ADE-1 vs ADE-1+ and ADE-6


 

Hi All,

Couple of questions:

1. Does anyone know the difference between teh original ADE-1 and the ADE-1+ mixers? (0.5-500 MHz)

    I assume they are basically the same...but hey...what do I know...

2. Is there a demand for ADE-6 / ADE-6+ mixers ? (0.05-250 MHz) - I may stock them if there is a demand for VLF mixers.

TIA, Dis, W8DIZ


Jim, VE6JF
 

According to the MiniCircuits spec sheet, the +  Suffix identifies RoHS Compliance. I use lead solder so it probably
wouldn't mean much to me! :)
Jim, VE6JF


 

I love Lead...wish it was back in my gasoline...a lot better than just plain C2H5OH

-Diz

On 12/25/20 11:09 AM, Jim Leslie wrote:
According to the MiniCircuits spec sheet, the +  Suffix identifies RoHS Compliance. I use lead solder so it probably
wouldn't mean much to me! :)
Jim, VE6JF


Rick Bennett
 

I am with you on that.  I am glad the lead solder is still available for electronics.  But one of these days that will probably go away, need to get a lifetime supply of solder...

We have a couple old tractors at our farm that would be happy to burn leaded gas again (:

Rick, KC0PET

On 12/25/2020 11:08 AM, w8diz wrote:

I love Lead...wish it was back in my gasoline...a lot better than just plain C2H5OH

-Diz

On 12/25/20 11:09 AM, Jim Leslie wrote:
According to the MiniCircuits spec sheet, the +  Suffix identifies RoHS Compliance. I use lead solder so it probably
wouldn't mean much to me! :)
Jim, VE6JF


Walter Thomas/K3ASW
 

Might be considered "off topic" - and relevant to our "hobby" dablings.

Funny things happened on the way to removing lead from solders.

Removing lead from solders, as well as paints and other products, originated in the EU. There was political support in the US for removing lead in products by the EPA and governmental health agencies - the later mainly from kids gnawing on "lead" (graphite) pencils - remember those? -and window sills that had been painted with lead paints. The EU mandate goes under the RoHS moniker. (I think the term means "Removal of Hazardous Substances.") 

NASA, after experiencing numerous satellite failures confirmed to be caused by using solders with no lead, performed research that determined that just 4% lead in solders would prevent tin whisker formation that had caused those failures. Tin whisker growth had shorted relays used to switch redundant spacecraft electronics. A Swiss company produced several million digital watches assembled using lead-free solders and nearly 40% failed after a few months. Tin whisker formation and consequent component failures have occurred in aircraft, automobile, and military electronics. I've observed personally external tin whiskers on old metal can transistors that had been plated with pure tin; whiskers can also occur internally in hermetically-sealed TO transistor headers and "cans" tin-plated with no lead. The list goes on. (There is a NASA website that catalogues known failures reported to their experts.) These failures cost the space industry several billions of dollars in failed satellites; the Swiss watch company tens of millions in returned product; and unaccounted costs (dollars and lives) among other failed components and systems.

Another interesting anecdote: In visits to Tomas Jefferson's and James Madison's homesteads some years ago, it was noted that the wooden sidings that had been painted and maintained with lead-containing paints from back from the 1700's had no termite infestation. 

Interesting how a "bad" substance being eliminated whilst not fully understanding the underlying scientific and engineering implications of doing so can create unexpected losses (both in $semolians and lives). This is not to deny that certain substances can be hazardous, just that blanket bans without fully realising downstream impacts can be very costly.

Walt   K3ASW 


Rick Bennett
 

That is why we should never, ever allow children to chew on our PC boards 😁

Rick, KC0PET


On 12/26/2020 10:37 AM, Walter Thomas/K3ASW wrote:
Might be considered "off topic" - and relevant to our "hobby" dablings.

Funny things happened on the way to removing lead from solders.

Removing lead from solders, as well as paints and other products, originated in the EU. There was political support in the US for removing lead in products by the EPA and governmental health agencies - the later mainly from kids gnawing on "lead" (graphite) pencils - remember those? -and window sills that had been painted with lead paints. The EU mandate goes under the RoHS moniker. (I think the term means "Removal of Hazardous Substances.") 

NASA, after experiencing numerous satellite failures confirmed to be caused by using solders with no lead, performed research that determined that just 4% lead in solders would prevent tin whisker formation that had caused those failures. Tin whisker growth had shorted relays used to switch redundant spacecraft electronics. A Swiss company produced several million digital watches assembled using lead-free solders and nearly 40% failed after a few months. Tin whisker formation and consequent component failures have occurred in aircraft, automobile, and military electronics. I've observed personally external tin whiskers on old metal can transistors that had been plated with pure tin; whiskers can also occur internally in hermetically-sealed TO transistor headers and "cans" tin-plated with no lead. The list goes on. (There is a NASA website that catalogues known failures reported to their experts.) These failures cost the space industry several billions of dollars in failed satellites; the Swiss watch company tens of millions in returned product; and unaccounted costs (dollars and lives) among other failed components and systems.

Another interesting anecdote: In visits to Tomas Jefferson's and James Madison's homesteads some years ago, it was noted that the wooden sidings that had been painted and maintained with lead-containing paints from back from the 1700's had no termite infestation. 

Interesting how a "bad" substance being eliminated whilst not fully understanding the underlying scientific and engineering implications of doing so can create unexpected losses (both in $semolians and lives). This is not to deny that certain substances can be hazardous, just that blanket bans without fully realising downstream impacts can be very costly.

Walt   K3ASW 


ken WA2MZE
 

Interesting about the NASA data.  Well for them no issues, unless some alien is going to chew on their satellites.  Only RoHS issue is dumping electronics into land fills.  Most cities and towns in the US have hazardous disposal sites open at scheduled times during the year (around my neck of the woods once every few months) to accept BO electronics.

Leaded solder is still available, at least in the US (I just bought a spool of fine leaded solder recently from DIgikey).  The use of leaded solder is compatible with RoHS labeled parts (though it makes the product NON-RoHS).  Leaded solder melts at lower temperatures than leaded, though most soldering equipment can handle both, however your soldering tips might last longer with leaded (or not, this is more than just a temperature issue, and I don't know the chemistry).

As for ADE-1 vs ADE-6, I would never have thought of a part operating up to 250mhz as VLF :-).  However the ADE-6 is clearly for those building HF rigs that will operate up to the 6 meter band, and those building VHF-UHF  rigs will want the ADE-1.  So it would be nice to stock some of each.  However, H-Mode mixers seem to have better strong signal performance than doubly ballanced diode mixers.  The FSA-3157 (need two of them) circuit with three transformers and a 74HCT04 squarer seems to work rather well at HF.