Date   

Re: Should I do another batch of Slop Bucket kits? #poll

 

Jerry,

The Bitx40  has a drop dead simple 60 meter option that works great. For 49 bucks you cant beat it.

Joel N6ALT

On Jun 2, 2018, at 9:11 AM, ohwenzelph via Groups.Io <Ohwenzelph@...> wrote:

Consider 60 meters
i have nothing for 60
spozed to be good for nvis
Could be good for local portable disaster communication
maybe as an option for a 40 meter kit (or maybe a 75 meter one)
its mostly a kind of low power “band” already ( set of channels ?)
would need a good way to align it so every one could be sure the frequencies are spot on
it would be kind of a niche offering
and a relatively low cost way to “try out” 60 
i would buy at least one, two if you would let me
jerry aa1of


Re: Should I do another batch of Slop Bucket kits? #poll

ohwenzelph
 

Consider 60 meters
i have nothing for 60
spozed to be good for nvis
Could be good for local portable disaster communication
maybe as an option for a 40 meter kit (or maybe a 75 meter one)
its mostly a kind of low power “band” already ( set of channels ?)
would need a good way to align it so every one could be sure the frequencies are spot on
it would be kind of a niche offering
and a relatively low cost way to “try out” 60 
i would buy at least one, two if you would let me
jerry aa1of


Re: Slop bucket kits all sold.

ohwenzelph
 

Thanks!


On Jun 2, 2018, at 7:28 AM, Steven Weber <steve.kd1jv@...> wrote:

Subject line says it all. Thanks for all the interest in this rig.
73, Steve KD1JV 


Should I do another batch of Slop Bucket kits? #poll

Steven Weber
 

The Slop Bucket SSB rig wasn't an instant sell out like the CW rigs always were. So, I wonder if I doing another batch is worth the investment of time and money. 

I'm thinking maybe a 40M version this time? 

If I get close to 50 "yes, I'd definitely buy one", then I'll go ahead and start ordering parts. If not, well, guess we'll move on. 

73, Steve KD1JV 

Results

See Who Responded


Slop bucket kits all sold.

Steven Weber
 

Subject line says it all. Thanks for all the interest in this rig.
73, Steve KD1JV 


Re: Ten Slop Bucket kits left for sale!

Ion Petroianu
 

Hi Steve!
Can I have one shipped to Canada?
Let me know where to send $75.
I would prefer Paypal.
Thank you.
73
Ion
VA3NOI


Re: Ten Slop Bucket kits left for sale!

AE7AP
 

Steve:

I am interested in one if there are any left.

 

73,

Rob – AE7AP

 

From: kd1jvdesigns@groups.io <kd1jvdesigns@groups.io> On Behalf Of Steven Weber
Sent: Thursday, May 31, 2018 10:14 AM
To: kd1jvdesigns@groups.io
Subject: [kd1jvdesigns] Ten Slop Bucket kits left for sale!

 

Gang,

I have 10 Slop Bucket 20M SSB kits left and are looking for a good home. 
$60.00 post paid. (except DX, add $15.00)  
Anyone, anywhere - check or MO preferred, but PayPal will be okay too. 

73, Steve KD1JV 

 

Image removed by sender.

Virus-free. www.avg.com

 


Re: Ten Slop Bucket kits left for sale!

Jerry Brown
 

Please sign me up for one if available!
73
Jerry N4EO


On May 31, 2018, at 11:14 AM, Steven Weber <steve.kd1jv@...> wrote:

Gang,

I have 10 Slop Bucket 20M SSB kits left and are looking for a good home. 
$60.00 post paid. (except DX, add $15.00)  
Anyone, anywhere - check or MO preferred, but PayPal will be okay too. 

73, Steve KD1JV 


Ten Slop Bucket kits left for sale!

Steven Weber
 

Gang,

I have 10 Slop Bucket 20M SSB kits left and are looking for a good home. 
$60.00 post paid. (except DX, add $15.00)  
Anyone, anywhere - check or MO preferred, but PayPal will be okay too. 

73, Steve KD1JV 


Encloser for Slop Bucket

Steven Weber
 

Gang,

I just noticed that the 4SQRP club has a 4" x 4.5" x 1.5" box made of PCB material which the Slop Bucket board will fit into. 
Looks like a good option for those who haven't packaged their board yet or did a hack job of it. 


Re: Slop Bucket build missing parts

Clayton -ke7ngo
 

Hey Steve,  are you back from your walk about or are you still out having fun?  


Re: Slopbucket #006 Is Alive

Steven Weber
 

The speaker volume will likely go up significantly once it’s fully enclosed.

Steve KD1JV

 

 

I did not add any additional amplifier, the audio level from the speaker is low, but for now, I am OK with that. Chances are that most of the time I’ll be using a head set.

 

 


Re: Slopbucket #006 Is Alive

Karl Heinz Kremer - K5KHK
 

I did not add any additional amplifier, the audio level from the speaker is low, but for now, I am OK with that. Chances are that most of the time I’ll be using a head set.


Re: Slopbucket #006 Is Alive

Kelly Jack
 

Looks good Karl.

Did you need to add amplification for the speaker?

Regards



Simon VK3ELH 


Slopbucket #006 Is Alive

Karl Heinz Kremer - K5KHK
 

i finally finished the electrical work in my Slopbucket. The only thing remaining is some more mechanical work: it still needs a top and same labels for the jacks (and of course the top as well). I decided to add a small speaker. That required some surgery on the LEDs, and I had to move one of the electrolytic to the back of the board. 

Karl Heinz - K5KHK 


Re: My poor slopbucket

ajparent1/kb1gmx
 

I have one of the USB scopes very handy.  Lighting is also a tool as sometimes changing
the color makes things standout.

I've found an easy check is from the CPU (or other chip) to the trace.   Very handy for tracking
bad sockets used back in the late 70s early 80s.  The common problem was the pin and the
socket were touching but no contact!  Usually on new gear its soldering.

One thing that happens especially with the new no-lead solders is whiskers.  Very fine
strands of solder that cause bridges.  So fine (about a fraction of a hair) they can be
hard to see even under magnification.  Sometimes defluxing the board is enough to
sort it out.

Allison


Re: My poor slopbucket

Mike Olbrisch
 

There are also often good deals on USB micro-scopes.  They are available in various power levels, mine I think is 10/30/50 power.  Amazing what your solder connections look like at 50 power!  <grin>.

 

Vy73 -- Mike -- KD5KC.

 

 

 

From: kd1jvdesigns@groups.io [mailto:kd1jvdesigns@groups.io] On Behalf Of David Wilcox via Groups.Io
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2018 03:27
To: kd1jvdesigns@groups.io
Subject: Re: [kd1jvdesigns] My poor slopbucket

 

I recently built a Chinese crystal oscillator and it didn't work.  Even with 4 power head loup I couldn't see the problem.  I took pictures of the different sections of the board and enlarged them on my iPhone. Voila!  Saw a pin on the pic chip that wasn't soldered.  Fixed that and it worked.

 

So, add your iPhone or Android to your test gear.  I also used it to count the turns on a torroid I had wound for the QRPGuys Tri-band antenna.  I had been distracted and lost count.  Worked great!  Just had a thought..... Use my iPad...... Much larger screen and can enlarge the picture there many times.

 

FWIW

 

Dave K8WPE


On Apr 27, 2018, at 10:35 PM, Karl Heinz Kremer - K5KHK <khk@...> wrote:

Check the two test points at the Si5153 and make sure that you have the correct signals for BFO and LFO. I had one pin of the chip not soldered to the pad - it looked OK, but did not actually connect. That caused the LFO to not go anywhere. A quick tap with the hot soldering iron fixed that. 

Karl Heinz Kremer

PDF Acrobatics Without a Net 

PDF Software Development, Training and More... 


On Apr 27, 2018, at 10:29 PM, ohwenzelph via Groups.Io <Ohwenzelph@...> wrote:

U1       5.03v
U10     5.00v
U7       3.315v
R66     10.1ohms
Since redoing all the solder joints, the display does work and I can tune up and down and the mode switch can be used to turn cw on and off. Transmit LED only comes on if I “key” it. But the audio is a puttering and an occasional mouse squeak. Does not seem to receive and does not seem to transmit. 


Re: My poor slopbucket

David Wilcox
 

I recently built a Chinese crystal oscillator and it didn't work.  Even with 4 power head loup I couldn't see the problem.  I took pictures of the different sections of the board and enlarged them on my iPhone. Voila!  Saw a pin on the pic chip that wasn't soldered.  Fixed that and it worked.

So, add your iPhone or Android to your test gear.  I also used it to count the turns on a torroid I had wound for the QRPGuys Tri-band antenna.  I had been distracted and lost count.  Worked great!  Just had a thought..... Use my iPad...... Much larger screen and can enlarge the picture there many times.

FWIW

Dave K8WPE

On Apr 27, 2018, at 10:35 PM, Karl Heinz Kremer - K5KHK <khk@...> wrote:

Check the two test points at the Si5153 and make sure that you have the correct signals for BFO and LFO. I had one pin of the chip not soldered to the pad - it looked OK, but did not actually connect. That caused the LFO to not go anywhere. A quick tap with the hot soldering iron fixed that. 

Karl Heinz Kremer
PDF Acrobatics Without a Net 
PDF Software Development, Training and More... 

On Apr 27, 2018, at 10:29 PM, ohwenzelph via Groups.Io <Ohwenzelph@...> wrote:

U1       5.03v
U10     5.00v
U7       3.315v
R66     10.1ohms
Since redoing all the solder joints, the display does work and I can tune up and down and the mode switch can be used to turn cw on and off. Transmit LED only comes on if I “key” it. But the audio is a puttering and an occasional mouse squeak. Does not seem to receive and does not seem to transmit. 


Re: Solder Paste Temp for KD1JV Rigs

Shirley Dulcey KE1L
 

There are three types of solder paste that are readily available.
Sn63/Pb37 is the traditional tin/lead solder with a melting point of
183C/361F. The most popular lead-free solder paste is the
tin/silver/copper alloy SAC305 (Sn96.5/Ag3.0/Cu0.5) with a melting
point of 217C/423F. The low temperature solder with bismuth is
Bi57/Sn42/Ag1.0 with a melting point of 140C/284F, or
Bi57.6/Sn42/Ag0.4 with a melting point of 138C/281F. There is also a
tin/bismuth alloy with no silver, Bi58/Sn42, which has a slightly
lower melting point, but it is brittle so the alloys with silver are
preferred for most applications.

SAC305 requires careful use because of the high melting point. It's
near the temperature where some components will be damaged so good
control of temperature is important. It's probably best to use this
only with a temperature controlled rework station rather than a cheap
embossing gun. Most current electronic products are soldered with
SAC305, or other similar alloys such as the cost cutting SAC105 (less
silver), and they are soldered in a reflow oven with close control of
temperature. The reflow oven will first bring the board to a "soaking"
temperature for a while until it reaches thermal equilibrium, then
bring it to the melting temperature for a short time, and finally a
slow cool-down to minimize thermal stresses on the board. Some hams
have modified toaster ovens to produce the preferred heating profile
for reflow soldering.

I have had good results with the bismuth alloy. I wouldn't use it to
solder QRO power transistors, which might conceivably get hot enough
to melt the solder, or in the vicinity of vacuum tubes. DO NOT USE
bismuth solder for components with leads (leeds) or SMD pads with lead
(led) or on circuit boards with a tinned finish that contains lead;
introducing lead lowers the melting point considerably, possibly well
under 100C depending on how much lead is present. If you're working
with those older components or with cheap PCBs from China with
lead-containing finishes, stick with 63/37. SAC305 will also work, but
keep in mind that you're being exposed to lead from the components and
act accordingly. (Adding lead to SAC305 lowers the melting point but
not to a dangerous level.)

Sn60/Pb40 was the standard soldering product for a long time but it
eventually got displaced by the eutectic 63/37 alloy. (Eutectic means
that there is no pasty phase between solid and liquid; it goes
directly from one state to the other. It's easier to get clean
soldering joints with a eutectic alloy.) I've never seen 60/40 solder
paste. 63/37 is an excellent choice if you choose to work with a
soldering product with lead. If you still have spools of 60/40 go
ahead and use them up; you'll just have to be more careful to avoid
the problems that can arise because of joint movement while the
temperature of the solder is in the paste phase.

I prefer not to work with leaded solder because of the potential
health issues, though I know it's not unsafe if handled properly. Many
hams choose to use solder with lead because of its proven reliability,
lower cost, and ease of work. If you do work with lead, make sure to
clean your hands before eating! It's always a good idea after doing
any electronic work, but doubly important if you have been handling
lead.

On Thu, Apr 26, 2018 at 10:37 AM, ajparent1/kb1gmx <kb1gmx@...> wrote:
If it gets hot enough to melt the low temp you have issues... 137C is 278F,
that's hot!
I used the nominal lead material Kester-44 63/37. I have that in .015,
.030, .040 diameters
as its just handy.

Seriously the only place where there is any heating of significance is the
final transistor.

That said I really hate the non-led solders they do not make good looking
joints. I soldered my
si5351 down using Kester-44 63/37 in .015 diameter. It was the flood (aka
don't sweat bridges)
then clean(flux impregnated silver braid from RG316) up technique. HINT:
RG316 teflon coax
has a very good silver plated braid and having lots of small pieces I strip
it flatten the briad
and use a drop of rosin flux as a substitute for Solderwik. Because of the
silver plating
it wicks solder vigorously.

The crystal I pre-tinned the pads and added a tiny bit of flus then used my
hot air tool.

The rest of the stuff was fine tip and the kester solder by hand, been doing
SMT for years
and a good set of tweezers and what I call a spare finger (spring loaded
hold down)
makes for easy assembly. Periodically cleaning flux from the tweezers makes
it easier
place parts as they can get flux on them and become sticky. I also Degauss
mine as
some of the small parts are magnetic, that removes that form of cling too.
I put the
board in a PANA-Vise, and position and solder everything on one side then
flip it.
The biggest thing is organizing all the parts and I use a plastic tray
(about 6x12 inches)
with large shallow compartments for keeping them under control and sorted as
to what
component group is being used at a given time.

Oh, and never ever sneeze! ;-)

Allison


Re: My poor slopbucket

ohwenzelph
 

Ah..
when in doubt, read the instructions!
I was trying to set the bias in CW mode, this was incorrect. That was why it was chewing up all the miliamps that I threw at it. Things so far look good now. Conclusion:

Originally something was not soldered right,

not sure what, may have been those tiny leads or the crystal or something to the big programmed Mega chip or display or could have been a couple of places. Everything did look really good, had used solder paste for the surface mount parts but avoided over cooking, so the joints looked just a little bit dull. Those tiny leads looked perfect but I have been fooled before. So now there is an abundance of solder (and flux), all the joints shine, and now everything has been thouroughly cooked and recooked. 

Quoting Steve: “Problems?
If something doesn't work, you can be sure it's due to soldering. It always is.“ (Did have a wrong part/in the wrong spot..)