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Re: WSJ editors denounce FBI raid on Mar-a-Lago

sartesian@...
 

I've read the WSJ everyday for 54 years.  Find one editorial disapproving and opposing of any policy, any actions Trump took prior to Jan 6.  Anyone who believes Murdoch and the WSJ hate Trump, probably believes that Ivanka and Jared were moderating influences, Don Jr. tried to get Sr. to call off the rioters, Mike Pence is a hero, and that there is a Sanity Clause.


Re: Walter Russell Mead: Non-Jewish Interest Groups, not "Israel Lobby" Drive Hawkish US Mideast Policy

Jeffrey Masko <j.alan.masko@...>
 

Not sure I agree and perhaps another pitch for Occupation of the American Mind might be helpful. Note the bold type that indicates it is not one or another, but a mutually beneficial arrangement. The film has abridged versions, but treat yourself and watch the complete version.

Occupation of the American Mind

Polling shows strong global opposition to Israel’s illegal 50-year occupation of Palestinian land, and mounting outrage over Israel’s ongoing slaughter of unarmed Palestinian civilians who are fighting for their rights. Nevertheless, public sympathy and support for Israel within the US continues to hold strong. The Occupation of the American Mind zeroes in on this critical exception, breaking down the devastatingly effective public relations war that Israel and right-wing pro-Israel advocacy groups have been waging for decades in the US. Narrated by Roger Waters and featuring leading observers of the Israeli–Palestinian conflict, the film explores how the Israeli government, the US government, and the pro-Israel lobby have joined forces, often with very different motives and interests, to shape American media coverage of the conflict in Israel’s favor. The result is a stunning look at how — and why — American media coverage of the conflict regularly minimizes the occupation, vilifies critics of Israeli policy, and dehumanizes the Palestinian people.


The Occupation of the American Mind is a production of The Media Education Foundation (MEF), a Massachusetts-based organization that produces and distributes educational films about the social, cultural, and political impact of American mass media.


“Bogus Charge”: FBI Raids African People’s Socialist Party; Group Dismisses Russian Influence Claims

Charles Keener
 

Omali Yeshitela is very articulate and very clear. I found this to be an informative segment which raises essential issues.

Charles

Leaders of the African People’s Socialist Party say the FBI carried out a violent raid on its properties with flash grenades and drones early Friday morning in Missouri and Florida. The pan-Africanist group has been a longtime advocate for reparations for slavery and a vocal critic of U.S. foreign policy. The raid appears to be connected to a separate indictment of a Russian man accused of using U.S.-based groups to spread Russian propaganda and tampering with U.S. elections. We speak with Omali Yeshitela, chair of the African People’s Socialist Party, who describes how he was zip-tied while his home was raided. He says the FBI’s implication that their group was taking orders from the Russians is “the most ridiculous, asinine” narrative. “It’s an attack on the right of Black people,” says Yeshitela. “It’s an attack on our struggle for the absolute total liberation of every square inch of Africa.”

“Bogus Charge”: FBI Raids African People’s Socialist Party; Group Dismisses Russian Influence Claims | Democracy Now!


Re: Another Round Of Mormons On The Mind!: Four Streaming Tv Reviews - CounterPunch.org

Michael Yates
 

Thanks for this, Andy. I watched two of these four series. I couldn't watch more than a couple episodes of the first one you examine. I found the Krakauer one decent, not as good as his book but OK. The Stay Sweet one held my interest. It might appear as some kind of pornography, but real human beings suffered greatly at Jeff's hands. One thing I wondered about. What do you think of the book Mormon Country by Wallace Stegner? And do you know about the Mormon settling of Orderville, a community built upon a kind of religiously-inspired communism? We've spent a good deal of time in Mormon country, mainly in Moab. Spectacular beauty there. Met some good and some very odd people. We had a good friend who was raised in rural Utah. Just hated the Mormons and everything about them. He was a good friend of Wallace Stegner's son. One thing for sure, Mormons wield more political power than the average American can imagine. 


Re: WSJ editors denounce FBI raid on Mar-a-Lago

Walter Lippmann
 

Sartesian writes:
Murdoch hate Trump.  Nonsense.  The WSJ no more hates Trump than the Koch Bros hate the Proud Boys.
==============================
Lippmann concludes:
Don't know about Koch and the Proud Boys, but I DO know:
Only non-reading of the WSJ could result in such a statement.

VANITY FAIR provides some documentation:
EVEN RUPERT MURDOCH APPEARS TO BE OVER TRUMP AS A YOUNGER GENERATION EYES 2024
Voters across the political spectrum are fed up with current candidates.
BY KELLY RISSMAN

JULY 24, 2022

The editorial board for the New York Post called former President Donald Trump “unworthy” to be the country’s president again on Friday while The Wall Street Journal condemned Trump's inaction during the Capitol attack, further emphasizing America’s unhappiness with the 2020 political candidates.

Both papers are owned by Rupert Murdoch, and the conservative editorial boards’ criticism of the former president is striking given the Post’s endorsement of Trump’s last presidential run and the Journal largely supporting him while in office.

The Post editorial seized on the evidence presented in the latest January 6 hearing in which Trump did nothing to stop the mob at the Capitol. “There has been much debate over whether Trump’s rally speech on Jan. 6, 2021, constituted ‘incitement.’ That’s somewhat of a red herring. What matters more — and has become crystal clear in recent days—is that Trump didn’t lift a finger to stop the violence that followed,” The Post editorial board said.
https://www.vanityfair.com/news/2022/07/even-rupert-murdoch-wants-trump-out-of-gop



Walter Russell Mead: Non-Jewish Interest Groups, not "Israel Lobby" Drive Hawkish US Mideast Policy

Dennis Brasky
 

Rejecting the idea of a Jewish-led "Israel Lobby" Mead emphasizes the historical influence of American Christian Zionists and militarists in tilting America's Mideast policy toward the goals of the Israeli right… Israel’s most influential supporters in the U.S., Mead proposes, have acted often not out of sympathy with the state of Israel on its own terms, but rather out of the American national interest and in ways that accord with their own notions of Jews and Biblical prophecy.

In other words - the dog wags its tail and not the other way around!

 

https://newrepublic.com/article/167343/focus-israel-lobby-gets-us-foreign-policy-wrong-walter-russell-mead-review



Re: WSJ editors denounce FBI raid on Mar-a-Lago

sartesian@...
 

Murdoch hate Trump.  Nonsense.  The WSJ no more hates Trump than the Koch Bros hate the Proud Boys.


Re: WSJ editors denounce FBI raid on Mar-a-Lago

Walter Lippmann
 

The Wall Street Journal hates Trump because he's bad for business. He's rude, crude and harms their interests by his boorish methods.

The Wall Street Journal's hypocrisy is obvious since they have not even mentioned the federal government's assault on the African People's Socialist Party and the Uhuru Movement. Their leader, Chairman Omali Yeshitela and his wife were treated with handcuffs, flash grenades, battering rams.

They waited until Trump was out of town to enter Mar-Lago.it was instand world news while the attacks on APSP and the Uhuru Movement have been all but buried except for friend like kept and Black media. 


Another Round Of Mormons On The Mind!: Four Streaming Tv Reviews - CounterPunch.org

Andrew Stewart
 


Re: AL JAZEERA: The Gaza Strip explained in maps

Bobby MacVeety
 

Thanks you for a very cogent detailed understanding of the position I have been seeking.


On Aug 9, 2022, at 10:49 PM, Marv Gandall <marvgand2@...> wrote:



Judging from the comments on this thread by David W. and others, one would think that support on the Marxist left for a national struggle has always been unconditional. Not so. 

FWIW, and as I noted in this same discussion a couple of months ago, the Bolsheviks supported national struggles on condition that a) they were aimed against  imperialism, and b) the logic of these anti-imperialist struggles, so it was believed,  would align them with the growing international movement for socialist revolution. 

The Ukrainian resistance to Putin’s invasion is not consistent with this tradition but runs counter to it. Rather than fighting against imperialism, the Ukraine government and national movement on which it rests fully support and is dependent on US imperialism, NATO and the European capitalist economic bloc. Even assuming for argument’s sake that Russia is imperialist, there is nothing in the Marxist tradition which justifies support for one imperialism (NATO, of which Ukraine is a de facto member) against another.

Dogmatic nods to winning the Ukrainian masses to socialism is hopelessly wishful thinking. For one thing, he Bolshevik position on self-determination was formulated in the context of an international socialist movement exerting a powerful attraction on peoples struggling for national liberation everywhere. That movement no longer exists, neither for the Ukrainians nor for any other nationalist movement. More decisively in the case of Ukraine, the idea of socialism is identified with the USSR and is anathema to the mass of the population, and helps explain why popular discontent has been channeled in a rightward rather than left wing direction. 

By contrast, while the leaderships of Hamas and the PLO are not deserving of political support, the movement which they represent, though not what it once was, is still engaged in struggle against Israel, Western imperialism's staunchest ally in the Middle East. For this reason, the Palestinian masses have not historically had a favourable opinion of Western imperialism.

The Ukrainian national movement, which does have a favourable opinion of Western imperialism, by extension enthusiastically enthusiastically supports Israel against Palestinian “terrorism”, a view again expressed this week by the Ukrainian Ambassador to Israel (https://www.palestinechronicle.com/ukraine-declares-support-for-israel-condemns-palestinian-terrorism/). 
 
I’d be surprised if the tiny Ukrainian left has denounced this view, even more surprised if it would find any echo within the Ukrainian population which has shown no sign of pursuing an independent course from the Zelenskii government.


WSJ editors denounce FBI raid on Mar-a-Lago

John Reimann
 

'Those militant uncompromising fighters for their class – the capitalist class – are not happy. Yes, I’m talking about the editorial board of the Wall St. Journal. They have several complaints, criticisms and threats regarding the search of Mar-a-Lago. They complain that the issue of Trump’s illegal seizure of government documents should have been settled by negotiations, which was what was happening — for nearly 2 years. What’s to negotiate, especially considering that he’d apparently tried to flush other documents down the toilet when he was in office?'

John Reimann

--
“Science and socialism go hand-in-hand.” Felicity Dowling
Check out:https:http://oaklandsocialist.com also on Facebook


Re: AL JAZEERA: The Gaza Strip explained in maps

Marv Gandall
 

Judging from the comments on this thread by David W. and others, one would think that support on the Marxist left for a national struggle has always been unconditional. Not so. 

FWIW, and as I noted in this same discussion a couple of months ago, the Bolsheviks supported national struggles on condition that a) they were aimed against  imperialism, and b) the logic of these anti-imperialist struggles, so it was believed,  would align them with the growing international movement for socialist revolution. 

The Ukrainian resistance to Putin’s invasion is not consistent with this tradition but runs counter to it. Rather than fighting against imperialism, the Ukraine government and national movement on which it rests fully support and is dependent on US imperialism, NATO and the European capitalist economic bloc. Even assuming for argument’s sake that Russia is imperialist, there is nothing in the Marxist tradition which justifies support for one imperialism (NATO, of which Ukraine is a de facto member) against another.

Dogmatic nods to winning the Ukrainian masses to socialism is hopelessly wishful thinking. For one thing, he Bolshevik position on self-determination was formulated in the context of an international socialist movement exerting a powerful attraction on peoples struggling for national liberation everywhere. That movement no longer exists, neither for the Ukrainians nor for any other nationalist movement. More decisively in the case of Ukraine, the idea of socialism is identified with the USSR and is anathema to the mass of the population, and helps explain why popular discontent has been channeled in a rightward rather than left wing direction. 

By contrast, while the leaderships of Hamas and the PLO are not deserving of political support, the movement which they represent, though not what it once was, is still engaged in struggle against Israel, Western imperialism's staunchest ally in the Middle East. For this reason, the Palestinian masses have not historically had a favourable opinion of Western imperialism.

The Ukrainian national movement, which does have a favourable opinion of Western imperialism, by extension enthusiastically enthusiastically supports Israel against Palestinian “terrorism”, a view again expressed this week by the Ukrainian Ambassador to Israel (https://www.palestinechronicle.com/ukraine-declares-support-for-israel-condemns-palestinian-terrorism/). 
 
I’d be surprised if the tiny Ukrainian left has denounced this view, even more surprised if it would find any echo within the Ukrainian population which has shown no sign of pursuing an independent course from the Zelenskii government.


Haymarket Socialism Conference Agenda

Anthony Boynton
 

For all of you who may be going to the Socialism conference, sponsored by Haymarket, in Chicago from Sept 2 to 5, here is the complete schedule to date. 

I highly recommend Yulia Yurchenko's presentation on Ukrainian self-determination on Sunday the 4th at 3:00 PM. 


Anthony


Essay about work

Michael Yates
 

This is the opening paragraph of an essay posted today on Counterpunch: 

"Bud is examining airplane windshields destined for the F111 fighter jet. It is the late 1960s, and he has been working for nearly thirty years at the Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company in a small town forty miles north of the city. The glass will sit in the plane’s cockpit at a very shallow angle, so any flaws in the glass will be magnified. It is high-pressure work. The company wants to ship flawless glass, but if he rejects too many pieces, the foreman will be unhappy. As will workers down the line, who get incentive pay for the number of plates that go through their stations. Bud works under high-intensity lamps, giving him constant eyestrain and headaches. He copes by gulping aspirins and smoking cigarettes. Several of the latter are burning simultaneously on his table. He’s drained when he gets home, where there will be other demands to satisfy. Later that evening, he will coach kids in a local sports league. Unless, of course, he is working shifts and has the miserable 4 PM to midnight stint, which wrecks much of the day before the whistle calls him back to the endless plates of glass. Many years later, when he is retired, after 44 years of hard labor, he is dying of emphysema, the product of all those cigarettes, plus the asbestos and silica dust in the factory. He ruefully remembers a boss telling him that if you could see the dust, it wouldn’t harm you. He tells his son, who remembers still what he said, “Mike, I didn’t think it would be like this.” As we will see, Bud's plight is no less applicable to the world's workers today than it was then. Perhaps more so. He was in a union, with rights few now have." 

The essay is at https://www.counterpunch.org/2022/08/09/work-work-work-so-a-few-can-be-rich/

It would be nice to imagine that workers in Russia, Ukraine, China, Mexico, the US, the UK, India, everywhere would say enough is enough with respect to the misery that is our daily toil. That somehow this would transcend the multiple differences within the working class, that it would overcome the insane nationalism that helps to sustain wars, that we would begin to see the connections between the work we do and the environmental catastrophes engulfing us. Sadly, such is not the case. We have many good examples of radical change. But none have blossomed outward to encompass the world.

Work in modern society is a torment, an affliction arising from the nature of the economic system, which could not be more antithetical to the way we labored for more than 95 percent of the 200 ...
www.counterpunch.org





Re: AL JAZEERA: The Gaza Strip explained in maps

Jeffrey Masko <j.alan.masko@...>
 

David, this is not the period of the great wars and the equivalency of this conflict with them is false as equating Russia with Nazi Germany or the Kuomintang, so while history may rhyme, is certainly does not repeat itself. The comparisons are too far off to give us any real insight to today's struggle. This is not a world at war, or one devastated by one. Another point is that Ukraine, one the poorest nations in Europe, has an even more fragmented left than the U.S., so to hope for a revolutionary worker movement to appear strong enough to influence the conflict is, to me, wishful thinking. the Ukraine is not ready for anything remotely like you've described.

"Invitation to the table" is meant metaphorically, in that institutions strong enough to have influence, will be asked to participate with developing policy, for instance, unions often are asked in war time to limit strike activity, the result of formal or informal participation within the power structure. This is far from the case in Ukraine.

More importantly is the false opposition of Russia or Ukraine. You can support the Ukrainian people and say, they are taking terrible losses and will not win, time to stop taking more damage. It is only moral outrage, not military insights that is motivating folks to support a territorial defense. At some point, you might have to throw in the towel for your fighter and look to the future. To not do so is to ask Ukraine to sustain more damage, yes, some folks there may want to fight to the last soldier, but that may not be the best option.

Finally, radical leftists here in the states (and most other places), can do very little concretely in terms of boots on the ground (prolly nothing), so analysis, developing programs, and disseminating them becomes more of an intellectual exercise with little contact with the real world. Our work, imo, begins in our neighborhood and extends out, not the other way around. That doesn't mean ignoring world events, but putting what we can do about them and where our influence is more keen into perspective.

I think Marv and others on the list have made the points I think are important and others here see folks like that as the Alex Jones of the left. So be it, it will continue as long as folks continue to ignore how media, small and large, are shaping the attitudes of this conflict much more than their historical understanding.



Re: AL JAZEERA: The Gaza Strip explained in maps

sartesian@...
 

I'm using the quotes to indicate a general classification of a widespread belief.  In this case -- dare not criticize reflects back to DW's  We didn't "tell" the actual movement of thousands and millions "what to do",  which is another examples of using quotation marks without quoting a specific individual.

As for DW's remarks, I don't know how he reconciles the advocacy of "building an alternative working class leadership." (direct quote) with his other statements that he "doesn't give a shit" about what type of government is leading or evolving from the struggle in Ukraine.


Re: Zero growth, degrowth and income distribution

Mark Baugher
 

On Aug 3, 2022, at 6:28 PM, David Walters <dwaltersmia@...> wrote:

I'll have to read the link this week. Agriculture is, by definition, one community displacing another species. The act of "planting" a seed, and lots of seeds of the same kind, is "disrupting" the local "natural" ecology. I have written on regenerative agriculture*, and I'm a big supporter of it (the real regenerative agriculture that doesn't see cattle as enemies). However, I presuppose that the Catton talks about a qualitative decline in other species on a given part of the land vs the overall good such human intrusion makes as we develop as a species.

David
* https://oaklandsocialist.com/2018/10/10/developing-a-marxist-approach-to-global-agriculture-a-primer-on-the-role-of-animals-in-maintaining-soil-health/
To me, a complete novice in this area, species displacement or "takeover" means appropriation of new resources rather than re-using traditional farmland. The expansion of factory farming and feedlots, however, create dead zones in rivers and oceans, displacing the other species and humans who feed themselves off those resources.

In "Developing a Marxist approach to global agriculture," you might consider starting with city/country alienation in its historical context, which leads to a crisis in European agriculture in the 18th and 19th centuries, also in the US colonies. According to Ch 5 of _Marx's_Ecology_, Marx and others were aware of an alarming decline in per-acre yield of farm produce in Europe. This led to the work of Liebig and the beginnings of soil science who realized that farms lose their nutrients as farmers ship its produce to the city where it becomes garbage and human waste, flushed into rivers and eventually oceans, or buried in large holes near the city. Newly emerging soil science triggered a commercial scramble for fertilizers (nitrogen, phosphate, and potassium as recounted in the _Marx'_Ecology_). Much of the market exploited colonial producers in the 19th century, such as the bird guano. European colonialism exported city/country alienation across the world in the 18th and 19th centuries.

You might want to compare Adaptive multi-paddock grazing to the "green revolution" and other technologies that promised to produce something from nothing. As Barry Commoner wrote, everything must come from somewhere and go somewhere. For the sake of argument, how do we know that AMP is not another proposal with to-be-discovered downsides? I'm not saying it is but you might want to preemptively answer the question. Also, if AMP is the same as mob-grazing, I'd choose one to use in the article and note that the other name is equivalent.

Mark


Re: Mike Davis on Death, Organizing, Politics, Climate Change

Mark Baugher
 

I read Davis' _City_of_Quartz_ a couple of years ago and enjoyed it despite having to slog through all of the cultural criticism. But I never figured out, or found anything in the book, to explain why he called LA the "city of quartz."

Mark


Re: Mike Davis on Death, Organizing, Politics, Climate Change

Mark Baugher
 

On Aug 9, 2022, at 4:17 AM, Dayne Goodwin <daynegoodwin@...> wrote:

One authentic 'insider' source on the building of
the anti-Vietnam war movement is Fred Halstead's "Out Now: A
Participant's Account of the Movement in the United States Against the
Vietnam War" (originally published in 1978; Halstead died age 61 in
1988).
And he may have been spared the worst of the SWP decline.

Mark


Re: Mike Davis on Death, Organizing, Politics, Climate Change

Dayne Goodwin
 

On Thu, Aug 4, 2022 at 6:38 AM Mark Baugher <mark@...> wrote:
. . .
"the SWP ... an organization that had been so effective in organizing against the US Vietnam War (IMHO)"...
Yes Mark B., agreed, the SWP had been effective in organizing against
the US war in Vietnam. The small SWP steadily built the mass action
united front antiwar movement - "Bring All the Troops Home Now!" -
initially against the opposition of Democrats/liberals generally until
Nixon took office in January 1969. We continued building mass antiwar
actions in the streets (peaking April 24, 1971) now with opposition
from the growing ultraleft trend (which became mainly Maoist).

Unfortunately THAT chain has also been broken and the history of the
SWP's successful revolutionary socialist strategy and tactics in
building the anti-Vietnam war movement is largely unknown today. I
think that is partly because the SWP politically self-destructed going
into the 1980s so that there was no 'audible' challenge to the
developing msm liberal and popular ultraleft versions of that antiwar
movement history. One authentic 'insider' source on the building of
the anti-Vietnam war movement is Fred Halstead's "Out Now: A
Participant's Account of the Movement in the United States Against the
Vietnam War" (originally published in 1978; Halstead died age 61 in
1988).







On Thu, Aug 4, 2022 at 6:38 AM Mark Baugher <mark@...> wrote:

On Aug 3, 2022, at 12:09 PM, Bobby MacVeety <bobbymacveety@...> wrote:
Why no left leadership?
I'm thinking of organized transference of knowledge and experience from one generation to another. Farrell Dobbs still led the SWP the year I joined; that was about to change, but it impressed me greatly that an organization that had been so effective in organizing against the US Vietnam War (IMHO), led labor uprisings and the breakthrough of industrial unions in the 1930s (about a half century behind Europe, a historical reality that John Reimann considered at a forum on Sunday). I learned that the chain went back to the SP and IWW through Cannon and others in the party. That chain has been broken today.

Ready to go to jail is one thing;
What does going to jail have to do with it? Today, we have protest rituals where protesters insist on committing some infraction, get arrested, bailed out, and go home for dinner, or breakfast. I understood non-violent civil disobedience to be breaking laws that a significant part of the population see as unjust. Today, civil disobedience includes actions like leading a march onto a freeway. This is not so persuasive, and the point is to persuade people, win them over, and grow the movement. The goal should be to maximize participation and not lead people unnecessarily into dangerous situations.

In the US, moreover, there's a big difference between white people going to jail for protest and Black people going to jail. I went to jail in D.C. three times during May Day, 1971. The first night was the Colosseum, which was kind of a political Woodstock for the night. I followed Hosea Williams around like a puppy as he gave speeches and talks. He finally cut me and a number of other white radicals loose late in the evening (it was an overwhelmingly white, young and male affair) and left with his crew form the Poor Peoples' Campaign. After new were fed sandwiches and bailed out the next day, I spotted was Hosea Williams outside the building talking to a group of older Black people, maybe a dozen of them. Looking around, he spotted me. I was highly flattered when he called me over, put his arm around my shoulder, and called me "brother," but then he quickly departed, leaving me to talk to the crowd, who I discovered where there to protest people like me: They were tired of a bunch of white kids trashing their home town; they knew it would have been a blood bath if we were a bunch of Black kids. That experience had a big effect on me, leading me to abandon my ultra left ways.

ready to be assassinated is something else.
MLK. Malcolm. John Lennon. Fred Hampton.
It’s a very long list.
In the most violent militaristic hyper armed society the world has ever seen, who’s going to stand up and lead the left?
Besides, aren’t we through with vertical organizations patterned after the military and corporations? Doesn’t real democracy mean equality?
I think it does. Democratic centralism was supposed to provide that.
Mark

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