Date   

Re: Lenovo laptops on win 10 does your sound randomly go out?

Sherry Wells
 

It happens to me too.  The sound has always come back if I just keep arrowing around.  I’m not sure what would happen if I walked away for a few minutes; will have to try that next time.  I have so far never had to reboot to get the sound back.

 

Sherry Wells

“Let’s make stupid embarrassing again”

Rex W. Huppke

 

 

From: jfw-users@groups.io <jfw-users@groups.io> On Behalf Of LaTour, Mark
Sent: Sunday, June 12, 2022 8:39 AM
To: jfw-users@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jfw-users] Lenovo laptops on win 10 does your sound randomly go out?

 

It happens to me from time to time, but rarely. I simply restart the laptop to get JAWS to start working again. I’m not sure if it’s a Lenovo/JAWS  problem but I recall a couple of others on this list who’ve had the same problem.

 

 

 

From: jfw-users@groups.io [mailto:jfw-users@groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis L
Sent: Sunday, June 12, 2022 4:40 AM
To: jfw-users@groups.io
Subject: [jfw-users] Lenovo laptops on win 10 does your sound randomly go out?

 

Is anyone else experiencing this? Is there a way to fix it?


Re: Lenovo laptops on win 10 does your sound randomly go out?

Mike B
 


Dennis,
 
What soundcard are you running?

----- Original Message -----
From: Dennis L
Sent: Sunday, June 12, 2022 2:39 AM
Subject: [jfw-users] Lenovo laptops on win 10 does your sound randomly go out?

Is anyone else experiencing this? Is there a way to fix it?


Re: New Subscriber Contemplating Switching from NVDA to JAWS with A Few Questions

Lino Morales <linomorales001@...>
 

NVDA is equal IMHO in some ways far better than JAWS when it comes with Braille. With JAWS you don't have to worry abouthe extra dots for indicators etc. With NVDA you get 100 percent pure Braille like your reading lines on a hardcopy paper. Just my thoughts.

On 6/11/2022 12:48 AM, Lanie Molinar wrote:

Hi all. I've been playing with JAWS 2022 for a little while now. I'm a
long-time user of NVDA and like it, but I'm interested in some of the
features JAWS
provides that NVDA doesn't, and I'd like to start using Braille more
since I love Braille and am autistic and sometimes have periods of
sensory overload
with all my screen readers going off around me and other noises in my
environment. I know JAWS provides better Braille support, and I'm hoping
to get a
Braille display soon. I have a few questions though. Are there any
resources for finding scripts? I'm used to looking for add-ons in one
location, like
the NVDA add-ons website. Also, is there a way to make JAWS speak
passwords? With NVDA, I have an add-on that does this. Does anyone know
of any training
resources for people who already know how to use a computer, advanced
computer users, or people who have used other screen readers? I looked
at the basic
training materials, but they seemed a little basic for my needs.
Finally, is there anyone who has made this switch and might be able to
give me some tips on switching? Thanks.


Re: Lenovo laptops on win 10 does your sound randomly go out?

LaTour, Mark
 

It happens to me from time to time, but rarely. I simply restart the laptop to get JAWS to start working again. I’m not sure if it’s a Lenovo/JAWS  problem but I recall a couple of others on this list who’ve had the same problem.

 

 

 

From: jfw-users@groups.io [mailto:jfw-users@groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis L
Sent: Sunday, June 12, 2022 4:40 AM
To: jfw-users@groups.io
Subject: [jfw-users] Lenovo laptops on win 10 does your sound randomly go out?

 

Is anyone else experiencing this? Is there a way to fix it?


Lenovo laptops on win 10 does your sound randomly go out?

Dennis L
 

Is anyone else experiencing this? Is there a way to fix it?


Re: Word Processors that Work with JAWS

Chris J LaRue NO7E
 

You can use MS Office free online without a subscription.  The online only version is free and of course does not have all the bells and whistles that the premium version does, but it is fully functional.  www.office.com

 

-- 
73 de Chris NO7E
ARRL Public Information Officer
Nevada Section
no7e@...
702-292-0880


Editing a JPEG document

David Diamond
 

I probably got things wrong.  When my sister scanned a document, it came out as a JPG image.  The OCR on JAWS was able to read it, however, it needed to be edited.  How can I edit it? I have Adobe DC however, that does not afford me the ability to update/edit  it.   


Re: New Subscriber Contemplating Switching from NVDA to JAWS with A Few Questions

Cristóbal
 

For me and what always brings me back to Jaws whenever I try using NVDA for a longer period of time is the fact that NVDA doesn’t really have a full complement of laptop keyboard navigation commands. Yes, I know you can use the four arrow keys and the insert+L command for say current line, but at least in my workflow, I find it more comfortable and efficient to be able to have all the options provided to me by Jaws (navigate by character, word, line sentence, paragraph) on the keyboard with the caps lock key acting as the insert key and not having to bother with switching back and forth with the arrow keys.

It may seem like a small thing, but when you’re dealing with emails all day, stuff like that quickly stands out.

One thing I will say though is that it’s cool that NVDA offers contracted Spanish Braille whereas Jaws doesn’t. It’s really hard to find any resources in Spanish grade 2. Here in the States. I’ll load NVDA for this purpose and read Spanish language eBooks on my Braille display just to keep up my Spanish Braille.

 

From: jfw-users@groups.io <jfw-users@groups.io> On Behalf Of David Goldfield
Sent: Saturday, June 11, 2022 7:49 AM
To: jfw-users@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jfw-users] New Subscriber Contemplating Switching from NVDA to JAWS with A Few Questions

 

Hi. I’ve been using JAWS for Windows since version 1.0 began shipping in 1995 as well as NVDA since the summer of 2009 so I think that I can speak about both the similarities as well as the differences between the two screen readers.

Regarding sources for scripts another excellent resource is Hartgen Consultancy. Unlike Doug Lee’s Web site which Richard mentioned in his message the majority of Brian Hartgen’s scripts are not free of cost but they are well worth it. I am quite a fan of Leasey, which adds a lot of additional and extremely useful functionality to JAWS.

The JAWS-users.com Scripts page has a collection of free scripts which can be downloaded.

The Snowman also offers some scripts.

Unfortunately, we really don’t have a single script repository which is maintained by the community the way that NVDA does and, as Richard very correctly said, Freedom Scientific doesn’t maintain one. During the early days of JAWS when scripts were referred to as macros they did offer a small collection of JAWS macros but this went away probably around the time version 3.0 was released. This is, in my opinion, a missed opportunity. It would be the equivalent of Amazon selling Kindles but telling people that they need to find their own books from Joe’s Kindle Books page and other third-party Web sites. The only way to work around this is for the community to come together and organize their own repository of JAWS scripts.

I don’t know if a script exists to allow JAWS to speak passwords as they are entered.

 

Regarding training if you open the Help menu from the JAWS window and then open the Web Resources submenu you’ll find an option called Surfing The Internet which offers interactive training covering how to use JAWS on the Web. There are also links in the Web Resources menu to online training resources and recordings of webinars. While Freedom Scientific lacks resources for scripts they are certainly not lacking when it comes to the amount of training sessions they have offered, many of which go beyond the basics. They also have a Youtube channel offering shorter lessons covering a variety of computer applications.

Also, the American Council of the Blind’s ACB Community podcast offers a large collection of webinars conducted by Freedom Scientific with many of them doing a deep dive into specific JAWS features. Look for “ACB Community” wherever you get your podcasts and you’ll likely find it. Not all of the podcast episodes are from FS but there’s a nice assortment of them contained in that list.

Brian Hartgen of Hartgen Consultancy, who I mentioned earlier, also sells recordings of previously conducted training classes covering the use of JAWS and a variety of applications. His Microsoft Word tutorial is several years old and so parts of it are a bit outdated but it along with the other tutorials he offers is excellent and he is one of the finest trainers out there.

Finally, Cathy Anne Murtha’s Access Technology Institute sells a variety of training textbooks covering the use of JAWS with several applications.

Hope that helps.

 

 

 

David Goldfield,

Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist

NVDA Certified Expert

 

Subscribe to the Tech-VI announcement list to receive news, events and information regarding the blindness assistive technology field.

Email: tech-vi+subscribe@groups.io

www.DavidGoldfield.org

 

From: jfw-users@groups.io <jfw-users@groups.io> On Behalf Of Richard Turner
Sent: Saturday, June 11, 2022 10:07 AM
To: jfw-users@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jfw-users] New Subscriber Contemplating Switching from NVDA to JAWS with A Few Questions

 

I will try to help with part of your questions.

 

One resource for Jaws scripts is a site by Doug Lee: https://dlee.org

I tis best to always read the specific entry about the script before installing it.

 

I’m sure others have other sources for scripts, but as far as I know, Freedom Scientific doesn’t maintain a site of available scripts.

 

I cannot address whether Jaws has better braille support at this stage since NVDA recently added the HID Braille protocol.

 

I was never a solid NVDA user but the fact that many of the keystrokes are similar and most all are user defineable, that should help in the transition.

 

I’m not sure of any good training sites.  I learned it from asking questions on this list and getting some basic training from my colleagues when I was working at a rehab center teaching braille and adaptive devices and had to use Jaws for all the documentation, client database, etc.

 

All I can say, is Jaws is massively complex; and sometimes I wonder if all the complexity is necessary.

 

Good luck,

 

 

 

Richard

 

My web site; https://www.turner42.com/

 

From: jfw-users@groups.io <jfw-users@groups.io> On Behalf Of Lanie Molinar
Sent: Friday, June 10, 2022 9:49 PM
To: JFW-Users@groups.io
Subject: [jfw-users] New Subscriber Contemplating Switching from NVDA to JAWS with A Few Questions

 

Hi all. I've been playing with JAWS 2022 for a little while now. I'm a
long-time user of NVDA and like it, but I'm interested in some of the
features JAWS
provides that NVDA doesn't, and I'd like to start using Braille more
since I love Braille and am autistic and sometimes have periods of
sensory overload
with all my screen readers going off around me and other noises in my
environment. I know JAWS provides better Braille support, and I'm hoping
to get a
Braille display soon. I have a few questions though. Are there any
resources for finding scripts? I'm used to looking for add-ons in one
location, like
the NVDA add-ons website. Also, is there a way to make JAWS speak
passwords? With NVDA, I have an add-on that does this. Does anyone know
of any training
resources for people who already know how to use a computer, advanced
computer users, or people who have used other screen readers? I looked
at the basic
training materials, but they seemed a little basic for my needs.
Finally, is there anyone who has made this switch and might be able to
give me some tips on switching? Thanks.


Re: Word Processors that Work with JAWS

Andy
 


There is also the Jarte word processor, and I believe it is still free.
 
Andy
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, June 11, 2022 12:33 PM
Subject: Re: [jfw-users] Word Processors that Work with JAWS

I'm pretty low-income, so I'm trying to be careful about all of these subscriptions. JAWS is a little expensive for me even with the annual license but I really thought it might help me, so I'm going for it. I played with Libre for a few minutes and it does seem to work.

On 6/11/2022 12:51 PM, Richard Turner wrote:
You could do an individual subscription for one computer for Microsoft 365 for about $70 per year, which keeps you updated and you can download any or all of the office programs.
Have you tried your Libre with Jaws? I never bothered with any of the open source projects because I have Microsoft 365.
If you decide to do that, only buy it through Microsoft to avoid any of the questionable licenses often being advertised.
Also, if you don't already have their number, Microsoft Accessibility can be a good help at times with using screen readers and their software, 800-936-5900

HTH,





Richard
“What we think or what we know or what we believe is in the end of little consequence. The only thing of consequence is what we do” ~ John Ruskin


On Jun 11, 2022, at 10:39 AM, Lanie Molinar <laniebird91@...> wrote:

Hi all. Thanks to everyone who answered my last email. You all gave me
some great resources to check out, and I found some useful scripts. I
also purchased Leasey and downloaded  the Windows Screen Reader Primer.
I'll be reading that next. I have another question. I might have a lot
for a little while. I know Microsoft Word works well with JAWS, but I
can't really justify the expense, especially since I don't do a lot of
work with documents. I might need to in the future, though. What are
some other word processors that work well with JAWS? With NVDA, I used
Google Docs or occasionally LibreOffice. Are these good, or are there
others you would recommend? I want to find one for future work, but I'm
also just looking for a good way to read the Windows Screen Reader
Primer, which comes in Microsoft Word format. Thanks.


Re: Word Processors that Work with JAWS

 

I'm pretty low-income, so I'm trying to be careful about all of these subscriptions. JAWS is a little expensive for me even with the annual license but I really thought it might help me, so I'm going for it. I played with Libre for a few minutes and it does seem to work.

On 6/11/2022 12:51 PM, Richard Turner wrote:

You could do an individual subscription for one computer for Microsoft 365 for about $70 per year, which keeps you updated and you can download any or all of the office programs.
Have you tried your Libre with Jaws? I never bothered with any of the open source projects because I have Microsoft 365.
If you decide to do that, only buy it through Microsoft to avoid any of the questionable licenses often being advertised.
Also, if you don't already have their number, Microsoft Accessibility can be a good help at times with using screen readers and their software, 800-936-5900

HTH,





Richard
“What we think or what we know or what we believe is in the end of little consequence. The only thing of consequence is what we do” ~ John Ruskin


On Jun 11, 2022, at 10:39 AM, Lanie Molinar <laniebird91@...> wrote:

Hi all. Thanks to everyone who answered my last email. You all gave me
some great resources to check out, and I found some useful scripts. I
also purchased Leasey and downloaded  the Windows Screen Reader Primer.
I'll be reading that next. I have another question. I might have a lot
for a little while. I know Microsoft Word works well with JAWS, but I
can't really justify the expense, especially since I don't do a lot of
work with documents. I might need to in the future, though. What are
some other word processors that work well with JAWS? With NVDA, I used
Google Docs or occasionally LibreOffice. Are these good, or are there
others you would recommend? I want to find one for future work, but I'm
also just looking for a good way to read the Windows Screen Reader
Primer, which comes in Microsoft Word format. Thanks.


Re: Word Processors that Work with JAWS

Richard Turner
 

You could do an individual subscription for one computer for Microsoft 365 for about $70 per year, which keeps you updated and you can download any or all of the office programs.
Have you tried your Libre with Jaws? I never bothered with any of the open source projects because I have Microsoft 365.
If you decide to do that, only buy it through Microsoft to avoid any of the questionable licenses often being advertised.
Also, if you don't already have their number, Microsoft Accessibility can be a good help at times with using screen readers and their software, 800-936-5900

HTH,





Richard
“What we think or what we know or what we believe is in the end of little consequence. The only thing of consequence is what we do” ~ John Ruskin
My web site: https://www.turner42.com


On Jun 11, 2022, at 10:39 AM, Lanie Molinar <laniebird91@...> wrote:

Hi all. Thanks to everyone who answered my last email. You all gave me
some great resources to check out, and I found some useful scripts. I
also purchased Leasey and downloaded  the Windows Screen Reader Primer.
I'll be reading that next. I have another question. I might have a lot
for a little while. I know Microsoft Word works well with JAWS, but I
can't really justify the expense, especially since I don't do a lot of
work with documents. I might need to in the future, though. What are
some other word processors that work well with JAWS? With NVDA, I used
Google Docs or occasionally LibreOffice. Are these good, or are there
others you would recommend? I want to find one for future work, but I'm
also just looking for a good way to read the Windows Screen Reader
Primer, which comes in Microsoft Word format. Thanks.


Re: Word Processors that Work with JAWS

K0LNY
 


Here's more info on Libre Office:
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into the software, and it has been used in its various incarnations by millions. Today, LibreOffice is by far the most active continuation of the OpenOffice.org
codebase, with releases every six months and hundreds of contributors. Also, LibreOffice uses libraries from the
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----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, June 11, 2022 12:45 PM
Subject: Re: [jfw-users] Word Processors that Work with JAWS

There is the open source Libre Office, which is a suite of tools like Microsoft Office and that does Word files well and it's free.
Here's a link:
Glenn
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, June 11, 2022 12:37 PM
Subject: [jfw-users] Word Processors that Work with JAWS

Hi all. Thanks to everyone who answered my last email. You all gave me
some great resources to check out, and I found some useful scripts. I
also purchased Leasey and downloaded  the Windows Screen Reader Primer.
I'll be reading that next. I have another question. I might have a lot
for a little while. I know Microsoft Word works well with JAWS, but I
can't really justify the expense, especially since I don't do a lot of
work with documents. I might need to in the future, though. What are
some other word processors that work well with JAWS? With NVDA, I used
Google Docs or occasionally LibreOffice. Are these good, or are there
others you would recommend? I want to find one for future work, but I'm
also just looking for a good way to read the Windows Screen Reader
Primer, which comes in Microsoft Word format. Thanks.


Re: Word Processors that Work with JAWS

K0LNY
 


There is the open source Libre Office, which is a suite of tools like Microsoft Office and that does Word files well and it's free.
Here's a link:
Glenn
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, June 11, 2022 12:37 PM
Subject: [jfw-users] Word Processors that Work with JAWS

Hi all. Thanks to everyone who answered my last email. You all gave me
some great resources to check out, and I found some useful scripts. I
also purchased Leasey and downloaded  the Windows Screen Reader Primer.
I'll be reading that next. I have another question. I might have a lot
for a little while. I know Microsoft Word works well with JAWS, but I
can't really justify the expense, especially since I don't do a lot of
work with documents. I might need to in the future, though. What are
some other word processors that work well with JAWS? With NVDA, I used
Google Docs or occasionally LibreOffice. Are these good, or are there
others you would recommend? I want to find one for future work, but I'm
also just looking for a good way to read the Windows Screen Reader
Primer, which comes in Microsoft Word format. Thanks.


Re: Word Processors that Work with JAWS

 

I don't think NotePad does word processing, just plain text. As for WordPad, I don't know much about it. I might give it a try.

On 6/11/2022 12:42 PM, Madison Martin wrote:

You could try Notepad or Wordpad; I use Microsoft Word but I’ve used those from time to time

 

From: jfw-users@groups.io <jfw-users@groups.io> On Behalf Of Lanie Molinar
Sent: June 11, 2022 12:38 PM
To: JFW-Users@groups.io
Subject: [jfw-users] Word Processors that Work with JAWS

 

Hi all. Thanks to everyone who answered my last email. You all gave me
some great resources to check out, and I found some useful scripts. I
also purchased Leasey and downloaded  the Windows Screen Reader Primer.
I'll be reading that next. I have another question. I might have a lot
for a little while. I know Microsoft Word works well with JAWS, but I
can't really justify the expense, especially since I don't do a lot of
work with documents. I might need to in the future, though. What are
some other word processors that work well with JAWS? With NVDA, I used
Google Docs or occasionally LibreOffice. Are these good, or are there
others you would recommend? I want to find one for future work, but I'm
also just looking for a good way to read the Windows Screen Reader
Primer, which comes in Microsoft Word format. Thanks.


Re: Word Processors that Work with JAWS

Madison Martin
 

You could try Notepad or Wordpad; I use Microsoft Word but I’ve used those from time to time

 

From: jfw-users@groups.io <jfw-users@groups.io> On Behalf Of Lanie Molinar
Sent: June 11, 2022 12:38 PM
To: JFW-Users@groups.io
Subject: [jfw-users] Word Processors that Work with JAWS

 

Hi all. Thanks to everyone who answered my last email. You all gave me
some great resources to check out, and I found some useful scripts. I
also purchased Leasey and downloaded  the Windows Screen Reader Primer.
I'll be reading that next. I have another question. I might have a lot
for a little while. I know Microsoft Word works well with JAWS, but I
can't really justify the expense, especially since I don't do a lot of
work with documents. I might need to in the future, though. What are
some other word processors that work well with JAWS? With NVDA, I used
Google Docs or occasionally LibreOffice. Are these good, or are there
others you would recommend? I want to find one for future work, but I'm
also just looking for a good way to read the Windows Screen Reader
Primer, which comes in Microsoft Word format. Thanks.


Word Processors that Work with JAWS

 

Hi all. Thanks to everyone who answered my last email. You all gave me
some great resources to check out, and I found some useful scripts. I
also purchased Leasey and downloaded  the Windows Screen Reader Primer.
I'll be reading that next. I have another question. I might have a lot
for a little while. I know Microsoft Word works well with JAWS, but I
can't really justify the expense, especially since I don't do a lot of
work with documents. I might need to in the future, though. What are
some other word processors that work well with JAWS? With NVDA, I used
Google Docs or occasionally LibreOffice. Are these good, or are there
others you would recommend? I want to find one for future work, but I'm
also just looking for a good way to read the Windows Screen Reader
Primer, which comes in Microsoft Word format. Thanks.


Re: New Subscriber Contemplating Switching from NVDA to JAWS with A Few Questions

Orlando Enrique Fiol
 

Hi, Lanie.

>I've been playing with JAWS 2022 for a little while now. I'm a
>long-time user of NVDA and like it, but I'm interested in some of the
>features JAWS
>provides that NVDA doesn't, and I'd like to start using Braille more
>since I love Braille and am autistic and sometimes have periods of
>sensory overload
>with all my screen readers going off around me and other noises in my
>environment. I know JAWS provides better Braille support, and I'm hoping
>to get a
>Braille display soon.

I don't use JAWS with a Braille display because I don't own one, but
I can speak to its other features, since I took to JAWS, kicking and
screaming from Windows-eyes after my beloved screen reader was un
ceremonially massacred by then VFOGroup.
To me, JAWS' most powerful features include voice aliases,
speech&sound schemes and easily loaded voice profiles. With
speech&sound schemes, you can assign specific voices or sounds to
control types and states. If you wanted, for instance, you could have
checked and unchecked sounds, so that when you tab past rows of check
boxes, you wouldn't have to await the reeding of each box's state.
You can assign specific sounds and voices to color attributes or
fonts, for easy proofreading. You can even customize the strings JAWS
speaks for each control or attribute it reports. Some folks identify
check boxes as tick boxes, with their states as being ticked and un
ticked. In a speech&sound scheme, they could have JAWS report check
boxes as tick boxes and checked/unchecked as ticked/un ticked.

>I have a few questions though. Are there any
>resources for finding scripts? I'm used to looking for add-ons in one
>location, like
>the NVDA add-ons website.

I've never encountered such a resource. Most JAWS script writers have
websites listing their scripts and providing download links, but
Vispero doesn't seem to oversee a scripts repository, since all
scripts it produces come packaged with JAWS anyway.

>Also, is there a way to make JAWS speak
>passwords? With NVDA, I have an add-on that does this.

This is unfortunately still impossible, much to the consternation of
those of us who don't want to hear our passwords spoken as stars. If
an application/website doesn't have a password-showing option,
there's just no way to hear it spoken except by turning on keyboard
character and word echo, so you can at least hear as you type.

>Does anyone know of any training
>resources for people who already know how to use a computer, advanced
>computer users, or people who have used other screen readers? I looked
>at the basic training materials, but they seemed a little basic for
my needs.

That's also my frustration.Truth is, advanced users don't need the
same kinds of training materials as basic users, since we need much
less explanation than they do. So, it's often enough to consult
references for, say, hotkeys, commands or configuration settings,
since it's assumed that we'd knnow how to implement them.

>Finally, is there anyone who has made this switch and might be able to
>give me some tips on switching? Thanks.

I switched from Window-eyes, but have never been much of an NVDAa
user, since it seems almost equivalent to Narrator in terms of
functionality (or lack thereof).
When II began using NVDa, I learned, to my horror, that Ii couldn't
customize the order in which control types and states are read. this
is, to me, a basic screen reader capability. so, upon asking on the
NVDA list about this, I was told that its coders hadn't bothered
dealing with this. That and other things put me off using NVDA as my
primary screen reader. I couldn't return to system-wide voice
profiles after having different voices load with Window-eyes setfiles
or specific applications in JAWS.
I also think NVDA's screen/cursor review interface is awkward and
clunky. With the touch and JAWS cursors, I just invoke their hotkeys
and they're active; I don't have to toggle or cycle through menus to
determine whether there are objects in the window, then expand each
object to see if there are others nested within it. This information
should be revealed through navigation. You shouldn't need the extra
step of choosing the cursor review mode, then navigating within it.
For that reason, Ii find NVDA's mouse echo superior any JAWS or
Narrator equivalent. With its directional tones within the stereo
field, I can immediately tell when the mouse is moving left or right.
Up and down are represented by pitch changes, which is cleverly efficient.
I'm glad to compare notes and share any resources I have with you.
Good luck, and keep in touch,
Orlando

Orlando Enrique Fiol
Charlotte, North Carolina
Professional Pianist/Keyboardist, Percussionist and Pedagogue
Ph.D. in Music theory
University of Pennsylvania: November, 2018
Home: (980) 236-8685
Mobile: (267) 971-7090


Re: Chrome question

 

Well, from what I've found it's a feature of Chrome that allows automatic switching to legacy browsers, typically Internet Explorer, for a specific list of URLs, and where if you navigate back from that URL you can be set up to automatically go back to Chrome.

This appears to be something more typically used in large enterprise settings.  They even mention the complete removal of IE this year and that the feature can now trigger Edge in IE Mode.

If you're not being "thrown out" of Chrome when that message appears then I would presume the instance of Chrome you're using is not completely configured for Chrome Legacy, which would be unsurprising for home users.  The funny thing is that Chrome's own documentation says this is enabled after a certain Chrome version that I've now forgotten, but without a list of URLs on which to apply it there really is no effect.

I've never encountered this, but I also use Google Chrome browser very sparingly these days, preferring other Chromium-based browsers.
--

Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

A man's worst difficulties begin when he is able to do as he likes.

       ~ Thomas H. Huxley (1876)


Re: New Subscriber Contemplating Switching from NVDA to JAWS with A Few Questions

LaTour, Mark
 

Wow, what an impressive resource! You are definitely what I would call a true expert. It is an honor to be part of this list with people such as yourself on it.

 

Thanks for sharing the info…

 

 

From: jfw-users@groups.io [mailto:jfw-users@groups.io] On Behalf Of David Goldfield
Sent: Saturday, June 11, 2022 9:49 AM
To: jfw-users@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jfw-users] New Subscriber Contemplating Switching from NVDA to JAWS with A Few Questions

 

Hi. I’ve been using JAWS for Windows since version 1.0 began shipping in 1995 as well as NVDA since the summer of 2009 so I think that I can speak about both the similarities as well as the differences between the two screen readers.

Regarding sources for scripts another excellent resource is Hartgen Consultancy. Unlike Doug Lee’s Web site which Richard mentioned in his message the majority of Brian Hartgen’s scripts are not free of cost but they are well worth it. I am quite a fan of Leasey, which adds a lot of additional and extremely useful functionality to JAWS.

The JAWS-users.com Scripts page has a collection of free scripts which can be downloaded.

The Snowman also offers some scripts.

Unfortunately, we really don’t have a single script repository which is maintained by the community the way that NVDA does and, as Richard very correctly said, Freedom Scientific doesn’t maintain one. During the early days of JAWS when scripts were referred to as macros they did offer a small collection of JAWS macros but this went away probably around the time version 3.0 was released. This is, in my opinion, a missed opportunity. It would be the equivalent of Amazon selling Kindles but telling people that they need to find their own books from Joe’s Kindle Books page and other third-party Web sites. The only way to work around this is for the community to come together and organize their own repository of JAWS scripts.

I don’t know if a script exists to allow JAWS to speak passwords as they are entered.

 

Regarding training if you open the Help menu from the JAWS window and then open the Web Resources submenu you’ll find an option called Surfing The Internet which offers interactive training covering how to use JAWS on the Web. There are also links in the Web Resources menu to online training resources and recordings of webinars. While Freedom Scientific lacks resources for scripts they are certainly not lacking when it comes to the amount of training sessions they have offered, many of which go beyond the basics. They also have a Youtube channel offering shorter lessons covering a variety of computer applications.

Also, the American Council of the Blind’s ACB Community podcast offers a large collection of webinars conducted by Freedom Scientific with many of them doing a deep dive into specific JAWS features. Look for “ACB Community” wherever you get your podcasts and you’ll likely find it. Not all of the podcast episodes are from FS but there’s a nice assortment of them contained in that list.

Brian Hartgen of Hartgen Consultancy, who I mentioned earlier, also sells recordings of previously conducted training classes covering the use of JAWS and a variety of applications. His Microsoft Word tutorial is several years old and so parts of it are a bit outdated but it along with the other tutorials he offers is excellent and he is one of the finest trainers out there.

Finally, Cathy Anne Murtha’s Access Technology Institute sells a variety of training textbooks covering the use of JAWS with several applications.

Hope that helps.

 

 

 

David Goldfield,

Blindness Assistive Technology Specialist

NVDA Certified Expert

 

Subscribe to the Tech-VI announcement list to receive news, events and information regarding the blindness assistive technology field.

Email: tech-vi+subscribe@groups.io

www.DavidGoldfield.org

 

From: jfw-users@groups.io <jfw-users@groups.io> On Behalf Of Richard Turner
Sent: Saturday, June 11, 2022 10:07 AM
To: jfw-users@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jfw-users] New Subscriber Contemplating Switching from NVDA to JAWS with A Few Questions

 

I will try to help with part of your questions.

 

One resource for Jaws scripts is a site by Doug Lee: https://dlee.org

I tis best to always read the specific entry about the script before installing it.

 

I’m sure others have other sources for scripts, but as far as I know, Freedom Scientific doesn’t maintain a site of available scripts.

 

I cannot address whether Jaws has better braille support at this stage since NVDA recently added the HID Braille protocol.

 

I was never a solid NVDA user but the fact that many of the keystrokes are similar and most all are user defineable, that should help in the transition.

 

I’m not sure of any good training sites.  I learned it from asking questions on this list and getting some basic training from my colleagues when I was working at a rehab center teaching braille and adaptive devices and had to use Jaws for all the documentation, client database, etc.

 

All I can say, is Jaws is massively complex; and sometimes I wonder if all the complexity is necessary.

 

Good luck,

 

 

 

Richard

 

My web site; https://www.turner42.com/

 

From: jfw-users@groups.io <jfw-users@groups.io> On Behalf Of Lanie Molinar
Sent: Friday, June 10, 2022 9:49 PM
To: JFW-Users@groups.io
Subject: [jfw-users] New Subscriber Contemplating Switching from NVDA to JAWS with A Few Questions

 

Hi all. I've been playing with JAWS 2022 for a little while now. I'm a
long-time user of NVDA and like it, but I'm interested in some of the
features JAWS
provides that NVDA doesn't, and I'd like to start using Braille more
since I love Braille and am autistic and sometimes have periods of
sensory overload
with all my screen readers going off around me and other noises in my
environment. I know JAWS provides better Braille support, and I'm hoping
to get a
Braille display soon. I have a few questions though. Are there any
resources for finding scripts? I'm used to looking for add-ons in one
location, like
the NVDA add-ons website. Also, is there a way to make JAWS speak
passwords? With NVDA, I have an add-on that does this. Does anyone know
of any training
resources for people who already know how to use a computer, advanced
computer users, or people who have used other screen readers? I looked
at the basic
training materials, but they seemed a little basic for my needs.
Finally, is there anyone who has made this switch and might be able to
give me some tips on switching? Thanks.


Re: Chrome question

K0LNY
 


I'm guessing it is a version of Chrome that is like FireFox's ESR version, which works better because updates don't brake accessibility.
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Saturday, June 11, 2022 10:31 AM
Subject: Re: [jfw-users] Chrome question

No, she is not, I get this all the time, but I am not sure what exactly it is, either. I’ll try to get some more information and post it here.

 

 

From: jfw-users@groups.io <jfw-users@groups.io> On Behalf Of Brian Vogel
Sent: Saturday, June 11, 2022 7:25 AM
To: jfw-users@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jfw-users] Chrome question

 

What, precisely, was the alert text?

My gut tells me you're somehow using a very out-of-date version of Chrome, but without explicit message text it's all shooting in the dark.
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Brian - Windows 10, 64-Bit, Version 21H2, Build 19044  

A man's worst difficulties begin when he is able to do as he likes.

       ~ Thomas H. Huxley (1876)

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