Topics

Differntiating between cell phones and landlines - possible?

Bruce N
 

Hello,

Is there any way to differentiate between cell phone numbers or exchanges vs landlines? or this is all blurry? I wonder if there is a real-time database for this either on localcallingguide or elsewhere on the web.

Thanks,
Bruce

Mike Rudko
 

Bruce;
 Yeah. If you have access to a lerg, or just a npa-nxx lookup portal. There owned by 1000 blocks. 
& within this portal you could read owners name. like AT&T, or Cingular, etc. AT&T would be land line. Cingular is wireless.   

For instance, I'm in Detroit. 313-543-1 would be one carrier, 313-543-2 would be another. As a whole in 1000 block increments. 
Hope that helps?  

Bruce N
 

Thanks for feedback Mike.

1- I thought a whole exchange like 313-543 is assigned to a single company and they are done in block of 9999 numbers and not 1000.

2- There are carriers that do both landline and cell phone and so by name you can't tell if a number is really cell phone or landline.

Am I correct with above assumptions?

I don't have access to a lerg. How can I?

Thanks,


On Mar 10, 2018 12:40 AM, "Mike Rudko via Groups.Io" <mikerudko=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Bruce;
 Yeah. If you have access to a lerg, or just a npa-nxx lookup portal. There owned by 1000 blocks. 
& within this portal you could read owners name. like AT&T, or Cingular, etc. AT&T would be land line. Cingular is wireless.   

For instance, I'm in Detroit. 313-543-1 would be one carrier, 313-543-2 would be another. As a whole in 1000 block increments. 
Hope that helps?  


Mike Rudko
 

Yeah. used to be 10,000 block. But that is why w eused up npa's so much. 

cell carrier would need an exchange in an area, request 1 from PSC for that state, only way to get 1 is to get the whole 10000.  
Another reason we burned up npa's so fast. pscs got smart & started to dispatch them at a 1000 level. 

as for nxx search. try this one. there pretty good. 
https://www.telcodata.us/search-area-code-exchange-detail

http://localcallingguide.com/lca_prefix.php?npa=313&nxx=543&x=1&ocn=&region=&lata=&switch=&pastdays=&nextdays=

Though it is mostly showing full 10000. 
The 2nd link shows to the 1000 block. local calling guide web site.  


Chris Hodges
 

I think you are forgetting about number porting. I know from personal experience that a landline number can be ported to a mobile number and I suspect that a mobile number can be ported to a landline number. So if you use the block method you may know what the number was originally, but not necessarily what it is currently.

On 3/10/2018 1:10 AM, Mike Rudko via Groups.Io wrote:

Yeah. used to be 10,000 block. But that is why w eused up npa's so much. 

cell carrier would need an exchange in an area, request 1 from PSC for that state, only way to get 1 is to get the whole 10000.  
Another reason we burned up npa's so fast. pscs got smart & started to dispatch them at a 1000 level. 

as for nxx search. try this one. there pretty good. 
https://www.telcodata.us/search-area-code-exchange-detail

http://localcallingguide.com/lca_prefix.php?npa=313&nxx=543&x=1&ocn=&region=&lata=&switch=&pastdays=&nextdays=

Though it is mostly showing full 10000. 
The 2nd link shows to the 1000 block. local calling guide web site.  



Bruce N
 

Exactly. But it's a bit safe to say no cell number would be changed to landline given people are dumping them.

Would access to LNP authority give the cell phone vs landline distinction?


Thanks,

On Mar 10, 2018 8:35 AM, "Chris Hodges via Groups.Io" <nvideon=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I think you are forgetting about number porting. I know from personal experience that a landline number can be ported to a mobile number and I suspect that a mobile number can be ported to a landline number. So if you use the block method you may know what the number was originally, but not necessarily what it is currently.

On 3/10/2018 1:10 AM, Mike Rudko via Groups.Io wrote:

Yeah. used to be 10,000 block. But that is why w eused up npa's so much. 

cell carrier would need an exchange in an area, request 1 from PSC for that state, only way to get 1 is to get the whole 10000.  
Another reason we burned up npa's so fast. pscs got smart & started to dispatch them at a 1000 level. 

as for nxx search. try this one. there pretty good. 
https://www.telcodata.us/search-area-code-exchange-detail

http://localcallingguide.com/lca_prefix.php?npa=313&nxx=543&x=1&ocn=&region=&lata=&switch=&pastdays=&nextdays=

Though it is mostly showing full 10000. 
The 2nd link shows to the 1000 block. local calling guide web site.  



troy.cryer <troy.cryer@...>
 

Not true. Cell numbers get converted to Landlines all the time when businesses grow from startups to brick & mortar. 

Best regards, 

 
Troy
 
Troy Cryer | President | Comm3 |  6652 Pinecrest Drive Suite 400 | Plano, TX 75024 | (214) 389-2625 Direct/Mobile/Fax www.comm3.net


On Mar 10, 2018, at 7:55 AM, Bruce N <brucevoip@...> wrote:

Exactly. But it's a bit safe to say no cell number would be changed to landline given people are dumping them.

Would access to LNP authority give the cell phone vs landline distinction?


Thanks,

On Mar 10, 2018 8:35 AM, "Chris Hodges via Groups.Io" <nvideon=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I think you are forgetting about number porting. I know from personal experience that a landline number can be ported to a mobile number and I suspect that a mobile number can be ported to a landline number. So if you use the block method you may know what the number was originally, but not necessarily what it is currently.

On 3/10/2018 1:10 AM, Mike Rudko via Groups.Io wrote:

Yeah. used to be 10,000 block. But that is why w eused up npa's so much. 

cell carrier would need an exchange in an area, request 1 from PSC for that state, only way to get 1 is to get the whole 10000.  
Another reason we burned up npa's so fast. pscs got smart & started to dispatch them at a 1000 level. 

as for nxx search. try this one. there pretty good. 
https://www.telcodata.us/search-area-code-exchange-detail

http://localcallingguide.com/lca_prefix.php?npa=313&nxx=543&x=1&ocn=&region=&lata=&switch=&pastdays=&nextdays=

Though it is mostly showing full 10000. 
The 2nd link shows to the 1000 block. local calling guide web site.  



Chris Hodges
 

That may be true, but I still think it is a requirement of the number portability act.

I am one of those people that refuse to give up a landline. I have Google Voice as my landline (i.e. I don't like giving my mobile number to everyone to avoid spam calls on my mobile). However, you can only port mobile numbers to Google Voice, so I had to first port my landline number to a mobile number (T-Mobile), then port that number to Google Voice. There must be some authority that keeps track of landline vs mobile if for nothing else text messaging capability. I can get text messages on my Google Voice number which is nice since it seems many businesses assume the number you give them is a mobile number send text messages with information on appointments, etc.


On 3/10/2018 8:55 AM, Bruce N wrote:
Exactly. But it's a bit safe to say no cell number would be changed to landline given people are dumping them.

Would access to LNP authority give the cell phone vs landline distinction?


Thanks,

On Mar 10, 2018 8:35 AM, "Chris Hodges via Groups.Io" <nvideon=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I think you are forgetting about number porting. I know from personal experience that a landline number can be ported to a mobile number and I suspect that a mobile number can be ported to a landline number. So if you use the block method you may know what the number was originally, but not necessarily what it is currently.

On 3/10/2018 1:10 AM, Mike Rudko via Groups.Io wrote:

Yeah. used to be 10,000 block. But that is why w eused up npa's so much. 

cell carrier would need an exchange in an area, request 1 from PSC for that state, only way to get 1 is to get the whole 10000.  
Another reason we burned up npa's so fast. pscs got smart & started to dispatch them at a 1000 level. 

as for nxx search. try this one. there pretty good. 
https://www.telcodata.us/search-area-code-exchange-detail

http://localcallingguide.com/lca_prefix.php?npa=313&nxx=543&x=1&ocn=&region=&lata=&switch=&pastdays=&nextdays=

Though it is mostly showing full 10000. 
The 2nd link shows to the 1000 block. local calling guide web site.  




John Novack
 

Much of this, at least in the US, is meaningless anymore, between LNP and the rise of VOIP services ( is this considered "landline" ? ) NPA's don't even represent geographic areas, and NPA-NXX can appear almost anywhere. I have 2 numbers moved from mobile to VOIP in a different NPA than my residence, and another former landline moved to mobile.
Some/many/all VOIP telephony providers offer numbers just about anywhere, then with the criminal number spoofers operating worldwide with their scams, numbers become meaningless.

John Novack

troy.cryer wrote:
Not true. Cell numbers get converted to Landlines all the time when businesses grow from startups to brick & mortar. 

Best regards, 

 
Troy
 
Troy Cryer | President | Comm3 |  6652 Pinecrest Drive Suite 400 | Plano, TX 75024 | (214) 389-2625 Direct/Mobile/Fax www.comm3.net


On Mar 10, 2018, at 7:55 AM, Bruce N <brucevoip@...> wrote:

Exactly. But it's a bit safe to say no cell number would be changed to landline given people are dumping them.

Would access to LNP authority give the cell phone vs landline distinction?


Thanks,

On Mar 10, 2018 8:35 AM, "Chris Hodges via Groups.Io" <nvideon=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I think you are forgetting about number porting. I know from personal experience that a landline number can be ported to a mobile number and I suspect that a mobile number can be ported to a landline number. So if you use the block method you may know what the number was originally, but not necessarily what it is currently.

On 3/10/2018 1:10 AM, Mike Rudko via Groups.Io wrote:

Yeah. used to be 10,000 block. But that is why w eused up npa's so much. 

cell carrier would need an exchange in an area, request 1 from PSC for that state, only way to get 1 is to get the whole 10000.  
Another reason we burned up npa's so fast. pscs got smart & started to dispatch them at a 1000 level. 

as for nxx search. try this one. there pretty good. 
https://www.telcodata.us/search-area-code-exchange-detail

http://localcallingguide.com/lca_prefix.php?npa=313&nxx=543&x=1&ocn=&region=&lata=&switch=&pastdays=&nextdays=

Though it is mostly showing full 10000. 
The 2nd link shows to the 1000 block. local calling guide web site.  




-- 

Dog is my Co-pilot

Bruce N
 

Good point. If Google knows what is a cell vs landline then there has to be a way.

Knowing it fr SMS is I think not a viable way as I think messaging is done over SS7 and it's a function of Telco servers rather than LNP.

Maybe there is a flag for cell phone in LNP or because of rate centers there is a flag?

On Mar 10, 2018 9:29 AM, "Chris Hodges via Groups.Io" <nvideon=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
That may be true, but I still think it is a requirement of the number portability act.

I am one of those people that refuse to give up a landline. I have Google Voice as my landline (i.e. I don't like giving my mobile number to everyone to avoid spam calls on my mobile). However, you can only port mobile numbers to Google Voice, so I had to first port my landline number to a mobile number (T-Mobile), then port that number to Google Voice. There must be some authority that keeps track of landline vs mobile if for nothing else text messaging capability. I can get text messages on my Google Voice number which is nice since it seems many businesses assume the number you give them is a mobile number send text messages with information on appointments, etc.


On 3/10/2018 8:55 AM, Bruce N wrote:
Exactly. But it's a bit safe to say no cell number would be changed to landline given people are dumping them.

Would access to LNP authority give the cell phone vs landline distinction?


Thanks,

On Mar 10, 2018 8:35 AM, "Chris Hodges via Groups.Io" <nvideon=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I think you are forgetting about number porting. I know from personal experience that a landline number can be ported to a mobile number and I suspect that a mobile number can be ported to a landline number. So if you use the block method you may know what the number was originally, but not necessarily what it is currently.

On 3/10/2018 1:10 AM, Mike Rudko via Groups.Io wrote:

Yeah. used to be 10,000 block. But that is why w eused up npa's so much. 

cell carrier would need an exchange in an area, request 1 from PSC for that state, only way to get 1 is to get the whole 10000.  
Another reason we burned up npa's so fast. pscs got smart & started to dispatch them at a 1000 level. 

as for nxx search. try this one. there pretty good. 
https://www.telcodata.us/search-area-code-exchange-detail

http://localcallingguide.com/lca_prefix.php?npa=313&nxx=543&x=1&ocn=&region=&lata=&switch=&pastdays=&nextdays=

Though it is mostly showing full 10000. 
The 2nd link shows to the 1000 block. local calling guide web site.  




Jamie Montgomery
 

Npa's and Nxx's are geographically based, except for the toll free 8xx npa's, 9xx npa's and 500 or 555 nxx's. They are geo based for long distance billing. They are tied to rate centers which are centered on some geographic locality like a town or part of a large city. LD charges were based on a formula that gave you a distance between originating and terminating rate centers. 

Cell phone npa-nxx's are still tied to their rate center, but the cell carriers have done away with LD charges, so your neighbor can have a number from another state, easily. VoIP providers have the same option if they're big enough. 

I think whether a number is landline or otherwise is mainly a concern for the incumbent landline provider. We deal with the equipment that provides the dialtone, so we have to route the calls certain ways if it's wireless, on our own voip network, or someone else's. 

On Mar 10, 2018 9:34 AM, "John Novack" <jnovack@...> wrote:
Much of this, at least in the US, is meaningless anymore, between LNP and the rise of VOIP services ( is this considered "landline" ? ) NPA's don't even represent geographic areas, and NPA-NXX can appear almost anywhere. I have 2 numbers moved from mobile to VOIP in a different NPA than my residence, and another former landline moved to mobile.
Some/many/all VOIP telephony providers offer numbers just about anywhere, then with the criminal number spoofers operating worldwide with their scams, numbers become meaningless.

John Novack

troy.cryer wrote:
Not true. Cell numbers get converted to Landlines all the time when businesses grow from startups to brick & mortar. 

Best regards, 

 
Troy
 
Troy Cryer | President | Comm3 |  6652 Pinecrest Drive Suite 400 | Plano, TX 75024 | (214) 389-2625 Direct/Mobile/Fax www.comm3.net


On Mar 10, 2018, at 7:55 AM, Bruce N <brucevoip@...> wrote:

Exactly. But it's a bit safe to say no cell number would be changed to landline given people are dumping them.

Would access to LNP authority give the cell phone vs landline distinction?


Thanks,

On Mar 10, 2018 8:35 AM, "Chris Hodges via Groups.Io" <nvideon=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I think you are forgetting about number porting. I know from personal experience that a landline number can be ported to a mobile number and I suspect that a mobile number can be ported to a landline number. So if you use the block method you may know what the number was originally, but not necessarily what it is currently.

On 3/10/2018 1:10 AM, Mike Rudko via Groups.Io wrote:

Yeah. used to be 10,000 block. But that is why w eused up npa's so much. 

cell carrier would need an exchange in an area, request 1 from PSC for that state, only way to get 1 is to get the whole 10000.  
Another reason we burned up npa's so fast. pscs got smart & started to dispatch them at a 1000 level. 

as for nxx search. try this one. there pretty good. 
https://www.telcodata.us/search-area-code-exchange-detail

http://localcallingguide.com/lca_prefix.php?npa=313&nxx=543&x=1&ocn=&region=&lata=&switch=&pastdays=&nextdays=

Though it is mostly showing full 10000. 
The 2nd link shows to the 1000 block. local calling guide web site.  




-- 

Dog is my Co-pilot


John Garko
 

Just to add a little to conversation... I'm using VOIP at home, and have about a dozen DID numbers under my account (from all over the US).  These numbers are all a mix of legacy landlines, cell exchanges, and "voip" numbers.  They all function the same way within my setup, which is great.  

Not sure what would happen if I try and port a legacy landline back to a legacy landline carrier.  They'd probably treat it the same, even though the number hasn't been a landline in quite some time.

John

On Sat, Mar 10, 2018 at 10:18 AM, Jamie Montgomery <otiecoyote09@...> wrote:
Npa's and Nxx's are geographically based, except for the toll free 8xx npa's, 9xx npa's and 500 or 555 nxx's. They are geo based for long distance billing. They are tied to rate centers which are centered on some geographic locality like a town or part of a large city. LD charges were based on a formula that gave you a distance between originating and terminating rate centers. 

Cell phone npa-nxx's are still tied to their rate center, but the cell carriers have done away with LD charges, so your neighbor can have a number from another state, easily. VoIP providers have the same option if they're big enough. 

I think whether a number is landline or otherwise is mainly a concern for the incumbent landline provider. We deal with the equipment that provides the dialtone, so we have to route the calls certain ways if it's wireless, on our own voip network, or someone else's. 

On Mar 10, 2018 9:34 AM, "John Novack" <jnovack@...> wrote:
Much of this, at least in the US, is meaningless anymore, between LNP and the rise of VOIP services ( is this considered "landline" ? ) NPA's don't even represent geographic areas, and NPA-NXX can appear almost anywhere. I have 2 numbers moved from mobile to VOIP in a different NPA than my residence, and another former landline moved to mobile.
Some/many/all VOIP telephony providers offer numbers just about anywhere, then with the criminal number spoofers operating worldwide with their scams, numbers become meaningless.

John Novack

troy.cryer wrote:
Not true. Cell numbers get converted to Landlines all the time when businesses grow from startups to brick & mortar. 

Best regards, 

 
Troy
 
Troy Cryer | President | Comm3 |  6652 Pinecrest Drive Suite 400 | Plano, TX 75024 | (214) 389-2625 Direct/Mobile/Fax www.comm3.net


On Mar 10, 2018, at 7:55 AM, Bruce N <brucevoip@...> wrote:

Exactly. But it's a bit safe to say no cell number would be changed to landline given people are dumping them.

Would access to LNP authority give the cell phone vs landline distinction?


Thanks,

On Mar 10, 2018 8:35 AM, "Chris Hodges via Groups.Io" <nvideon=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I think you are forgetting about number porting. I know from personal experience that a landline number can be ported to a mobile number and I suspect that a mobile number can be ported to a landline number. So if you use the block method you may know what the number was originally, but not necessarily what it is currently.

On 3/10/2018 1:10 AM, Mike Rudko via Groups.Io wrote:

Yeah. used to be 10,000 block. But that is why w eused up npa's so much. 

cell carrier would need an exchange in an area, request 1 from PSC for that state, only way to get 1 is to get the whole 10000.  
Another reason we burned up npa's so fast. pscs got smart & started to dispatch them at a 1000 level. 

as for nxx search. try this one. there pretty good. 
https://www.telcodata.us/search-area-code-exchange-detail

http://localcallingguide.com/lca_prefix.php?npa=313&nxx=543&x=1&ocn=&region=&lata=&switch=&pastdays=&nextdays=

Though it is mostly showing full 10000. 
The 2nd link shows to the 1000 block. local calling guide web site.  




-- 

Dog is my Co-pilot



Bruce N
 

Hi Jamie,

"We deal with the equipment that provides the dialtone, so we have to route the calls certain ways if it's wireless, on our own voip network, or someone else's. "

What do you mean by that?

Best Regards,

On Mar 10, 2018 10:18 AM, "Jamie Montgomery" <otiecoyote09@...> wrote:
Npa's and Nxx's are geographically based, except for the toll free 8xx npa's, 9xx npa's and 500 or 555 nxx's. They are geo based for long distance billing. They are tied to rate centers which are centered on some geographic locality like a town or part of a large city. LD charges were based on a formula that gave you a distance between originating and terminating rate centers. 

Cell phone npa-nxx's are still tied to their rate center, but the cell carriers have done away with LD charges, so your neighbor can have a number from another state, easily. VoIP providers have the same option if they're big enough. 

I think whether a number is landline or otherwise is mainly a concern for the incumbent landline provider. We deal with the equipment that provides the dialtone, so we have to route the calls certain ways if it's wireless, on our own voip network, or someone else's. 

On Mar 10, 2018 9:34 AM, "John Novack" <jnovack@...> wrote:
Much of this, at least in the US, is meaningless anymore, between LNP and the rise of VOIP services ( is this considered "landline" ? ) NPA's don't even represent geographic areas, and NPA-NXX can appear almost anywhere. I have 2 numbers moved from mobile to VOIP in a different NPA than my residence, and another former landline moved to mobile.
Some/many/all VOIP telephony providers offer numbers just about anywhere, then with the criminal number spoofers operating worldwide with their scams, numbers become meaningless.

John Novack

troy.cryer wrote:
Not true. Cell numbers get converted to Landlines all the time when businesses grow from startups to brick & mortar. 

Best regards, 

 
Troy
 
Troy Cryer | President | Comm3 |  6652 Pinecrest Drive Suite 400 | Plano, TX 75024 | (214) 389-2625 Direct/Mobile/Fax www.comm3.net


On Mar 10, 2018, at 7:55 AM, Bruce N <brucevoip@...> wrote:

Exactly. But it's a bit safe to say no cell number would be changed to landline given people are dumping them.

Would access to LNP authority give the cell phone vs landline distinction?


Thanks,

On Mar 10, 2018 8:35 AM, "Chris Hodges via Groups.Io" <nvideon=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I think you are forgetting about number porting. I know from personal experience that a landline number can be ported to a mobile number and I suspect that a mobile number can be ported to a landline number. So if you use the block method you may know what the number was originally, but not necessarily what it is currently.

On 3/10/2018 1:10 AM, Mike Rudko via Groups.Io wrote:

Yeah. used to be 10,000 block. But that is why w eused up npa's so much. 

cell carrier would need an exchange in an area, request 1 from PSC for that state, only way to get 1 is to get the whole 10000.  
Another reason we burned up npa's so fast. pscs got smart & started to dispatch them at a 1000 level. 

as for nxx search. try this one. there pretty good. 
https://www.telcodata.us/search-area-code-exchange-detail

http://localcallingguide.com/lca_prefix.php?npa=313&nxx=543&x=1&ocn=&region=&lata=&switch=&pastdays=&nextdays=

Though it is mostly showing full 10000. 
The 2nd link shows to the 1000 block. local calling guide web site.  




-- 

Dog is my Co-pilot


Jamie Montgomery
 

I work for a telephone company in SC. The equipment I was talking about is the traditional telephone central office and remote equupment.. either housed in buildings, huts, or large cabinets that all the landlines terminate to in an area.  

And a ported out landline could port back to a landline, as long as the landline was in the same rate center the NPANXX is assigned to. 



On Mar 10, 2018 12:50 PM, "Bruce N" <brucevoip@...> wrote:
Hi Jamie,

"We deal with the equipment that provides the dialtone, so we have to route the calls certain ways if it's wireless, on our own voip network, or someone else's. "

What do you mean by that?

Best Regards,

On Mar 10, 2018 10:18 AM, "Jamie Montgomery" <otiecoyote09@...> wrote:
Npa's and Nxx's are geographically based, except for the toll free 8xx npa's, 9xx npa's and 500 or 555 nxx's. They are geo based for long distance billing. They are tied to rate centers which are centered on some geographic locality like a town or part of a large city. LD charges were based on a formula that gave you a distance between originating and terminating rate centers. 

Cell phone npa-nxx's are still tied to their rate center, but the cell carriers have done away with LD charges, so your neighbor can have a number from another state, easily. VoIP providers have the same option if they're big enough. 

I think whether a number is landline or otherwise is mainly a concern for the incumbent landline provider. We deal with the equipment that provides the dialtone, so we have to route the calls certain ways if it's wireless, on our own voip network, or someone else's. 

On Mar 10, 2018 9:34 AM, "John Novack" <jnovack@...> wrote:
Much of this, at least in the US, is meaningless anymore, between LNP and the rise of VOIP services ( is this considered "landline" ? ) NPA's don't even represent geographic areas, and NPA-NXX can appear almost anywhere. I have 2 numbers moved from mobile to VOIP in a different NPA than my residence, and another former landline moved to mobile.
Some/many/all VOIP telephony providers offer numbers just about anywhere, then with the criminal number spoofers operating worldwide with their scams, numbers become meaningless.

John Novack

troy.cryer wrote:
Not true. Cell numbers get converted to Landlines all the time when businesses grow from startups to brick & mortar. 

Best regards, 

 
Troy
 
Troy Cryer | President | Comm3 |  6652 Pinecrest Drive Suite 400 | Plano, TX 75024 | (214) 389-2625 Direct/Mobile/Fax www.comm3.net


On Mar 10, 2018, at 7:55 AM, Bruce N <brucevoip@...> wrote:

Exactly. But it's a bit safe to say no cell number would be changed to landline given people are dumping them.

Would access to LNP authority give the cell phone vs landline distinction?


Thanks,

On Mar 10, 2018 8:35 AM, "Chris Hodges via Groups.Io" <nvideon=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I think you are forgetting about number porting. I know from personal experience that a landline number can be ported to a mobile number and I suspect that a mobile number can be ported to a landline number. So if you use the block method you may know what the number was originally, but not necessarily what it is currently.

On 3/10/2018 1:10 AM, Mike Rudko via Groups.Io wrote:

Yeah. used to be 10,000 block. But that is why w eused up npa's so much. 

cell carrier would need an exchange in an area, request 1 from PSC for that state, only way to get 1 is to get the whole 10000.  
Another reason we burned up npa's so fast. pscs got smart & started to dispatch them at a 1000 level. 

as for nxx search. try this one. there pretty good. 
https://www.telcodata.us/search-area-code-exchange-detail

http://localcallingguide.com/lca_prefix.php?npa=313&nxx=543&x=1&ocn=&region=&lata=&switch=&pastdays=&nextdays=

Though it is mostly showing full 10000. 
The 2nd link shows to the 1000 block. local calling guide web site.  




-- 

Dog is my Co-pilot



Bruce N
 

Hi Jamie,

By "certain way" did you mean simply routing it through different carriers to save money or you have a way you know it's a cell phone you are dialing?

I doubt you have pre-knowlesge of this.

Best Regards,

On Mar 10, 2018 1:46 PM, "Jamie Montgomery" <otiecoyote09@...> wrote:
I work for a telephone company in SC. The equipment I was talking about is the traditional telephone central office and remote equupment.. either housed in buildings, huts, or large cabinets that all the landlines terminate to in an area.  

And a ported out landline could port back to a landline, as long as the landline was in the same rate center the NPANXX is assigned to. 



On Mar 10, 2018 12:50 PM, "Bruce N" <brucevoip@...> wrote:
Hi Jamie,

"We deal with the equipment that provides the dialtone, so we have to route the calls certain ways if it's wireless, on our own voip network, or someone else's. "

What do you mean by that?

Best Regards,

On Mar 10, 2018 10:18 AM, "Jamie Montgomery" <otiecoyote09@...> wrote:
Npa's and Nxx's are geographically based, except for the toll free 8xx npa's, 9xx npa's and 500 or 555 nxx's. They are geo based for long distance billing. They are tied to rate centers which are centered on some geographic locality like a town or part of a large city. LD charges were based on a formula that gave you a distance between originating and terminating rate centers. 

Cell phone npa-nxx's are still tied to their rate center, but the cell carriers have done away with LD charges, so your neighbor can have a number from another state, easily. VoIP providers have the same option if they're big enough. 

I think whether a number is landline or otherwise is mainly a concern for the incumbent landline provider. We deal with the equipment that provides the dialtone, so we have to route the calls certain ways if it's wireless, on our own voip network, or someone else's. 

On Mar 10, 2018 9:34 AM, "John Novack" <jnovack@...> wrote:
Much of this, at least in the US, is meaningless anymore, between LNP and the rise of VOIP services ( is this considered "landline" ? ) NPA's don't even represent geographic areas, and NPA-NXX can appear almost anywhere. I have 2 numbers moved from mobile to VOIP in a different NPA than my residence, and another former landline moved to mobile.
Some/many/all VOIP telephony providers offer numbers just about anywhere, then with the criminal number spoofers operating worldwide with their scams, numbers become meaningless.

John Novack

troy.cryer wrote:
Not true. Cell numbers get converted to Landlines all the time when businesses grow from startups to brick & mortar. 

Best regards, 

 
Troy
 
Troy Cryer | President | Comm3 |  6652 Pinecrest Drive Suite 400 | Plano, TX 75024 | (214) 389-2625 Direct/Mobile/Fax www.comm3.net


On Mar 10, 2018, at 7:55 AM, Bruce N <brucevoip@...> wrote:

Exactly. But it's a bit safe to say no cell number would be changed to landline given people are dumping them.

Would access to LNP authority give the cell phone vs landline distinction?


Thanks,

On Mar 10, 2018 8:35 AM, "Chris Hodges via Groups.Io" <nvideon=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I think you are forgetting about number porting. I know from personal experience that a landline number can be ported to a mobile number and I suspect that a mobile number can be ported to a landline number. So if you use the block method you may know what the number was originally, but not necessarily what it is currently.

On 3/10/2018 1:10 AM, Mike Rudko via Groups.Io wrote:

Yeah. used to be 10,000 block. But that is why w eused up npa's so much. 

cell carrier would need an exchange in an area, request 1 from PSC for that state, only way to get 1 is to get the whole 10000.  
Another reason we burned up npa's so fast. pscs got smart & started to dispatch them at a 1000 level. 

as for nxx search. try this one. there pretty good. 
https://www.telcodata.us/search-area-code-exchange-detail

http://localcallingguide.com/lca_prefix.php?npa=313&nxx=543&x=1&ocn=&region=&lata=&switch=&pastdays=&nextdays=

Though it is mostly showing full 10000. 
The 2nd link shows to the 1000 block. local calling guide web site.  




-- 

Dog is my Co-pilot



czg7777
 

In the USA the Number Portability Administration Center (NPAC) maintains the number portability database that carriers use to determine the actual carrier for any given number. This is not generally available to end users.

https://numberportability.com/about-us/

iConectiv is in the process of taking over from Neustar as the administrator of the NPAC, but only for the USA.

There is a Canadian Local Number Portability Consortium (CLNPC) that administers number portability in Canada.

http://www.clnpc.ca/

Jamie Montgomery
 

We dont.. (warning.. technucal and geeky content ahead) if an originating call from a non pprted line calls a number within the LATA, the teleohone switch will automaticalky do a Local Number Portablilty or LNP lookup to the SS7 provider (who has a copy of ir a connection to the national porting database) to see if the number has been ported or not. The information that come back helps the switch know how to route the call... either to a line, tandem, or LD carrier if it hasn't been ported, or to carrier or CLEC trunks based on what the LNP result provided, which is usually a 10 digit local routing number or LRN. 

Probably way too much info for you. I keep pretty good company with insomniacs. :)

On Mar 10, 2018 1:49 PM, "Bruce N" <brucevoip@...> wrote:
Hi Jamie,

By "certain way" did you mean simply routing it through different carriers to save money or you have a way you know it's a cell phone you are dialing?

I doubt you have pre-knowlesge of this.

Best Regards,

On Mar 10, 2018 1:46 PM, "Jamie Montgomery" <otiecoyote09@...> wrote:
I work for a telephone company in SC. The equipment I was talking about is the traditional telephone central office and remote equupment.. either housed in buildings, huts, or large cabinets that all the landlines terminate to in an area.  

And a ported out landline could port back to a landline, as long as the landline was in the same rate center the NPANXX is assigned to. 



On Mar 10, 2018 12:50 PM, "Bruce N" <brucevoip@...> wrote:
Hi Jamie,

"We deal with the equipment that provides the dialtone, so we have to route the calls certain ways if it's wireless, on our own voip network, or someone else's. "

What do you mean by that?

Best Regards,

On Mar 10, 2018 10:18 AM, "Jamie Montgomery" <otiecoyote09@...> wrote:
Npa's and Nxx's are geographically based, except for the toll free 8xx npa's, 9xx npa's and 500 or 555 nxx's. They are geo based for long distance billing. They are tied to rate centers which are centered on some geographic locality like a town or part of a large city. LD charges were based on a formula that gave you a distance between originating and terminating rate centers. 

Cell phone npa-nxx's are still tied to their rate center, but the cell carriers have done away with LD charges, so your neighbor can have a number from another state, easily. VoIP providers have the same option if they're big enough. 

I think whether a number is landline or otherwise is mainly a concern for the incumbent landline provider. We deal with the equipment that provides the dialtone, so we have to route the calls certain ways if it's wireless, on our own voip network, or someone else's. 

On Mar 10, 2018 9:34 AM, "John Novack" <jnovack@...> wrote:
Much of this, at least in the US, is meaningless anymore, between LNP and the rise of VOIP services ( is this considered "landline" ? ) NPA's don't even represent geographic areas, and NPA-NXX can appear almost anywhere. I have 2 numbers moved from mobile to VOIP in a different NPA than my residence, and another former landline moved to mobile.
Some/many/all VOIP telephony providers offer numbers just about anywhere, then with the criminal number spoofers operating worldwide with their scams, numbers become meaningless.

John Novack

troy.cryer wrote:
Not true. Cell numbers get converted to Landlines all the time when businesses grow from startups to brick & mortar. 

Best regards, 

 
Troy
 
Troy Cryer | President | Comm3 |  6652 Pinecrest Drive Suite 400 | Plano, TX 75024 | (214) 389-2625 Direct/Mobile/Fax www.comm3.net


On Mar 10, 2018, at 7:55 AM, Bruce N <brucevoip@...> wrote:

Exactly. But it's a bit safe to say no cell number would be changed to landline given people are dumping them.

Would access to LNP authority give the cell phone vs landline distinction?


Thanks,

On Mar 10, 2018 8:35 AM, "Chris Hodges via Groups.Io" <nvideon=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I think you are forgetting about number porting. I know from personal experience that a landline number can be ported to a mobile number and I suspect that a mobile number can be ported to a landline number. So if you use the block method you may know what the number was originally, but not necessarily what it is currently.

On 3/10/2018 1:10 AM, Mike Rudko via Groups.Io wrote:

Yeah. used to be 10,000 block. But that is why w eused up npa's so much. 

cell carrier would need an exchange in an area, request 1 from PSC for that state, only way to get 1 is to get the whole 10000.  
Another reason we burned up npa's so fast. pscs got smart & started to dispatch them at a 1000 level. 

as for nxx search. try this one. there pretty good. 
https://www.telcodata.us/search-area-code-exchange-detail

http://localcallingguide.com/lca_prefix.php?npa=313&nxx=543&x=1&ocn=&region=&lata=&switch=&pastdays=&nextdays=

Though it is mostly showing full 10000. 
The 2nd link shows to the 1000 block. local calling guide web site.  




-- 

Dog is my Co-pilot