Date   

Russia and the Theory of “Lesser-Evil” Imperialism

RKOB
 

Russia and the Theory of “Lesser-Evil” Imperialism

On some Stalinists and “Trotskyists” who formally recognize Russia’s class character but reject the political consequences

By Michael Pröbsting, RCIT, 28 July 2022

https://www.thecommunists.net/worldwide/global/russia-and-the-theory-of-lesser-evil-imperialism/

 

Contents

 

Introduction

The originator: the Stalinist RKRP (Russia)

The tradition of Lenin … and Stalin

The RKRP’s version of “Philosophia ancilla theologiae

The Stalinist KKE (Greece) and its allies: a discreetly hidden version of the “lesser-evil” theory

Alan Woods’ IMT: A de facto version of the theory of “lesser-evil” imperialism

Conclusions


Re: H-Net Review [H-Empire]: Ivey on Daly, 'The Rise of Western Power: a Comparative History of Western Civilization (2nd ed.)'

Charlie
 

How to explain "the rise of the West"? It seems that neither the author of the book nor the reviewer come within a mile of formulating the problem as, why did capitalism triumph first in England and western Europe rather than in China, India, Persia and the rest of Asia Minor, the Mesopotamian areas, along the Mediterranean coast of Africa, nor in the western hemisphere?

The key turns out to be the dynamic of forces and relations of production, as Marx said in a few sentences (just as Newton founded mechanics in a few equations). You can't go there, because then you'd also have to ask about the same dynamic taking capitalism to its end (the subject of The Hollow Colossus by yours truly.


Re: A review of an exhibition in Berlin currently

Mark Lause
 

I'd love to get over to see that exhibit.  Even without it, though, that museum is simply splendid.

Doesn't hurt to be in a city with parks and streets named for the great socialists of our past.


Re: A review of an exhibition in Berlin currently

Chris Slee
 

Here is a review of a book by Enzo Traverso, "The Marxists and the Jewish Question: History of a Debate".





A review of an exhibition in Berlin currently

hari kumar
 

The title of the article below, will alert this audience at MM, as to an underlying drift of an exhibition of the Deutsches Historisches Museum.  
"Marx, Wagner, and Anti-Semitism: A Review of the Exhibition ‘Karl Marx und der Kapitalismus;                                          sub-title: 
A new exhibition of the life and work of Marx raises many interesting questions, not least his attitude to anti-semitism; Deutsches Historisches Museum. https://www.theleftberlin.com/marx-wagner-and-anti-semitism-a-review-of-the-exhibition-karl-marx-und-der-kapitalismus/

Hari


Re: Expect a 2nd Trump presidency to "clean house"

Avram Rips
 

Do you know that money is now being transferred into a shady outfit to achieve these goals?  https://www.downwithtyranny.com/post/building-an-organization-for-a-fascist-takeover-right-under-the-nose-of-biden-s-pathetic-doj


On Wednesday, July 27, 2022, John Reimann <1999wildcat@...> wrote:
Trump's attempt at a violent coup on January 6 never really had a realistic possibility of succeeding. Here is how he is preparing a team for a legal coup should he get back in office in 2024. (Note: the old guard Republicans favor just such a coup; they just think they'd have a better chance with somebody else to carry it out.)
https://oaklandsocialist.com/2022/07/27/trump-learned-his-lesson-building-a-team-for-second-term/

--
“Science and socialism go hand-in-hand.” Felicity Dowling
Check out:https:http://oaklandsocialist.com also on Facebook


Re: The correct way to denazify

Vladimiro Giacche'
 

Facts speak louder than words: 
since March every time the Parliament voted on the issue they voted in favor. 

For instance: 

The opposition in the government came lately by M5S, not by Lega 

Inviato da iPhone

Il giorno 27 lug 2022, alle ore 09:46, Michael Karadjis <mkaradjis@...> ha scritto:



(ANSA) - ROME, MAY 26 - League leader Matteo Salvini reiterated his opposition to Italy sending more weapons to Ukraine during an an ANSA Forum on Thursday.
    "


Re: The correct way to denazify

Jeffrey Masko <j.alan.masko@...>
 


He got caught cheating on his wife with the wife of the co-founder of the Trad Worker's Party and zip, it all went down the drain. He is persona non grata in white nationalist circles. It is not uncommon for young folks mixed in radical politics (left and right) to "jump" sides, in my experience. Both sides are often driven by identity fusion, rather than real ideological beliefs. It's just as common on the left with folks arguing they are Marxists, not communists, or communitarians, not anarchists, and so on. It's a bit more evident on the right as folks tend to get involved earlier and after they mature, they often understand the idiocy of what they thought was true. This is the basis of counter-recruitment.

The "recent white nationalist event in Florida organised by the America First Political Action Conference" is  a good example of the incoherence of the "movement," as MTG and others say that "Last weekend, Mitch McConnell, the Senate’s top Republican, dismissed Greene and Cawthorn as “a few lonely voices off to the side”, telling CBS News: “The vast majority of the Republican party writ large, both in the Congress and across the country, are totally behind the Ukrainians.”

If Trump made an about face on Russia, so would MTG, Nick Fuentes, and the others. They are only posturing to ride DT's coattails. I'm not saying this isn't dangerous, but by no means are white nationalists in the U.S. monolithic and when they try to organize on a wide scale, they are not successful. Yet. 

On Wed, Jul 27, 2022 at 12:46 AM Michael Karadjis <mkaradjis@...> wrote:

(ANSA) - ROME, MAY 26 - League leader Matteo Salvini reiterated his opposition to Italy sending more weapons to Ukraine during an an ANSA Forum on Thursday.
    "The most powerful weapon will be diplomacy, not missiles or warheads," Salvini said when asked about the policy of giving military aid to Kyiv following the Russian invasion.
    "We are sending aid to save lives and defending the national interest involves doing everything to avoid sending more weapons.
    "I'm counting on no more talk of sending weapons but of sending diplomats.
    "I hope there is no (new) vote on sending weapons.
    "If there is, the League will reiterate that the most powerful weapon is diplomacy.”

https://www.ansa.it/english/news/politics/2022/05/26/ukraine-do-everything-not-to-send-more-arms-salvini_4064c49c-0c12-43df-a794-1cdedd0c7cbf.html

Italian right-wing firebrand Matteo Salvini is on the defensive over aborted plans to visit Moscow in late May as part of a trip paid for by the Russian government.

The Russian embassy in Italy said on social media over the weekend that it had purchased Aeroflot tickets for a trip from Istanbul to Moscow for Salvini and his entourage as sanctions against the Russian government over its war on Ukraine made it difficult to make travel bookings from within the EU.

Salvini, once an outspoken admirer of Russian President Vladimir Putin, claims that he planned to visit Moscow as part of efforts to stop the war. The trip never took place due to widespread criticism from within the Italian government, of which his League party is a part.

https://www.politico.eu/article/matteo-salvini-russia-vladimir-putin-trip-moscow-ukraine-war/

Share of adults who feel sympathy towards Ukraine in the European Union in 2022, by country  

Italy: Totally agree 54%, tend to agree 34% = 88%; tend to disagree 6%, totally disagree 4% = 10%

https://www.statista.com/statistics/1307765/eu-sympathy-ukraine/

Yes, Meloni has caught the vibe and therefore opportunistically replaced her old pro-Putinism (https://www.facebook.com/giorgiameloni.paginaufficiale/posts/complimenti-a-vladimir-putin-per-la-sua-quarta-elezione-a-presidente-della-feder/10156154246102645/) with strong support for Ukraine; she could do this because her association with Putin had not been as absolute, over the top as that of Salvini and Berlusconi (who met Putin in a Crimean vineyard in 2014 to toast his annexation of Crimea). So she could do it with a straighter face. She’s riding top of the polls. Salvini and Lega’s support has relatively crashed since start of year – yes, he was forced to shamefacedly say Putin was wrong to invade (especially after being physically attacked in Poland over his love for Putin), but after years and years of Putinism people can hardly take it seriously.

Obviously, Putin’s war is not just a crime “but a mistake” as we keep hearing. The entire world of fascists, Nazis, white-supremacists and fare-rightists loved him as the God of the White Race, especially as his crimes against humanity tended to be directed against bad Arabs and Muslims such as Syrians and Chechens. The entire global far right was with Putin on Syria (even those who didn’t like Putin much loved Assad). But then he went and attacked another “white” country, and the refugees in Europe this time are white. Naturally, there will be fall-out. A common reaction is revulsion against “brother wars” and the view that “globalists” and “Jews” in both Russia and Ukraine and the West caused this war between “white” nations: https://warontherocks.com/2022/03/how-are-putins-far-right-fans-in-the-west-reacting-to-his-war/

Naturally, that would happen among US fascists as well.

Jeffrey Masko: “Your links are old concerning the U.S. pro-putin bloc.”

Perhaps, but this is not old: at a recent white nationalist event in Florida organised by the America First Political Action Conference (AFPAC), racist Nick Fuentes prompted the crowd, “Can we get a round of applause for Russia?” The crowd responded by shouting: “Putin! Putin!”

“See Heimbach, founder of the pro-Confederate Traditional Workers Party, spectacular implosion”

Not sure what happened to Heimbach – I heard he dropped Naziism and race wars in favour of “Marxism-Leninism”: and workers unity??


On Wed, Jul 27, 2022 at 2:49 AM Vladimiro Giacche' <vladimiro.giacche@...> wrote:
Once again, I can answer only regarding Italy : 

In Italy a majority of Italian population from the very start of this war opposes sending arms to Ukraine (around 63% in the last opinion polls; the polls since February NEVER gave an opposite result) , while around 39% (following a recent opinion poll) even thinks Putin is right. 
So Lega etc. probably LOST votes. 

We haven’t a social breakdown of these data, but I personally doubt that the working class in Italy has the “sense of solidarity etc.” mentioned in the passage below. I personally observed more “solidarity” in the upper class (this is only anecdotal evidence though). 


Inviato da iPhone

Il giorno 26 lug 2022, alle ore 17:43, Michael Karadjis <mkaradjis@...> ha scritto:


No, on the contrary, they must adapt, for votes, because the European working classes have a natural sense of solidarity with their fellow Ukrainian workers being butchered  by some fascist-led imperial superpower. That is only normal.


Re: Max Boot: "We seem to be sleepwalking towards disaster"

Walter Lippmann
 

Yes, there IS a civil war going on in the United States today. There's a split among the rich and powerful with forces like Murdoch's Wall Street Journal and New York Post campaigning against Donald J. Trump, while some on the political left have embraced Trumpism.

For example:

Two recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions protecting the constitutional right to freedom of worship are good for working people. At the same time, these rulings are attacked by liberals as reactionary and as a further reason why Democrats must win November’s elections in order to find a way to take down the court’s constitutionalist majority. 
https://themilitant.com/2022/07/16/constitutional-right-to-freedom-of-worship-is-upheld-by-court/


Re: Max Boot: "We seem to be sleepwalking towards disaster"

Walter Lippmann
 

Yes. There IS a civil war going on, a split among the ruling layers of the United States. Even the Wall Street Journal is campaigning against Trump and his band of proto-faschistic gangsters. And, an astounding thing, some on the political left have endorsed this Trumpista phenomenon.

For example:


THE MILITANT
Two recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions protecting the constitutional right to freedom of worship are good for working people. At the same time, these rulings are attacked by liberals as reactionary and as a further reason why Democrats must win November’s elections in order to find a way to take down the court’s constitutionalist majority.
 

https://themilitant.com/2022/07/16/constitutional-right-to-freedom-of-worship-is-upheld-by-court/

 

 


Max Boot: "We seem to be sleepwalking towards disaster"

John Reimann
 

"I used to be an optimist about America’s future. Not anymore....The prognosis is grim.... We seem to be sleepwalking to disaster."... Former Republican strategist Max Boot.

Unfortunately, the majority of the socialist left is included among these "sleepwalkers"

Full article:
Near the end of last week’s Jan. 6 House committee hearing, former deputy national security adviser Matthew Pottinger, a perpetually cheerful former Marine, said the attack on the Capitol “emboldened our enemies by helping give them ammunition to feed a narrative that our system of government doesn’t work, that the United States is in decline. China, the Putin regime in Russia, Tehran, they’re fond of pushing those kinds of narratives — and by the way, they’re wrong.”

Sign up for a weekly roundup of thought-provoking ideas and debates
But are they wrong? They certainly have been to date; the United States has been defying predictions of doom for more than two centuries. But, as the ads for mutual funds say, past performance is no guarantee of future results. We need to take seriously the possibility that the United States could become a failed democracy, if only to avert that dire fate. There’s a good reason that 85 percent of respondents in a recent survey said the country is headed in the wrong direction.

A lot of the gloom and doom is due, of course, to the high rate of inflation, which will subside in time. But there are more intractable problems, too, such as the persistence of racism and income inequality. That we have far more gun violence than other advanced democracies and yet can’t implement common-sense gun-safety regulations (such as a ban on military-style assault rifles and high-capacity magazines) is a damning indictment of our democracy. So, too, is our failure to do more to address climate change even as temperatures spike. When we do act, it often makes the situation worse, not better.

Unleashed by a right-wing Supreme Court, Republican legislatures around the country are repealing or restricting abortion rights. This is producing horror stories that I never thought I would see in the United States. A woman in Texas had to carry a dead fetus for two weeks because removing it would have required a procedure that is also used in abortions. A woman in Wisconsin bled for more than 10 days after an incomplete miscarriage because medical staff would not remove fetal tissue. A 10-year-old girl was raped in Ohio and had to travel to Indiana to get an abortion.

These are the kinds of human rights violations we would be protesting if they occurred in other countries. That they are happening in the United States is an ominous sign of what lies ahead, because other countries in recent years that have taken away abortion rights — Poland and Nicaragua — have also taken away political rights.

We already live in a “backsliding” democracy, where voting rights are being restricted and freedom is under siege. The most severe threat comes from an increasingly authoritarian Republican Party whose maximum leader is an unindicted and unrepentant coup plotter.

Despite the yeoman work of the Jan. 6 committee, former president Donald Trump remains the leading contender for the 2024 GOP nomination — and on the current trajectory he could defeat President Biden, whose unpopularity continues to plumb new depths. We need to be clear about what another Trump term would mean: It could be the death knell for our democracy.

Jonathan Swan of Axios has an alarming report on the preparations in Trump World for returning to power: “Sources close to the former president said that he will — as a matter of top priority – go after the national security apparatus, ‘clean house’ in the intelligence community and the State Department, target the ‘woke generals’ at the Defense Department, and remove the top layers of the Justice Department and FBI.”

One of the instruments of Trumpian purges would be Schedule F, a new category of federal employment that Trump created in 2020 (and Biden rescinded), which would have removed tens of thousands of federal employees from civil service protections. By reviving Schedule F, Trump could fire career officials and replace them with ultra-MAGA loyalists. “F” might as well stand for “fascism,” because that is what we will get if Trump were to appoint his most fanatical acolytes to the most powerful positions in government.

I wish I could say that such a scenario is implausible, but it is all too realistic. I used to be an optimist about America’s future. Not anymore. There’s a good reason that so many people I know are acquiring foreign passports and talking about moving somewhere else: The prognosis is grim.

As political scientist Brian Klaas just wrote in the Atlantic, given that the GOP has become “authoritarian to its core,” there are two main ways to save America: Either reform the Republican Party or ensure that it never wields power again. But a MAGA-fied GOP is likely to gain control of at least one chamber of Congress in the fall and could win complete power in 2024.

We seem to be sleepwalking to disaster. If we don’t wake up in time, we could lose our democracy. Just because we’ve avoided a breakdown in the past doesn’t mean we will stave it off in the future.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2022/07/25/trump-second-term-threat-us-democracy/



--
“Science and socialism go hand-in-hand.” Felicity Dowling
Check out:https:http://oaklandsocialist.com also on Facebook


Expect a 2nd Trump presidency to "clean house"

John Reimann
 

Trump's attempt at a violent coup on January 6 never really had a realistic possibility of succeeding. Here is how he is preparing a team for a legal coup should he get back in office in 2024. (Note: the old guard Republicans favor just such a coup; they just think they'd have a better chance with somebody else to carry it out.)
https://oaklandsocialist.com/2022/07/27/trump-learned-his-lesson-building-a-team-for-second-term/

--
“Science and socialism go hand-in-hand.” Felicity Dowling
Check out:https:http://oaklandsocialist.com also on Facebook


Indiana doctor says she has been harassed for giving an abortion to a 10-year-old

Dennis Brasky
 


Re: An invitation to a forum

Vladimiro Giacche'
 

Then he was interventionist (against the line of the Party), was boosted out of the Party, and after the war he became the leader of a movement financed by capitalists AGAINST socialists and communists . 

Hardly an “example”.

VG 


Inviato da iPhone

Il giorno 26 lug 2022, alle ore 11:57, Dayne Goodwin <daynegoodwin@...> ha scritto:


Benito Mussolini was a central leader of the Italian Socialist Party as WWI began, he had become editor of the ISP's national newspaper Avanti!.

On Sun, Jul 24, 2022 at 12:25 PM Walter Lippmann <walterlx@...> wrote:
> Anthony writes: "ideas associated with Fascism have appeared within the left in the past, and are appearing within the traditional left milieu now."
>> Walter asks: What "ideas"?  Specific "ideas"? Examples?


_._


H-Net Review [H-Empire]: Ivey on Daly, 'The Rise of Western Power: a Comparative History of Western Civilization (2nd ed.)'

Andrew Stewart
 



Best regards,
Andrew Stewart

Begin forwarded message:

From: H-Net Staff via H-REVIEW <h-review@...>
Date: July 27, 2022 at 5:57:01 AM EDT
To: h-review@...
Cc: H-Net Staff <revhelp@...>
Subject: H-Net Review [H-Empire]:  Ivey on Daly, 'The Rise of Western Power: a Comparative History of Western Civilization (2nd ed.)'
Reply-To: h-review@...

Jonathan Daly.  The Rise of Western Power: a Comparative History of
Western Civilization (2nd ed.).  London  Bloomsbury Publishing, 2014,
2021 (2nd ed.).  696 pp.  $44.95 (e-book), ISBN 978-1-4411-1851-6.

Reviewed by Jacob Ivey (Florida Institute of Technology)
Published on H-Empire (July, 2022)
Commissioned by Gemma Masson

Historians have consistently struggled with the fundamental problem
of explaining, both in our writings and teaching, the rise of
European "civilization," which helped to form, for good or ill, the
modern world. In the tradition of J. M. Roberts, Paul Kennedy, and
Norman Davies, Jonathan Daly's _The Rise of Western Power_ is an
attempt to provide a comprehensive analysis of the rise of "the West"
and its perceived achievements that transformed the world. It is an
ambitious goal that produces a readable and thoughtful, though
sometimes problematic, account of this fundamental question within
the broader historiography of world history.

Daly, a historian of Soviet Russia, is no stranger to this topic,
having produced several volumes in the last decade focused on this
very question of the "rise of the West," including the first edition
of this book in 2015, _Historians Debate the Rise of the West_
(2015), and _How Europe Made the Modern World: Creating the Great
Divergence_ (2020). The well-trodden ground of this topic, Daly
argues, has produced the need for this second edition of this volume,
including expanded maps and a helpful list of primary sources through
the Bloomsbury website. Such changes seem to indicate Daly's primary
audience is less the seasoned historian of this topic and more the
undergraduate classroom.

Daly attempts to explain the "rise of the West" as a fundamental
byproduct of the unique set of circumstances that contributed to the
emergence of European powers as the dominant force on the planet.
Unfortunately, in attempting to answer such a critical and broad
question in the history of the world, Daly explanations fall sadly in
line with a somewhat dated and largely Eurocentric theory based on
European exceptionalism and selective information. Daly argues that
the key to Europe's rise centered on the "unusual openness of
Europeans to learning from other cultures" largely explained by
Europe developing as a kind of "tabula rasa on which cultural and
technological borrowings across Eurasia and eventually the wider
world could be inscribed" (pp. xiii, xii).

To accomplish this goal, the author breaks his book into broad
thematic chapters, beginning with the "Innovation in World
Civilization" and moving through "Medieval Transformations" and
"Papal" and "Military" revolutions until arriving in the early modern
era with chapters dedicated to the rise in printing, the Reformation,
and the Scientific Revolution, along with economic revolutions in
commerce, industry, and technology. Finally, he concludes the work
with chapters on the "Crises of the West," including everything from
nineteenth-century imperialism to the Cold War, and "Social
Revolutions," broadly covering the emergence of the middle class and
the struggle for equal rights both in Europe and the United States.

Daly's argument is not particularly groundbreaking, though his broad
approach to each chapter provides a much-needed thematic, instead of
chronological, approach to this topic. There is no want for
information and facts in these six hundred-plus pages. Much of this
work relies on secondary sources, summarizing and building upon some
of the most famous works on this wider topic. The author also
attempts to balance the incredible complexity of economic, social,
and military history, which helps to explain the "rise of the West,"
while also acknowledging the numerous threats to human civilization,
from climate change to COVID-19. Interesting, Daly concludes that
China is one of these major obstacles, not necessarily because of its
economic strength, but because China "has continued to reject Western
values of freedom of speech, inquiry, assembly, and religion," values
Daly claims throughout his book are a unique product of "the West"
(p. 418). This is only one example of the theme of European
exceptionalism that dominates many pages of this book.

Even more problematically, the tragedy of the rise of the West for
the rest of the world is somewhat diminished in this volume. While it
is obviously impossible to provide a complete scope to this
incredibly expansive topic, the author takes more time to discuss the
battles of Crecy and Agincourt than the single paragraph which
outlines a few select examples of the "many vicious acts of violence"
that permeated the age of imperial expansion across the globe in the
nineteenth and early twentieth century (p. 346). Moreover, the
mention of King Leopold on the previous page gives no indication of
some ten million Africans who died in the Congo Free State. Instead,
Daly argues that "ironically and tragically, all of the feverish
imperialist endeavors brought very little of positive value to the
aggressive powers," emphasizing the 21 percent of Britain's exports
going to its colonial possessions as insignificant compared to other
areas of economic interest (p. 347).

This undermining, if not outright dismissal, of the suffering caused
by European powers is a problematic theme of this book. For example,
when attempting to address the thesis of David Stannard's _American
Holocaust_, Daly asks: "was it really genocide?," quoting the
definition from the UN Convention on Genocide. Besides the
problematic nature of this semantic argument, Daly implies that the
decimation of the Native American population was partially the result
of natural factors, going so far as to compare it to the chestnut
tree blight of the early twentieth century in North America. Even
when the author admits that "the point is not to compare the value of
trees to human beings," sadly "the point" has already been made, and
the comparison supremely inappropriate in the context of the enormous
complexity of this issue confronted by genocide scholarship for
decades (p. 131).

Similar problems arise in Daly's approach to slavery within and in
association with Europe. For much of the book, Daly dismisses the
presence of slavery in Europe, either in ancient Greece and Rome or
in early modern Europe, admitting that "Europeans did not reject
slavery in practice, except in Europe itself" when discussing the
triumph of Portugal during their voyages of exploration (p. 129).
This statement ignores not only the large numbers of enslaved
Africans from North Africa seen in southern Italy and Iberia as early
as the fifteenth century, but also dismisses the Slavic slave trade
that dominated eastern Europe for centuries. Instead, Europe is
presented as either a place where slavery did not exist or the
epicenter for the idea of antislavery. In the section "Ending
Discrimination" in his chapter "Social Revolutions," Daly argues that
the "Christian exhortation to 'love one another' and to 'be a servant
to others' played a crucial role ... in the fight against slavery"
(p. 393). And while rightly pointing to Quakers, Methodists, and
Mennonites as "forming the backbone of abolitionism," such selective
interpretation fails to address the slew of religious justifications
for slavery which permeated the era, from the Code Noir's
paternalistic dehumanization of African slaves to the critical role
missionaries played in the early formation of the Atlantic slave
trade along the African coast (p. 394). Daly also implies that
slavery was something benevolently given up by Europeans, giving
little attention to Black people's involvement in the abolitionist
movements and outright forgetting his own mention of the slave
rebellion in Saint-Dominque leading to "the French revolutionaries'
abolition of slavery" when he argues that the French abolished
slavery in 1794 "out of purely humanistic concerns" (pp. 272, 394).
While potentially dismissed as a semantic mistake, this omission
highlights a theme of selective forgetting seen in similar
discussions of decolonization, which is presented as simply a side
effect of the Cold War, and organized labor, which is only briefly
mentioned and given little importance in the wider changes within
industrial European society.

Daly claims in the introduction that this second edition corrects
some concerns related to gender and other issues. Unfortunately, it
seems these concerns have been addressed minimally at best. Ancient
Greece and Rome, which Daly gives very little attention to in his
larger thesis, are raised up as the vanguard of philosophy and
administration. Still, the author fails to include any reference to
the women and enslaved people who were instrumental in defining those
societies. The first significant mention of women comes in the
author's evaluation of medieval elites, beginning with a discussion
of courtly love while attempting to articulate the role of women
within leadership positions. Though an appropriate and necessary
addition to this edition of book, Daly quickly moves on to discuss
Chinese foot binding and the status of women in the Islamic world,
again casting Europe as more "advanced," claiming "European women of
the Middle Ages enjoyed high status and extensive legal rights by
world historical standard" (p. 44). Similar sections appear
throughout the book, including discussions of nineteenth- and
twentieth-century suffrage movements, though any reader desiring more
information on the role of women in the rise of the West will be left
wanting.

Such shortcomings and issues could potentially be understandable in
such an expansive volume, but the tone of handwaving and
"whataboutisms" in discussing the dark or understudied elements of
Europe's global connections remains one of the pivotal shortfalls of
this book. Daly should be commended for attempting to address this
critically important question regarding "the rise of the West" and
the history of the world, but it would have been much more successful
if he had taken into account the greater nuances of that world in
this volume. _The Rise of Western Power_ could serve as an
introduction to these issues, but does little more than continue a
long tradition of European exceptionalism that remains so problematic
in the current debates over the use and misuse of history and how we
educate our students in the classroom and the wider community.

Citation: Jacob Ivey. Review of Daly, Jonathan, _The Rise of Western
Power: a Comparative History of Western Civilization (2nd ed.)_.
H-Empire, H-Net Reviews. July, 2022.
URL: https://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=57893

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons
Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States
License.



H-Net Review [H-Sci-Med-Tech]: Levasseur on Eller, 'Bradbury Beyond Apollo'

Andrew Stewart
 



Best regards,
Andrew Stewart

Begin forwarded message:

From: H-Net Staff via H-REVIEW <h-review@...>
Date: July 27, 2022 at 8:32:27 AM EDT
To: h-review@...
Cc: H-Net Staff <revhelp@...>
Subject: H-Net Review [H-Sci-Med-Tech]:  Levasseur on Eller, 'Bradbury Beyond Apollo'
Reply-To: h-review@...

Jonathan R. Eller.  Bradbury Beyond Apollo.  Urbana  University of
Illinois Press, 2020.  376 pp.  $34.95 (cloth), ISBN
978-0-252-04341-3.

Reviewed by Jennifer Levasseur (National Air and Space Museum)
Published on H-Sci-Med-Tech (July, 2022)
Commissioned by Penelope K. Hardy

<p>Few authors spent as much time at the forefront of their field as
did Ray Bradbury. In _Bradbury Beyond Apollo_, the concluding book of
his Bradbury biographical trilogy, Jonathan R. Eller (director of the
Center for Ray Bradbury Studies at Indiana University) captures the
final four decades of the prolific writer's epic life. This
conclusion presents one of the most famous science fiction authors of
the twentieth century as one of the central public figures charged
with answering for the realization of the scientific and technical
capabilities of the Space Age. By bringing us this story of
Bradbury's proximity to both the real and imagined spaces of space
exploration, Eller confirms the significance of, but ultimately
missed opportunities for, the author's writing and other creative
projects. Eller's review of his muse's last forty years of work
brings to a satisfying conclusion a decade-long project to recount
the life on one of America's most prolific and respected writers.

From the point of view of a novice Bradbury fan, Eller's detailed
descriptions of Bradbury's process of developing his work from
inception to publication can only be described as exhaustive. It
never ceases to amaze when a prolific published author or historical
figure leaves behind evidence of nearly every step of their process.
For a researcher and historian, this is dream material to tap into:
extensive personal archives including collections of personal
letters, diaries, and even margin notes of draft materials provide
incredibly rich source material from which to develop not only one
but three biographical publications on a single subject. And few
compare in terms of personal connections as Bradbury. The book's
index reads like a laundry list of the most prominent names in
science, technology, literature, politics, and celebrity culture of
the last fifty years at least. That speaks to the generosity of
Bradbury as a writer, connecting to so many from such varied
backgrounds, both in terms of his own work and also his support for
their work.

Not unlike other fiction writers facing adaptation opportunities
throughout this same time frame (Stephen King comes to mind),
Bradbury was clearly conflicted by the desire to sell the material in
a visual format rather than in words. One can imagine Bradbury and
his community of writer friends bemoaning these challenges in their
personal meetings and correspondence, something Eller alludes to as
part of Bradbury's life in the late 1970s in particular. More general
fans of science fiction writing and film will recognize the
centrality of Bradbury to this community with mentions of the most
prominent franchises in film especially, but also his reach into
other worlds, like that of Disney. As a child of the late 1970s, I am
a bit awestruck to realize just how much Bradbury influenced favorite
experiences like viewing the masterful directing of Irvin Kirschner
in fan favorite _Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back_, or visiting
Epcot Center in its first years after opening.

Condensing forty years of work, the entire second half of Bradbury's
life, into the third of three books speaks to a number of challenging
aspects of coming to Bradbury's story with little prior experience
with the author. This book is not for that reader, me included, who
has a tangential relationship to this period as a space historian.
And this is perhaps the greatest disappointment of Eller's book:
putting a reference to the Apollo program in the book's title creates
an expectation of a reasonable level of research. Eller, who
otherwise makes strong connections between Bradbury's interests and
writing to the actual space program, makes a fair number of early
errors in referencing both the locations and language of the space
program. While common through recent years, one of the hallmarks of
casual references, even in the scholarly community, to the history of
human spaceflight is the use of the gendered term "manned" and
"Mankind" (Eller uses a capitalized form for some unknown reason).
For the space historian, this reads as less-than-serious examination
of the topic, as does the utter lack of references to the rich space
exploration historiography that has developed over the last twenty
years especially. Likewise, it took a number of online searches to
understand the origins of Eller's phrase "the Great Tale of the Space
Age," which is a bit of a mystery as it has no relationship to the
way space historians reference this period (the Heroic Age of human
spaceflight or, more commonly, just the Space Age).

<p>Editorial inconsistencies frustrated this reader (checking the
National Air and Space Museum's website would have eliminated the
book's overuse of ampersands), but that can be mostly overlooked in
favor of the deeply detailed stories of where Ray Bradbury, an
American literary legend, chose to spend his time in the second half
of his career. To say the author was prolific is an understatement,
and his fickle relationship with Hollywood in terms of adaptations is
hardly a surprise considering other great, though never adequately
adapted, fictional material sitting on library shelves (e.g., _Dune_
by Frank Herbert [1965], until just recently). While Bradbury's
imaginative take on science made some very public opportunities for
collaboration go up in flames, Eller illuminates the life and
eventual death of this great American writer in a way that truly
enriches any reader's understanding of him. This quiet yet present
cultural icon may not always have had the impact he hoped for, but
Bradbury clearly left a written legacy meriting a three-volume
biography.

Citation: Jennifer Levasseur. Review of Eller, Jonathan R., _Bradbury
Beyond Apollo_. H-Sci-Med-Tech, H-Net Reviews. July, 2022.
URL: https://www.h-net.org/reviews/showrev.php?id=57827

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons
Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States
License.



Re: An invitation to a forum

Walter Lippmann
 

Thanks, Miguel. I'll pass.

 

 

Walter

===============

 

All Walter Lippmann, would have to do , to inform himself about

what Alexander Reid Ross,calls the ,"fascist creep," of far right

ideas into the left, , and organizational connections made , between

neo-fascists and leftist activists , over the last couple decades is

read , "An Investigation Into Red-Brown Alliances: Third Positionism,

Russia, Ukraine, Syria, And The Western Left,"

https://libcom.org/article/investigation-red-brown-alliances-third-positionism-russia-ukraine-syria-and-western-left

, which usefully condenses ,

https://www.akpress.org/against-the-fascist-creep.html .

 

 

Michael Pugliese

 

 

 

 

 


Re: The correct way to denazify

Michael Karadjis
 

(ANSA) - ROME, MAY 26 - League leader Matteo Salvini reiterated his opposition to Italy sending more weapons to Ukraine during an an ANSA Forum on Thursday.
    "The most powerful weapon will be diplomacy, not missiles or warheads," Salvini said when asked about the policy of giving military aid to Kyiv following the Russian invasion.
    "We are sending aid to save lives and defending the national interest involves doing everything to avoid sending more weapons.
    "I'm counting on no more talk of sending weapons but of sending diplomats.
    "I hope there is no (new) vote on sending weapons.
    "If there is, the League will reiterate that the most powerful weapon is diplomacy.”

https://www.ansa.it/english/news/politics/2022/05/26/ukraine-do-everything-not-to-send-more-arms-salvini_4064c49c-0c12-43df-a794-1cdedd0c7cbf.html

Italian right-wing firebrand Matteo Salvini is on the defensive over aborted plans to visit Moscow in late May as part of a trip paid for by the Russian government.

The Russian embassy in Italy said on social media over the weekend that it had purchased Aeroflot tickets for a trip from Istanbul to Moscow for Salvini and his entourage as sanctions against the Russian government over its war on Ukraine made it difficult to make travel bookings from within the EU.

Salvini, once an outspoken admirer of Russian President Vladimir Putin, claims that he planned to visit Moscow as part of efforts to stop the war. The trip never took place due to widespread criticism from within the Italian government, of which his League party is a part.

https://www.politico.eu/article/matteo-salvini-russia-vladimir-putin-trip-moscow-ukraine-war/

Share of adults who feel sympathy towards Ukraine in the European Union in 2022, by country  

Italy: Totally agree 54%, tend to agree 34% = 88%; tend to disagree 6%, totally disagree 4% = 10%

https://www.statista.com/statistics/1307765/eu-sympathy-ukraine/

Yes, Meloni has caught the vibe and therefore opportunistically replaced her old pro-Putinism (https://www.facebook.com/giorgiameloni.paginaufficiale/posts/complimenti-a-vladimir-putin-per-la-sua-quarta-elezione-a-presidente-della-feder/10156154246102645/) with strong support for Ukraine; she could do this because her association with Putin had not been as absolute, over the top as that of Salvini and Berlusconi (who met Putin in a Crimean vineyard in 2014 to toast his annexation of Crimea). So she could do it with a straighter face. She’s riding top of the polls. Salvini and Lega’s support has relatively crashed since start of year – yes, he was forced to shamefacedly say Putin was wrong to invade (especially after being physically attacked in Poland over his love for Putin), but after years and years of Putinism people can hardly take it seriously.

Obviously, Putin’s war is not just a crime “but a mistake” as we keep hearing. The entire world of fascists, Nazis, white-supremacists and fare-rightists loved him as the God of the White Race, especially as his crimes against humanity tended to be directed against bad Arabs and Muslims such as Syrians and Chechens. The entire global far right was with Putin on Syria (even those who didn’t like Putin much loved Assad). But then he went and attacked another “white” country, and the refugees in Europe this time are white. Naturally, there will be fall-out. A common reaction is revulsion against “brother wars” and the view that “globalists” and “Jews” in both Russia and Ukraine and the West caused this war between “white” nations: https://warontherocks.com/2022/03/how-are-putins-far-right-fans-in-the-west-reacting-to-his-war/

Naturally, that would happen among US fascists as well.

Jeffrey Masko: “Your links are old concerning the U.S. pro-putin bloc.”

Perhaps, but this is not old: at a recent white nationalist event in Florida organised by the America First Political Action Conference (AFPAC), racist Nick Fuentes prompted the crowd, “Can we get a round of applause for Russia?” The crowd responded by shouting: “Putin! Putin!”

“See Heimbach, founder of the pro-Confederate Traditional Workers Party, spectacular implosion”

Not sure what happened to Heimbach – I heard he dropped Naziism and race wars in favour of “Marxism-Leninism”: and workers unity??


On Wed, Jul 27, 2022 at 2:49 AM Vladimiro Giacche' <vladimiro.giacche@...> wrote:
Once again, I can answer only regarding Italy : 

In Italy a majority of Italian population from the very start of this war opposes sending arms to Ukraine (around 63% in the last opinion polls; the polls since February NEVER gave an opposite result) , while around 39% (following a recent opinion poll) even thinks Putin is right. 
So Lega etc. probably LOST votes. 

We haven’t a social breakdown of these data, but I personally doubt that the working class in Italy has the “sense of solidarity etc.” mentioned in the passage below. I personally observed more “solidarity” in the upper class (this is only anecdotal evidence though). 


Inviato da iPhone

Il giorno 26 lug 2022, alle ore 17:43, Michael Karadjis <mkaradjis@...> ha scritto:


No, on the contrary, they must adapt, for votes, because the European working classes have a natural sense of solidarity with their fellow Ukrainian workers being butchered  by some fascist-led imperial superpower. That is only normal.


Interview with Michael Pröbsting on Arab Satellite Channel WATAN TV

RKOB
 

On Egypt, Zionism & Islamophobia: Interview with Michael Pröbsting on Arab Satellite Channel WATAN TV

Report by the RCIT’s Media Team, 27 July 2022

https://www.thecommunists.net/rcit/michael-probsting-speaks-on-arab-satellite-channel-watan-tv-about-egypt-zionism-islamophobia/


FYI - forum on Ukraine

Ken Hiebert
 



A Message from International Manifesto Group:

 

Dear registrants,

Thank you for registering to attend The Conflict Over Ukraine: Where should the Left Stand. This will be a most important webinar and the International Manifesto Group is thrilled to bring an array of left voices from around the world to weigh in on the ongoing war in Ukraine and its implications.

Some registrants have raised concerns about the registration protocols and pointed to some other techincal issues. We have rectified these issues so as to make it easier for those that register going forward .We are writing here to provide the Zoom link to attend this event, which you can find below.

 

Here is the Zoom link you can use to attend this event: https://us06web.zoom.us/j/81031915031?pwd=cGMrR1ZEVDRzQmZEUzNiN0NRaW9zZz09

Please note that we will also send the Zoom link by email on the morning of the event.

You can also watch the event live on our Youtube channel at youtube.com/geopoliticaleconomy

 

Thank you to all those who have raised concerns and if you encounter any further problems, please don't hesitate to reach out to secretary@... for assistance.

 

Best,

Brendan Devlin

On behalf of the International Manifesto Group


2301 - 2320 of 20595