Topics

dialing plan database and local calling areas

John Nevius
 

I'm confused.  As I read the NANPA website, they say they do not provide local calling area information:

Here are some things you will NOT find on this site.

  • Zip codes - information on the correspondence between zip codes and area codes is available through various sources on the web. Find them by using a search engine.
  • Local calling areas - Local phone companies publish tariffs that contain calling rates and free calling areas. Look in the front of your phone directory or contact your phone company to see if they will provide this information to you. Several companies compile the information found in tariffs and sell local calling area databases.

My experience is that determining what is the expected local calling area is difficult and in general LCADS is not particularly accurate.  Where are you getting this detail?



czg7777@...
 

OP is referring to the dial plan for a given NPA (i.e. whether the caller must dial 7, 10, or 11 digits to complete various types of calls. 

John Novack <jnovack@...>
 


John Nevius john.nevius@... [local-calling-guide] wrote:
I'm confused.  As I read the NANPA website, they say they do not provide local calling area information:

Here are some things you will NOT find on this site.

  • Zip codes - information on the correspondence between zip codes and area codes is available through various sources on the web. Find them by using a search engine.
  • Local calling areas - Local phone companies publish tariffs that contain calling rates and free calling areas. Look in the front of your phone directory or contact your phone company to see if they will provide this information to you. Several companies compile the information found in tariffs and sell local calling area databases.

My experience is that determining what is the expected local calling area is difficult and in general LCADS is not particularly accurate.  Where are you getting this detail?

Anymore, the "local calling area" varies widely by provider. ILEC providers mostly have the smallest. Clecs often have a wider calling area in an attempt to gain subscriber share. Many VOIP providers have nationwide service, and simply charge by the minute if at all. Some have unlimited, though have  "weasel clause" if they find "war dialing".
Many ILEC's are discontinuing directories as well.

John Novack




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