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How to get started learning code with Morserino

Roland
 

Now that my kit has arrived and been built what is the suggested way to get started learning morse code as an absolut beginner ?
Any learning guidance very welcome .

Thanks, 73 Roland

Willi, OE1WKL
 

Roland,

Of course there are many ways leading to success, and you have to find a way that suits YOU (so be careful what others are telling you - it might be good advice, but it might also be not th right thing for you).

Although this is against „old school“ teaching, I suggest you start with a paddle and not a manual key, and you start keying right from the beginning. The following could be a starting point for using teh Morserino:

Example Koch Training Program


Start with Koch Lesson 1, and then do for each lesson:

• Koch Trainer Learn new Character (set speed to 15 WpM or slightly higher):
• listen to the new character several times, trying to memorize the sound pattern
• Repeat new character saying dit and dah (e.g. di-dah for an A)
• Using the paddle enter the new character with the paddle, until you can do this without problems

• Koch Trainer CW Generator - Random (15 - 17 WpM, Length Random Grp = 1, Interword Space = 20 up to 30), often, about 5 minutes each session
• Listen to characters and write them down
• Listen to characters and speak them with dits and dahs

  3. Koch Trainer Echo Trainer, settings as above, but interword space = 7 to 9 , length random gap = 2 to 5
• Repeat the heard characters with the paddle, calling them out loud when you hear them (as „A“, „K“ etc)

Do 2 and 3 often, until you are really confident and not making many mistakes anymore.

Beginning with lesson 5, you should add the following (set speed and itnerword space so that it is doable, but challenging for you):
  4.  Koch Trainer CW Generator - CW Abbrevs and / or English words (set max length in the beginning to 3, later to 4, 5, 6 etc)
• Listen and write them down
• Listen and repeat them out loud (spelling the words as you hear them in Morse code)
  5. Koch Trainer Echo Trainer - CW Abbrevs and/or English words, length as above
• Repeat the heard words with the paddle, calling them out loud (decoding them in your head) when you hear them

It is important to have a speed of at least 15 WpM - as soon as you feel confident with that speed, you could increase it slowly to 16, 17 or 18 WpM. Set inter-word space to a level that you can manage.
You should do some training each day - and be it only for 5 - 10 minutes.

When you have learned all characters (gone through all Koch lessons), you can start to increase your speed, and to decrease inter-word spacing.

You will see soon what is working for you, and what is not - so by all means modify your training program accordingly.

Hope this helps!

73
Willi


Roland
 

Thanks Willi, great advise, all makes sense. I already started with the Koch lessons 1-3, since this seemed logical to me. Started with 18WPM and the default settings. So far I find it rather addictive to practice with the Morserino-32 hihi. Always missed the keying part with other CW learning methods.

Thanks agn
VY 73
Roland

Matthew Pullan
 

I would echo what Willi says about finding the right approach for you. I would also point out that you do not have to limit yourself to only using the Morserino-32. I think Morse Machine for Android is a great app for learning the alphabet and has all the main letter sequences that the Morserino uses.
          de OE6FEG
                  Matt


From: morserino@groups.io <morserino@groups.io> on behalf of Roland <roland@...>
Sent: Monday, May 20, 2019 5:50:20 PM
To: morserino@groups.io
Subject: Re: [morserino] How to get started learning code with Morserino
 
Thanks Willi, great advise, all makes sense. I already started with the Koch lessons 1-3, since this seemed logical to me. Started with 18WPM and the default settings. So far I find it rather addictive to practice with the Morserino-32 hihi. Always missed the keying part with other CW learning methods.

Thanks agn
VY 73
Roland

Roland
 

Matthew, to complement morserino I am practicing copy2head with morsedx.com (formerly morsefusion). What I really like about morserino is the keying part besides listening to the sounds of the characters. It motivates me to do better and better each time. Almost like a computer game of some sort. Motivation is the key when learning something new, I hope I can keep it up ;-)

Thanks for all your valuable advice guys ! keep em coming.

73
Roland, HB9VQQ

Tom Parish
 

Ya i think he really hit the mark with this training kit.

BTW ... I took the CWOps.org classes not long ago. They are free. I highly recommend those. They start up again in the Fall.  Get yourself on the list (likely for CWops 2) and they can help you turbo charge your abilities.

Tom KB5RF


On Mon, May 20, 2019 at 10:50 AM Roland <roland@...> wrote:
Thanks Willi, great advise, all makes sense. I already started with the Koch lessons 1-3, since this seemed logical to me. Started with 18WPM and the default settings. So far I find it rather addictive to practice with the Morserino-32 hihi. Always missed the keying part with other CW learning methods.

Thanks agn
VY 73
Roland



--

Inspire Curiosity Together
TomParish.com
512-
497-5046 

Matthew Pullan
 

Ah yes, Morse-dx is what I used and it really works. Now I read books in Morse on my way to work. It complements the Morserino well, which helps get the sending right, rather than just the copying.
           73 de OE6FEG
                    Matt
              


From: morserino@groups.io <morserino@groups.io> on behalf of Tom Parish <tom.parish@...>
Sent: Monday, May 20, 2019 6:00:36 PM
To: morserino@groups.io
Subject: Re: [morserino] How to get started learning code with Morserino
 
Ya i think he really hit the mark with this training kit.

BTW ... I took the CWOps.org classes not long ago. They are free. I highly recommend those. They start up again in the Fall.  Get yourself on the list (likely for CWops 2) and they can help you turbo charge your abilities.

Tom KB5RF


On Mon, May 20, 2019 at 10:50 AM Roland <roland@...> wrote:
Thanks Willi, great advise, all makes sense. I already started with the Koch lessons 1-3, since this seemed logical to me. Started with 18WPM and the default settings. So far I find it rather addictive to practice with the Morserino-32 hihi. Always missed the keying part with other CW learning methods.

Thanks agn
VY 73
Roland



--

Inspire Curiosity Together
TomParish.com
512-
497-5046 

Kent Trimble, K9ZTV
 

Willi . . .

Great post.

I used to think so, too (e.g., starting students out on a paddle). And that's a valid strategy if the student intends to operate exclusively with a paddle.

The problem arises when a student who has learned on a paddle switches to a hand-key.  Since all of his sending has been generated by an automatic keyer, he has no concept of how to make a space . . . and spacing has to be "made."  A space is NOT the absence of sending.  It is an entity unto itself.  It is an "operator made" entity for all three spacing "events":  spacing between elements, spacing between characters, and spacing between words.

I ask my students how many characters are there in the English alphabet and of course they reply 26.  I then say "wrong" and tell them there are 27.  In Morse Code the 27th character is a space, it is THE most important character in the alphabet, and it is the hardest character of all to learn.

That is why I go back and forth in my own mind on the paddle-first versus hand key-first debate.

While a paddle (which requires an electronic keyer to work) will teach a student how to send alphabetic characters and numbers, it will not teach the student how to send the elements that make up alphabetic characters and numbers.  It cannot teach correct dit-length, dah-length, or inter-character spacing.  The reason a paddle cannot teach this is because the electronic keyer is doing it automatically for the student.

When a hand-key is used, the operator must make the three spacing "events" himself.  There is no electronic keyer to make them for him.  Of course this results in atrocious sending at first and for quite a while thereafter.  But by repeated exposure to perfect automatic code and then parroting back manually what he's hearing, the student's sending eventually becomes indistinguishable from that being generated by whatever source represents the perfect automatic code (W1AW, tapes, computer programs, skilled CW ops, etc.).

Whether straight-key first or paddle-key first, it probably comes down to the student's own motivation, coordination, and competence. I've done it both ways.  But I guess in the last few years I've gone back to straight-key first.  When I think they've finally mastered the 27th character, I'll suggest they bring a paddle next week. From then on, it's merely a matter of getting on the air and  making contacts.  But I never let them off the hook when it comes to spacing.

73,

Kent  K9ZTV


On 5/20/2019 9:45 AM, Willi, OE1WKL wrote:
Although this is against "old school" teaching, I suggest you start with a paddle and not a manual key, and you start keying right from the beginning.

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Kent Trimble, K9ZTV
 

Roland . . .

If available, many local radio clubs have on-going CW classes.  I've been teaching ours every Saturday morning for the last 15 years.

Failing in that, there are many on-line CW programs you can download and use on your computer.  If one doesn't appeal to you, try another.  There may also be some cassette practice tapes floating around if you can find a player.

Here in the United States, W1AW transmits daily Morse Code sessions and bulletins.  I do not know what might be available in Europe in that regard.

There are also CW groups that sponsor on-line training programs.

I learned the code at age 12 for a Boy Scout merit badge.  But it wasn't until age 15 (1960) that I got serious enough to get code practice records (vinyl, 78-rpm) sold by Ameco.  Every afternoon, when I got home from school, I'd fire up a phonograph and work on those lessons.  They focused on random letters and numbers, far better than plain text words.  From 5 wpm in August to 13 wpm the following April when I sat before a Federal examiner for the General License (all amateur privileges in those days), Morse Code got its hooks into me and it's been my favorite mode ever since.  Your speed will increase exponentially when you start making on-the-air CW contacts.

Good luck . . .

73,

Kent  K9ZTV


On 5/20/2019 11:08 AM, Roland wrote:
Matthew, to complement morserino I am practicing copy2head with morsedx.com (formerly morsefusion). What I really like about morserino is the keying part besides listening to the sounds of the characters. It motivates me to do better and better each time. Almost like a computer game of some sort. Motivation is the key when learning something new, I hope I can keep it up ;-)

Thanks for all your valuable advice guys ! keep em coming.

73
Roland, HB9VQQ


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