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ADMIN: Re: [jaws-users] Jaws friendly laptop

Rick Justice <ricjustice@...>
 

If you know something is off-topic, then why post it?
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Please do so!

Richard Q. Justice-list moderator
jaws-users-list@groups.io

----- Original Message -----
From: "Glenn / Lenny" <glennervin@...>
To: <jaws-users-list@groups.io>
Sent: Monday, August 05, 2019 4:39 PM
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] Jaws friendly laptop


Although this is off topic for Jaws, I'll mention that an affordable SSD
solution is to get an adapter that fits as a 2.5 inch SATA drive, but has
plugs for SD or CF cards.
I use one of these on my Acer laptop with 2 32 GB CF cards in it, and it is
faster than a mechanical drive.
Glenn



From: valiant8086
Sent: Monday, August 05, 2019 3:28 PM
To: jaws-users-list@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] Jaws friendly laptop


Hi.




Yes, this is true. For the most part, though, this issue isn't actually how
an ssd will fail you. If the controller on the ssd fails, the entire disk
becomes unusable. I'm not sure if recovery companies would be able to
install a new controller in the drive in order to recover lost data, but
that's what I hear is the real issue here. Ssds lose sectors over time by
how many times they've been written to. Hdds lose sectors over time by how
many times they have been read from, as well as just general ware and tear.
Ssds make less heat and use less energy than most Hdds, and are generally
way more responsive. I've got a hard drive with north of fourty thousand
hours on it, and I've got 4 ssds all of which are north of 5000, a couple
are north of 30000, which show absolutely no signs of failure. At this
point, I can come up with no reason not to get an ssd, except for possibly
price, and possibly the no noise issue.




Some ssds actually do make noise, sometimes a buzzing chatter, other ssds
may make a high pitched stacotto chirping noise. It depends on how the
machine handles coil line I think but am not positive. I believe for the
most part it's low end ssds that make the racket. While I'm on the subject
of low end, you can get low end ssds on Amazon today for pretty affordable
prices, I'm talking like 130 dollars for 1 tb. That may be a shorter lifed
drive, and it won't have the same kind of crazy performance as high end
ssds. High end SSDs today have changes in how they work to help alleviate
the sector failure issue we're talking about.








Cheers:
Aaron Spears, A.K.A. valiant8086. General Partner - Valiant Galaxy
Associates "We make Very Good Audiogames for the blind community -
http://valiantGalaxy.com"

<Sent with Thunderbird 52.1.0 portable>On 8/5/2019 1:38 PM, Gerald Levy via
Groups.Io wrote:




Yeah, this is an issue that makes me leery about buying a computer with an
SSD.?? Because an SSD emits no noise like a mechanical hard drive, it would
be almost impossible to tell for sure that your Windows 10 PC has shut down
successfully because there is no shutdown sound like in Windows 7.??
Sometimes, you might hear "JAWS for Windows" when the shutdown has
initiated, but there is no reliable way to tell whether it has powered off
unless it has a DVD drive on which you can simply press the eject button to
tell whether it is off.?? Also, I have read that although a solid state
drive may be more reliable as a mechanical hard drive, it may not last as
long because its memory cells tend to wear out over time and eventually
become unusable with repeated write cycles.?? Is this true?




Gerald








On 8/5/2019 12:13 PM, Glenn / Lenny wrote:

I like that the solid state drives are faster and more reliable, but I
don't like that you can't hear them booting up.
Often you are wondering what the computer is doing, if it is booting up,
and you can't tell non-visually with solid state drives.
But again, this is a factor that has no bearing on Jaws.??
I do care about the audio on some laptops, some laptops, sold as
business models, at least in the past, have had terrible sound.
But now that we use laptops in the business world for things like Power
Point and the like, perhaps poor quality??audio is becoming more of a rarity
in laptops.
This is something you might find out about by reading reviews on models
on-line, before you decide.
Glenn


From: chris judge
Sent: Monday, August 05, 2019 11:01 AM
To: jaws-users-list@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] Jaws friendly laptop


The solid state drives are wonderful. My new dell desktop has one, as
does my slightly older Dell laptop. I???d never purchase another computer
without one.

??

From: jaws-users-list@groups.io <jaws-users-list@groups.io> On Behalf Of
John R Vaughn
Sent: August 5, 2019 12:11 PM
To: jaws-users-list@groups.io
Subject: [jaws-users] Jaws friendly laptop

??

List, my Toshiba laptop is in need of replacement.

Have any of you on the list recently purchased a new 15.6 inch screen
laptop computer that works well with jaws?

I would like another laptop that has a built in keypad.

Also, has jaws worked well with the new solid state drives?

Thanks for any help.

Like many of us using jaws and access technology for the last 28 years,
can remember in the past being sure we got a laptop with the right kind of
video card and audio card.?? That said my current Toshiba was bought off
Amazon with standard video and audio card.

Again, thanks for any ideas or suggestions.

John in sunny southwest Florida