a few minor parts missing, all of which should have been spotted by the converter (Swift) before it was released to the dealer (the electric step, a part from the bed, a seat belt cover). Two of these at least should certainly have been spotted by the dealer before delivery.  Later a leak developed due to poor design in the routing of a waste pipe- it rubbed on the rear tyre. The fixing was totally inadequate- it must occur on every similar vehicle.  As for the radio reception, it was dreadful. Again, due to poor design by Swift who had fitted a totally inadequate antenna. Moreover, it was on ongoing issue in a number of vehicles due to a lack of understanding of the issues. 

Our current mh is a Rapido. We've not had any real issues with it - we've had it just under a year. Fuel filling is a bit of a pain, the pumps (regardless of where I fill up) tend to cut out unless I trickle the fuel in.  A few of the trim parts which push in have popped out around the blinds etc but they push back.  Conversely, another owner on the FB group seems to have a 'Lemon' and is very unhappy with his new Rapido.  

A relative has owned several new motorhomes and has had a number of post delivery issues- including serious plumbing problems. Again most seem to be due to poor pre-delivery quality checks.

Brian


peter walker
 

Hi Brian,
We have had five new vans over 40 years all with minor /annoying faults so I guess that we have been lucky, three of them were various auto sleepers and the Marquis Lancashire was perhaps the worst but most of the faults on that were after fit dealer item's, we run the van in traveling backwards and forwards to them. Birmingham/Tewksbury.
Our latest van 2015 is a Elddis sunseeker 115 from Westcountry motorhomes so we took a gamble on both the make and dealer as it is a 130 one way trip to get things fixed, but is by far the best van that we have ever had regarding the lack of faults, I agree however that somethings no matter how small should not of got past Elddis quality inspection or WCM PDI.
Pete 

timsinc Sinclair
 

I agree with your general observations, Brian. I bought 2nd-hand
Rapido A-class and lived in it full-time for two years and cannot
remember one fault, but maybe old age dimming memory! Interestingly,
guy who bought it from me (I sold to buy a canal boat) said of the
many he had scoured ads for was attracted by the fact that I was a
full-timer. I'd have sorted any possible faults and added all items
required for home-living. Which I had - sat dish, solar, tow-bar for
A-frame, extra batteries, and underfloor gas tanks.

Contrast that with one of my very early vans - a British-made Compass
Drifter. After three years the whole of the 'Luton' front end needed
rebuilding. It had rotted thanks to water ingress. Inbetween I've had
a Laika and a Hobby. Afraid not kept a record of faults of those!
Personal experience, though, saw me clear steer of British-made.

Today I live in a German-made Westfalia camper on a T5. It's an
amazing clever design of a home-for-one in an easy-supermarket-parking
runaround. And I don't worry about sat-nav thinking I'm a car! But
it's had its faults - such as water pump failing twice and, the most
expensive, its diesel heater needing replacing. All the rest, though,
seems to be working fine in its fifth year.

TimS

On 03/10/2019, Brian Reay via Groups.Io <g8osn=yahoo.co.uk@groups.io> wrote:
I follow a number of motorhome related groups and it seems virtually all the
motorhome makers/converters have their quality issues.

Some customers seem particularly unlucky (I'm not suggesting more than that)
and have a string of issues- some of which take forever to be resolved.
Others either are extremely lucky, don't notice problems, or overlook them.

Likewise, some manufacturers seem to have worse reputations than others.
British companies seem, based on my observations, to fair worse than
continental ones. Whether this is a valid point or due to some other factor
I can't be sure.

Our first mh had a few minor parts missing, all of which should have been
spotted by the converter (Swift) before it was released to the dealer (the
electric step, a part from the bed, a seat belt cover). Two of these at
least should certainly have been spotted by the dealer before delivery.
Later a leak developed due to poor design in the routing of a waste pipe- it
rubbed on the rear tyre. The fixing was totally inadequate- it must occur on
every similar vehicle. As for the radio reception, it was dreadful. Again,
due to poor design by Swift who had fitted a totally inadequate antenna.
Moreover, it was on ongoing issue in a number of vehicles due to a lack of
understanding of the issues.

Our current mh is a Rapido. We've not had any real issues with it - we've
had it just under a year. Fuel filling is a bit of a pain, the pumps
(regardless of where I fill up) tend to cut out unless I trickle the fuel
in. A few of the trim parts which push in have popped out around the blinds
etc but they push back. Conversely, another owner on the FB group seems to
have a 'Lemon' and is very unhappy with his new Rapido.

A relative has owned several new motorhomes and has had a number of post
delivery issues- including serious plumbing problems. Again most seem to be
due to poor pre-delivery quality checks.

Brian



--

*It'll all be OK in the end. If it's not OK, it's not the end*

Alan Morris
 

On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 at 13:37, timsinc Sinclair <timsinc@...> wrote:

I agree with your general observations, Brian.
I've found British built (motor) caravans to be generally poor quality.

I remember visiting a dealer in Suffolk about 4 years ago. On
entering their car park, we saw a visiting service vehicle close to a
new British MH on display for selling. The over cab window/roof light
seal was being repaired.

Another British MH we were looking over had a rear wide opening door
with a top hinge. After exiting via this door, I noticed about 80mm
of screw thread sticking out. Rather dangerous if one hit it.

I've previously mentioned many Hymer problems, but they are all DESIGN
faults and not build or QC problems.

The problems have been with Loudham, before delivery, installed
options. Loudham's workshop manager and staff do not have much
experience and knowledge of the products they sell and install. OK,
I'm 76 next month and have been caravaning since 1967, but have
significantly more experience and knowledge of the options I wanted
installed. But I'm a retired electronics eng. and have not worked in
the caravan industry!

The Hymer had a re-call on the central part of the bedding support.
It's two single with a 2/3 cushion between. We don't use the other
1/3 cushion and it is stored at home for when we sell.

One LED light over a bed was faulty, Loudhams could not understand
the problem. The LED was always on at a very low level and only
visible in low light conditions i.e. all windows and roof lights
covered with their OEM blinds etc. I explained that the electronic
touch/touch on/off switch had a leaky component. They told me that
this was not a fault. Eventually, they reluctantly referred to Hymer
for a replacement, which solved the problem. Both were reasonably to
be expected minor problems.

The habitation step was damaged by Loudhams during a service.
Loudhams require customers to present MHs to their display showroom
site. They then inspect the MH for any body damage. The MH is then
driven a few miles to their service location to be worked on and then
driven back to the showroom, using the customers diesel!

Then the MH is presented to the customer to confirm that there is no
body damage. Then I saw that the step was down. Pressing the raise
switch did not work. We had to leave the MH with them (fortunately my
wife had followed me in our small car as we were visiting a local NT
while waiting) overnight for a repair. The shear pin had to be
replaced.

We both later discussed the problem and the 'body language' of the
staff. We were 100% certain that the damage had occurred at the
workshop, but covered it up. We guessed that the driver needed our MH
for his journey back to the salesroom!

We have used winches with shear pins and know that they don't fail
unless over-loaded.

Alan.

Ernest Bull
 

On 3 Oct 2019, at 19:08, Alan Morris <alan.g4ens@...> wrote:

I've previously mentioned many Hymer problems, but they are all DESIGN
faults and not build or QC problems.

My Hymer Tramp had a persistent leak. The side bench cushions were getting soaked and one could watch the water trickle from the bottom of the sliding side window, I took it back to Germany several times and they fiddled with the side window. Fitting new rubbers and so on, but it kept happening. 

Years later, I found the real problem. The water was getting in under the corner edge beading on the roof. It was running down inside the wall (The locker was dry and no sign of wet.) and leaking onto the top of the side window frame, then all round the frame and out onto the inside wall and down behind the back cushion. Easily fixed using Capt. Tolley’s Creeping Crack Cure: - 
________

ErnB

yorkcov
 

I've had a secondhand Murvi Morello followed by a new one 4 years ago and not a fault in either of them. So I can recommend 'some' british manufacturers.
AlanY

On 3 October 2019 19:08:09 BST, Alan Morris <alan.g4ens@...> wrote:
On Thu, 3 Oct 2019 at 13:37, timsinc Sinclair <timsinc@...>
wrote:

I agree with your general observations, Brian.
I've found British built (motor) caravans to be generally poor quality.

I remember visiting a dealer in Suffolk about 4 years ago. On
entering their car park, we saw a visiting service vehicle close to a
new British MH on display for selling. The over cab window/roof light
seal was being repaired.

Another British MH we were looking over had a rear wide opening door
with a top hinge. After exiting via this door, I noticed about 80mm
of screw thread sticking out. Rather dangerous if one hit it.

I've previously mentioned many Hymer problems, but they are all DESIGN
faults and not build or QC problems.

The problems have been with Loudham, before delivery, installed
options. Loudham's workshop manager and staff do not have much
experience and knowledge of the products they sell and install. OK,
I'm 76 next month and have been caravaning since 1967, but have
significantly more experience and knowledge of the options I wanted
installed. But I'm a retired electronics eng. and have not worked in
the caravan industry!

The Hymer had a re-call on the central part of the bedding support.
It's two single with a 2/3 cushion between. We don't use the other
1/3 cushion and it is stored at home for when we sell.

One LED light over a bed was faulty, Loudhams could not understand
the problem. The LED was always on at a very low level and only
visible in low light conditions i.e. all windows and roof lights
covered with their OEM blinds etc. I explained that the electronic
touch/touch on/off switch had a leaky component. They told me that
this was not a fault. Eventually, they reluctantly referred to Hymer
for a replacement, which solved the problem. Both were reasonably to
be expected minor problems.

The habitation step was damaged by Loudhams during a service.
Loudhams require customers to present MHs to their display showroom
site. They then inspect the MH for any body damage. The MH is then
driven a few miles to their service location to be worked on and then
driven back to the showroom, using the customers diesel!

Then the MH is presented to the customer to confirm that there is no
body damage. Then I saw that the step was down. Pressing the raise
switch did not work. We had to leave the MH with them (fortunately my
wife had followed me in our small car as we were visiting a local NT
while waiting) overnight for a repair. The shear pin had to be
replaced.

We both later discussed the problem and the 'body language' of the
staff. We were 100% certain that the damage had occurred at the
workshop, but covered it up. We guessed that the driver needed our MH
for his journey back to the salesroom!

We have used winches with shear pins and know that they don't fail
unless over-loaded.

Alan.