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Politico: Europe’s leaders fall out of key on Ukraine

Bradley Mayer
 

After Lloyd Austin, calls for a ceasefire become a chorus as Europeans join in:

https://www.politico.eu/article/europes-leaders-fall-out-of-key-on-ukraine/ 

We were told that NATO was champing at the bit to wage aggressive proxy war.


India has a key role to play in a possible new world order | Prasanth Radhakrishnan | The Morning Star

Kevin Lindemann and Cathy Campo
 


https://www.morningstaronline.co.uk/article/f/india-has-key-role-play-possible-new-world-order

India has a key role to play in a possible new world order

A non-aligned future for the global South raises immense challenges and glimpses of hope for India and other nations, writes PRASANTH RADHAKRISHNAN

IN THE first half of April 2022, India’s External Affairs Minister Subrahmanyam Jaishankar made some revealing remarks at a press conference in Washington DC.

He was standing beside US Secretary of State Antony Blinken and US Secretary of Defence Lloyd Austin.

When asked about India’s purchase of Russian oil, Jaishankar said: “If you’re looking at energy purchases from Russia, I’d suggest that your attention should be focused on Europe.

“We do buy some energy, which is necessary for our energy security. But I suspect, looking at figures, our total purchases for the month would be less than what Europe does in an afternoon.”

Jaishankar’s statement was not unusual. He and his colleagues have been pushing back against the West’s “concerns” and “advice” to India about its stance on Russia in the Ukraine conflict, including India’s refusal to vote against Russia at the United Nations as well as India’s discussion with Russia to set up a payment mechanismthat would bypass sanctions imposed by the West.

Visits by Western diplomats to India did not help to alter the Indian government’s actions.

India, under the government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi, has been firmly in the US camp, taking part in reviving the Quad and signing three foundational defenceagreements with the United States.

These moves suggest that India strongly agreed with the United States’ focus on the containment of China.

Has India then shifted from this alignment with the United States based on its dealings with Russia? Is non-alignment back on the table? The answer to this question is far more complicated than it would appear on the surface.

Economics

Part of India’s recent response can be explained by simple economics. For a government dealing with mounting inflation, the prospect of oil at discounted rates from Russia was too good to resist.

Also, Russia continues to be India’s largest arms supplier, although the dependence seems to be decreasing(imports from Israel and the United States have surged in the past 30 years).

A much less noticed fact is that India also depends on Russia for fertilisers that are vital for its agricultural sector.

These economic bonds are too profitable to sever. There are precedents for this too.

After all, India did not give in to US pressure and even the threat of sanctions when it came to procuring the S-400 missile system from Russia.

Geopolitically, Russia remains key if India wants to engage in its immediate neighbourhood where it has previously missed the bus at key moments, such as during the crisis in Afghanistan.

However, at the current moment, purely economic and geopolitical perspectives are perhaps inadequate.

Strategic autonomy

India’s post-cold war approach has often been defined as strategic autonomy, which has encompassed groupings as diverse as the Brics alliance of Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa; the Shanghai Co-operation Organisation; and the Quad, comprising the United States, India, Japan and Australia.

However, India’s foreign policy in the past few decades has been characterised by a more transactional approach, taking advantage of what has made financial and strategic sense at a particular moment than any long-term perspective.

The responses of the West and its allies to the war in Ukraine indicate that such an approach has limited utility.

The sanctions regime, the seizure of assets and freezing of reserves and the attack on Russia’s currency are not mere responses to an armed conflict.

They mark actions that have been weaponised previously and deployed against countries like Cuba, Venezuela and Iran and are a warning to anyone who seeks to challenge the hegemony of the United States and its allies.

They are a sign that any substantive challenge to the current global order will be met with a harsh response. The target is Russia today. Could it be China tomorrow? India the day after?

A robust non-alignment

The current moment calls for a fresh approach, and this is where the proposal for non-alignment crops up. Although it is not a new idea, it may now have found its moment of urgency.

The genesis of the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) lay in the tradition of anti-colonial struggles.

For instance, an emergent NAM intervened critically in liberation movements in Africa.

In contrast with colonialism, which evolved and continued its predatory activities, NAM was reduced to a moral voice, and its members were isolated and preyed upon by the neoliberal global order that rose from the 1970s.

So, what does non-alignment mean today when a few men and women, with the stroke of a pen, can seize billions in foreign reserves and bar trade between two sovereign countries?

It is clear that in order for non-alignment to be effective, it cannot be restricted to transactional relationships or mere moral posturing.

It is also clear that the non-alignment of today must be based on the demand for the transformation of the world order, which will entail the rejection of the dictatorship of the World Bank and the IMF and the enduring impact of debt, the abolition of sanctions as a tool of war, and a more equitable United Nations.

This requires the building of structures for which there are precedents. The Brics nations had the right idea with the New Development Bank, referred to as the Brics Development Bank previously, which can be a model for future blocs.

Organisations like the Union of South American Nations (Unasur) and the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (Celac) in Latin America provided examples of such groupings in action.

Such structures are, however, not built in isolation or merely because a few leaders decree it.

Their foundation must be based on a two-pronged strategy by individual countries.

One prong must be a renewed emphasis on self-reliance in economic development and scientific and technological research.

This is perhaps what India lost out on when it abandoned central planning and ended up being a supplier of skilled human resources and a mere recipient of both technology and goods.

The other prong has to be economic relationships that play to the strengths of each of the countries, and which can be achieved despite political and diplomatic differences.

Trade and commercial blocs in south-east Asia, Africa and Latin America all have provided hints of what this could mean and how profoundly it could affect the global order.

For India and other countries in the global South, this moment offers immense challenges and provides glimpses of a possibility of a new world.

Will India transcend its transitional approach and embrace this possibility?

There is little reason to expect any desire for change from the ruling class— but its possibility is integral to the agenda of people’s movements.

This article was produced by the Morning Star and Globetrotter. Prasanth Radhakrishnan is a journalist with Newsclick and Peoples Dispatch.




‘Poison for the people’—how an exiled activist is countering Russia’s propaganda machine

Charles Keener
 

I appreciate learning more about environmental and women led resistance to Putin among Russians.

Charles


‘Poison for the people’—how an exiled activist is countering Russia’s propaganda machine - NationofChange

Environmental activist Evgeniya Chirikova once helped save a forest in Moscow. Now she’s trying to give voice to Russian activists and journalists resisting Putin’s regime.

Russian environmental activist Evgeniya Chirikova has lived in exile for more than seven years. In the late 2000s, Chirikova, an engineer and the mother of two young children, launched a campaign to protect one of the few remaining old-growth forests near Moscow. The state was planning to build a superhighway from Moscow to St. Petersburg that would have destroyed thousands of acres of green space. The contract was eventually awarded to the French multinational Vinci and the road was ultimately built, but Chirikova’s campaign managed to draw enough attention to the issue that the centuries-old Khimki forest, known as the “green lungs of Moscow,” was largely preserved. It marked the beginning of a nascent green movement within the country.


When should we stop excusing the Russian invasion?

Charles Keener
 

A friend shared this in another group, and I don't think I have seen it here yet. It seems like a good summation to me.
Charles


Re: Grave Early Warning Observational Signs for Pending Near-Term AMOC Ocean Circulation System Collapse | Paul Beckwith, Climate System Scientist

Steven L. Robinson
 

Normally I do, but I thought the subject line was pretty self explanatory.

At  least in the popular science media, the question of whether the AMOC Ocean Circulation System is on the brink of a near term system collapse seems to be  highly controversial.

You are right that such a collapse would be catastrophic for Northern Europe (at least).  The effect of such an event on the world climate would be an interesting question. 

The last such collapse. called the "Younger Dryas" period. delayed but did not ultimately stop the warming following the last ice age.  The earlier collapse occurred before humanity had pumped billions of tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere so one wonders whether the climate feedback to a collapse of the AMOC Ocean Circulation System now would be as severe or as long lasting as that which occurred in the Younger Dryas period.

SR

On 05/15/2022 10:54 AM David Walters <dwaltersmia@...> wrote:


[It would be helpful when one posts to INTRODUCE the article with a summary. Posting links with not intro is something that is frowned upon here.]



Re: Grave Early Warning Observational Signs for Pending Near-Term AMOC Ocean Circulation System Collapse | Paul Beckwith, Climate System Scientist

David Walters
 

[It would be helpful when one posts to INTRODUCE the article with a summary. Posting links with not intro is something that is frowned upon here.]

The advent of a circulation system collapse is an interesting counter-narrative, to a large degree, of global climate change that sees an increasing warming of the planet to evey one and every things detriment. Depending on how such a collapse occurs, it brings us full circle to the 1970s era of "climate science" (such as it existed 50 years ago) which was based on an ignorance of greenhouse gas emissions but almost entirely on circulation of the oceans, especially the relationship between the Gulf Stream and the colder waters in and north of the Denmark Straight (the area of the North Atlantic that is defined by Iceland in the SE and Greenland to the NW.). If the *force* of the Gulf Stream were to collapse, the flow from the colder artic waters would "rush in" to the North Atlantic, precipitating an new Ice Age, as temperature in the entire northern Atlantic Ocean would drop by many degrees. This is the basis for all Ice Age dooms-day scenarios. It is a scary thought.

David


Grave Early Warning Observational Signs for Pending Near-Term AMOC Ocean Circulation System Collapse | Paul Beckwith, Climate System Scientist

Steven L. Robinson
 

https://paulbeckwith.net/2022/05/14/grave-early-warning-observational-signs-for-pending-near-term-amoc-ocean-circulation-system-collapse/




Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S21 FE 5G, an AT&T 5G smartphone


Re: NYT: Israeli Police Attack Mourners at Palestinian Journalist’s Funeral

Jeffrey Masko <j.alan.masko@...>
 

My post referred to an early one I made about how media structures work. I even used a link to a film to help explicate those in case you didn’t want to read something more about the subject. 

If you don’t know what I’m talking about that’s certainly not my fault.  Take your pissing contest and anti-intellectualism  elsewhere.  And try David Snow instead of Lakoff, btw framing is not an obscure concept in media studies.

You can call me Dr. Masko as I am not a working professor.


On May 15, 2022, at 9:52 AM, Jeffrey Masko <j.alan.masko@...> wrote:




On May 15, 2022, at 9:18 AM, Farans Kalosar <fkalosar101@...> wrote:

I have asked a perfectly serious question--where in the specific NYT article that Professor Masko is attacking is there any reference to "mad dictator[s], unchecked aggression, unprovoked violence, and a fight for freedom purely in a defensive mode?"

The answer is that--silence being the evidence--there is none.  Ergo--the post to which I was replying is not a serious entry in a vigorous but civil debate.  There is nothing "childish" in pointing that out, and this is not a "taunt."

George Lakoff's obsessive nattering about "framing" is merely a metaphor that has been metastasized to a theory through the unnecessary proliferation of bourgeois academic "disciplines."  This is an intellectual disease.  


Re: NYT: Israeli Police Attack Mourners at Palestinian Journalist’s Funeral

Jeffrey Masko <j.alan.masko@...>
 




On May 15, 2022, at 9:18 AM, Farans Kalosar <fkalosar101@...> wrote:

I have asked a perfectly serious question--where in the specific NYT article that Professor Masko is attacking is there any reference to "mad dictator[s], unchecked aggression, unprovoked violence, and a fight for freedom purely in a defensive mode?"

The answer is that--silence being the evidence--there is none.  Ergo--the post to which I was replying is not a serious entry in a vigorous but civil debate.  There is nothing "childish" in pointing that out, and this is not a "taunt."

George Lakoff's obsessive nattering about "framing" is merely a metaphor that has been metastasized to a theory through the unnecessary proliferation of bourgeois academic "disciplines."  This is an intellectual disease.  


Re: Having Sex with Women is Gay--Republican Seer

Farans Kalosar
 

Sheer whataboutery..  Next time, do mention the baby seals--eh?

This is particularly obvious since your vague assertions about the "next big war" lack foundation and assume a case that you should IMO make, however briefly, before alluding to it. What exactly do you mean?  You are inviting otheres to respond to a critique that you have not even outlined so that you will have something to react against.

The intellectual disease of *ick Fuentes--a sense of irony so deadened by narcissism and the rejection of fact that it no longer has any sense of its own ridiculousness--was manifested in the universities long ago by the rise to power of ":theory" (mostly deconstructionism), which is so self-parodic to begin with that it accepts obvious, indeed crude, parody (Sokal) as a "contribution."  This has now filtered down as a kind of folk meme to the Republican masses--or has spontaneously co-generated in the general climate of the postmodern ideology that has become the last refuge of capitalism

These clowns live in a continual state of intellectual excitement as manifested by their ability to say the kinds of things that Fuentes and Trump say continually and that are accepted in a kind of mystical ecstasy by their followers.  This is an important subject, albeit one that few are addressing.

Again, what "big war" are you talking about particularly, and why should it be forbidden to discuss anything else?


What could go wrong if railroads eliminate conductors? | Berry Craig | People's World

Kevin Lindemann and Cathy Campo
 


Re: NYT: Israeli Police Attack Mourners at Palestinian Journalist’s Funeral

Farans Kalosar
 

I have asked a perfectly serious question--where in the specific NYT article that Professor Masko is attacking is there any reference to "mad dictator[s], unchecked aggression, unprovoked violence, and a fight for freedom purely in a defensive mode?"

The answer is that--silence being the evidence--there is none.  Ergo--the post to which I was replying is not a serious entry in a vigorous but civil debate.  There is nothing "childish" in pointing that out, and this is not a "taunt."

George Lakoff's obsessive nattering about "framing" is merely a metaphor that has been metastasized to a theory through the unnecessary proliferation of bourgeois academic "disciplines."  This is an intellectual disease.  


Re: NYT: Israeli Police Attack Mourners at Palestinian Journalist’s Funeral

Anthony Boynton
 

Jeff actually has a point here. Why don't both of you move on to another thread. Instead of Farans' sarcasm and Jeff's whining, why don't you both post something substantial about the media or maybe about the information war within the Russian war against Ukraine. 

Anthony

On Sun, May 15, 2022 at 9:21 AM Jeffrey Masko <j.alan.masko@...> wrote:
I was talking about the parallel narrative frames that the New York time uses as ideological shortcuts. I don’t think you understand the point of my post. 

I guess childish taunts do not deserve a post by our moderators, but calling out bullshit does?

Don’t expect a response from me if your post doesn’t make any sense.


On May 14, 2022, at 8:16 PM, Farans Kalosar <fkalosar101@...> wrote:


The topic post draws attention to a reported attack by Israeli police and quoted statements by said police.  Where in the New York Times piece cited is there anything about  "mad dictator, unchecked aggression, unprovoked violence, and a fight for freedom purely in a defensive mode?"  

Perhaps Professor Masko was responding to a different post and attached his--of course irrefutable--comment to this one by mistake?  


Re: NYT: Israeli Police Attack Mourners at Palestinian Journalist’s Funeral

Jeffrey Masko <j.alan.masko@...>
 

I was talking about the parallel narrative frames that the New York time uses as ideological shortcuts. I don’t think you understand the point of my post. 

I guess childish taunts do not deserve a post by our moderators, but calling out bullshit does?

Don’t expect a response from me if your post doesn’t make any sense.


On May 14, 2022, at 8:16 PM, Farans Kalosar <fkalosar101@...> wrote:


The topic post draws attention to a reported attack by Israeli police and quoted statements by said police.  Where in the New York Times piece cited is there anything about  "mad dictator, unchecked aggression, unprovoked violence, and a fight for freedom purely in a defensive mode?"  

Perhaps Professor Masko was responding to a different post and attached his--of course irrefutable--comment to this one by mistake?  


Re: "America and Its Allies Want to Bleed Russia. They Really Shouldn’t."

Michael Karadjis
 

Chris Slee wrote:

“It is uncertain whether the people of the Donbas and Crimea wish to be part of Ukraine.  We know that in 2014 the people of the Donbas regarded the post-Maidan Ukrainian regime as "illegal" (to quote Ukrainian socialist Taras Bilous).  They distrusted and feared this government.  But at that time, they did not want to join Russia.  Nor did they insist on independence for the Donbas. What do they want now?  I don't know.  The war may have deepened their hatred for the Ukrainian government.  On the other hand, Russian control of the Donbas may have alienated them to such an extent that being part of Ukraine seems a lesser evil.”

 

All good points. Except for the assumption that there is a “people of Donbas”. Donbas is just a region. Donetsk and Luhansk are just two provinces. People have different opinions there, just as they do, for example, in the “US South” or in Queensland, which we in Australia used to call our “Deep North” because there were a lot of conservatives there – but it was also the state where the first Communist Party local government was elected.

 

I’m not making this point just to be difficult or pedantic. The point is that the *relative* preponderance of certain views in Donbas, or parts of it, is completely irrelevant to the Russian intervention from 2014 onwards. Of course Chris also condemns that intervention. But I think we need to be clearer on why – it is not only that we don’t support foreign intervention; or that militarising a till then non-military conflict would change the nature of the conflict, especially when pushed by foreign intervention; it is *also* that there is no “Donbas population.”

 

Donbas is ethnically mixed. Some 37% are ethnic Russian. The majority are ethnic Ukrainian. Of the Ukrainians, about half are mostly Russian-speaking, half Ukrainian-speaking. The language does not dictate ethnic identity, let alone political identity; and even Russian ethnic identity does not dictate political identity.

 

Countless surveys showed, as Chris stated, that hardly any in Donbas advocated joining Russia. But even more significantly, surveys also showed that support for regional autonomy was also very mixed. In the one third of Donbas controlled by the Russian-owned political and military forces 2014-2022, the majority support autonomy; in the two-thirds under Ukrainian government control, the majority do not, they support being in Ukraine with no autonomy. That is not because the Russian-backed forces took the “correct part”, but more likely, with 3.5 million fleeing Donbas altogether, the majority of people with the “wrong” opinions in either part fled to the other part.

 

The point being that no rationalisation at all can be made for the 2014-15 Russian military intervention and the violent seizure of town halls etc by far-right Russian nationalists.  


Chris also says it is unlikely that the Ukrainian forces can militarily defeat the Russian army and drive it out of the whole area that it has occupied. The attempt to do so might only prolong the war and cause more death and devastation.” But he also notes it is up to Ukraine whether it makes concessions, due to Russian military pressure, or not. I agree.

 

But when making this point, let’s be aware of what Ukraine has long ago offered and what its war aims are. While it has every right to try to drive Russia out of all its sovereign territory, it is clear that it knows this is unrealistic in Crimea, and that some kind of process is still necessary in the part of Donbas long under occupation.

 

On March 30, Ukraine put forward its peace proposals, including no NATO, no joining any military alliances, Ukrainian neutrality with international guarantees, and that the region of Ukraine to be guaranteed as such *does not include* either Crimea or “part of Donbas*. And that there is no military solution in Crimea, but rather a 15-year negotiation! In other words, driving Russia from “all its territory” is just not a Ukrainian war aim.

 

I mean, just how many concessions do the western leftist “pragmatic” advocates of “ceasefire and negotiations” think Ukraine should make? Should Ukraine also offer Russia the entire Black Sea coastline (since this is obviously the key war aim of Russian conquest-imperialism)? Has anyone ever found a single instance of the US telling Ukraine it cannot make any concessions (according to so many volumes of evidence-fee nonsense that keeps appearing on social media, and, sadly, sometimes here)?


On Sun, May 15, 2022 at 6:49 AM Chris Slee <chris_w_slee@...> wrote:
Bradley Mayer says:  "What should be the proper role of the Left and socialists for when the US/NATO and Zelensky sells Ukraine down the river?  It is to be very sure that WE are the only ones left standing for One Ukraine, Whole and Undivided, free of imperialist occupation. This is the only position that fits the definition of Justice. No Two-State "solution" in Ukraine!"

I


Ukraine’s Socialist Heritage

Dayne Goodwin
 

by John-Paul Himka, Commons, March 28
https://commons.com.ua/en/ukraines-socialist-heritage/

Putin’s Russia is raining destruction down on the citizens and infrastructure of Ukraine, supposedly in the name of the “denazification” of the country. The Russian president and his propaganda machine have been greatly exaggerating the strength of neofascist trends there, often brazenly lying. One can get the impression that the entire movement to develop Ukrainian culture and to secure an independent state is tainted by fascism. As a corrective to such notions, this article briefly surveys the history of the socialist movement in Ukraine.




International conference of European Solidarity with Ukraine

Dayne Goodwin
 

Report: 

On May 5 and 6, 2022, a two-day international conference of the European Solidarity Network with Ukraine with the support of the NGO “Social Movement” was held in Lviv, Ukraine. The international delegation included left-wing politicians, parliamentarians, trade unionists, journalists from Austria, Argentina, Belgium, the United Kingdom, Denmark, Spain, Germany, Poland, Finland, France and Switzerland. Published here is a report by Tom Harris an activist of the Public and Commercial Services Union who attended.



Re: Having Sex with Women is Gay--Republican Seer

Lily (Nao)
 

He is a clown. He does it to get click baits and earn money on social media via tv-show like cultural environment at the moralistic Anglo-Saxon political sphere. That it. Similarly various token conservatives like Tim Pool or token queer persons like cateboykami, Blair White, etc.

It is shame that leftist spend time on such scandalous clowns instead of far more dangerous people around National Interest who has the means to execute their worst war fantasies about the upcoming big war.


When Baseball Gets Radical | Paul Buhle | The Progressive

Kevin Lindemann and Cathy Campo
 


Mass Protest Is Rising — Can It Confront Global Capitalism? | William I. Robinson | Truthout

Kevin Lindemann and Cathy Campo
 

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