Date   

JAWS will not work with a PDF file with interactive form fields

Loy
 

Is there a way to use JAWS to fill in fields in a pdf file that has the interactive form fields? I could not get it wo work, had to go back to Window Eyes  for this.


Re: Chrome, Explanation as to Why it has so Many Processes Running

Sadam Ahmed
 

Excellent blog post.

Thanks for sharing Mike.

Sincerely,

Sadam Ahmed


On 10/13/2018 10:30 AM, Mike B. wrote:
Hi All,
 
 
This article might give some of you an idea what all goes on in the background when Chrome is running.

I found this blog post, and thought others on this list might be
interested in what it has to say about why so many google processes open
up when running the browser.

https://blog.chromium.org/2008/09/multi-process-architecture.html

In short, it opens a new process for each plugin and/or script on a web
page, to keep them isolated from the basic browser, thereby keeping the
computer as secure as possible from malicious pages.

Chromium Blog: Multi-process Architecture s1600-r/logo_chromium
 
Chromium Blog News and developments from the open source browser project
 
Multi-process Architecture Thursday, September 11, 2008 Unlike most current web browsers, Google Chrome uses many operating system processes to keep web sites separate from each other and from the rest of your computer.  In this blog post, I'll explain why using a multi-process architecture can be a big win for browsers on today's web.  I'll also talk about which parts of the browser belong in each process and in which situations Google Chrome creates new processes.
1. Why use multiple processes in a browser? In the days when most current browsers were designed, web pages were simple and had little or no active code in them.  It made sense for the browser to render all the pages you visited in the same process, to keep resource usage low. Today, however, we've seen a major shift towards active web content, ranging from pages with lots of JavaScript and Flash to full-blown "web apps" like Gmail.  Large parts of these apps run inside the browser, just like normal applications run on an operating system.  Just like an operating system, the browser must keep these apps separate from each other. On top of this, the parts of the browser that render HTML, JavaScript, and CSS have become extraordinarily complex over time.  These rendering engines frequently have bugs as they continue to evolve, and some of these bugs may cause the rendering engine to occasionally crash.  Also, rendering engines routinely face untrusted and even malicious code from the web, which may try to exploit these bugs to install malware on your computer. In this world, browsers that put everything in one process face real challenges for robustness, responsiveness, and security.  If one web app causes a crash in the rendering engine, it will take the rest of the browser with it, including any other web apps that are open.  Web apps often have to compete with each other for CPU time on a single thread, sometimes causing the entire browser to become unresponsive.  Security is also a concern, because a web page that exploits a vulnerability in the rendering engine can often take over your entire computer. It doesn't have to be this way, though.  Web apps are designed to be run independently of each other in your browser, and they could be run in parallel.  They don't need much access to your disk or devices, either.  The security policy used throughout the web ensures this, so that you can visit most web pages without worrying about your data or your computer's safety.  This means that it's possible to more completely isolate web apps from each other in the browser without breaking them.  The same is true of browser plug-ins like Flash, which are loosely coupled with the browser and can be separated from it without much trouble. Google Chrome takes advantage of these properties and puts web apps and plug-ins in separate processes from the browser itself.  This means that a rendering engine crash in one web app won't affect the browser or other web apps.  It means the OS can run web apps in parallel to increase their responsiveness, and it means the browser itself won't lock up if a particular web app or plug-in stops responding.  It also means we can run the rendering engine processes in a restrictive sandbox that helps limit the damage if an exploit does occur. Interestingly, using multiple processes means Google Chrome can have its own Task Manager (shown below), which you can get to by right clicking on the browser's title bar.  This Task Manager lets you track resource usage for each web app and plug-in, rather than for the entire browser.  It also lets you kill any web apps or plug-ins that have stopped responding, without having to restart the entire browser.
 
For all of these reasons, Google Chrome's multi-process architecture can help it be more robust, responsive, and secure than single process browsers.
2. What goes in each process? Google Chrome creates three different types of processes: browser, renderers, and plug-ins. Browser.  There's only one browser process, which manages the tabs, windows, and "chrome" of the browser.  This process also handles all interactions with the disk, network, user input, and display, but it makes no attempt to parse or render any content from the web. Renderers.  The browser process creates many renderer processes, each responsible for rendering web pages.  The renderer processes contain all the complex logic for handling HTML, JavaScript, CSS, images, and so on.  We achieve this using the open source WebKit rendering engine, which is also used by Apple's Safari web browser.  Each renderer process is run in a sandbox, which means it has almost no direct access to your disk, network, or display.  All interactions with web apps, including user input events and screen painting, must go through the browser process.  This lets the browser process monitor the renderers for suspicious activity, killing them if it suspects an exploit has occurred. Plug-ins.  The browser process also creates one process for each type of plug-in that is in use, such as Flash, Quicktime, or Adobe Reader.  These processes just contain the plug-ins themselves, along with some glue code to let them interact with the browser and renderers.
3. When should the browser create processes? Once Google Chrome has created its browser process, it will generally create one renderer process for each instance of a web site you visit.  This approach aims to keep pages from different web sites isolated from each other. You can think of this as using a different process for each tab in the browser, but allowing two tabs to share a process if they are related to each other and are showing the same site.  For example, if one tab opens another tab using JavaScript, or if you open a link to the same site in a new tab, the tabs will share a renderer process.  This lets the pages in these tabs communicate via JavaScript and share cached objects.  Conversely, if you type the URL of a different site into the location bar of a tab, we will swap in a new renderer process for the tab. Compatibility with existing web pages is important for us.  For this reason, we define a web site as a registered domain name, like google.com or bbc.co.uk.  This means we'll consider sub-domains like mail.google.com and maps.google.com as part of the same site.  This is necessary because there are cases where tabs from different sub-domains may try to communicate with each other via JavaScript, so we want to keep them in the same renderer process. There are a few caveats to this basic approach, however.  Your computer would start to slow down if we created too many processes, so we place a limit on the number of renderer processes that we create (20 in most cases).  Once we hit this limit, we'll start re-using the existing renderer processes for new tabs.  Thus, it's possible that the same renderer process could be used for more than one web site.  We also don't yet put cross-site frames in their own processes, and we don't yet swap a tab's renderer process for all types of cross-site navigations.  So far, we only swap a tab's process for navigations via the browser's "chrome," like the location bar or bookmarks.  Despite these caveats, Google Chrome will generally keep instances of different web sites isolated from each other in common usage. For each type of plug-in, Google Chrome will create a plug-in process when you first visit a page that uses it.  A short time after you close all pages using a particular plug-in, we will destroy its process. We'll post future blog entries as we refine our policies for creating and swapping among renderer processes.  In the mean time, we hope you see some of the benefits of a multi-process architecture when using Google Chrome.
Posted by Charlie Reis

--

Yours sincerely,
Sadam Ahmed

Watch my Windows 10 story on YouTube

FaceTime, iMessage & email: sadam@...

Ping Me On Facebook: Sadam Ahmed On Facebook

Ping Me On Skype: Call Sadam Ahmed On Skype


Chrome, Explanation as to Why it has so Many Processes Running

Mike B. <mike9902@...>
 


Hi All,
 
 
This article might give some of you an idea what all goes on in the background when Chrome is running.

I found this blog post, and thought others on this list might be
interested in what it has to say about why so many google processes open
up when running the browser.

https://blog.chromium.org/2008/09/multi-process-architecture.html

In short, it opens a new process for each plugin and/or script on a web
page, to keep them isolated from the basic browser, thereby keeping the
computer as secure as possible from malicious pages.

Chromium Blog: Multi-process Architecture s1600-r/logo_chromium
 
Chromium Blog News and developments from the open source browser project
 
Multi-process Architecture Thursday, September 11, 2008 Unlike most current web browsers, Google Chrome uses many operating system processes to keep web sites separate from each other and from the rest of your computer.  In this blog post, I'll explain why using a multi-process architecture can be a big win for browsers on today's web.  I'll also talk about which parts of the browser belong in each process and in which situations Google Chrome creates new processes.
1. Why use multiple processes in a browser? In the days when most current browsers were designed, web pages were simple and had little or no active code in them.  It made sense for the browser to render all the pages you visited in the same process, to keep resource usage low. Today, however, we've seen a major shift towards active web content, ranging from pages with lots of JavaScript and Flash to full-blown "web apps" like Gmail.  Large parts of these apps run inside the browser, just like normal applications run on an operating system.  Just like an operating system, the browser must keep these apps separate from each other. On top of this, the parts of the browser that render HTML, JavaScript, and CSS have become extraordinarily complex over time.  These rendering engines frequently have bugs as they continue to evolve, and some of these bugs may cause the rendering engine to occasionally crash.  Also, rendering engines routinely face untrusted and even malicious code from the web, which may try to exploit these bugs to install malware on your computer. In this world, browsers that put everything in one process face real challenges for robustness, responsiveness, and security.  If one web app causes a crash in the rendering engine, it will take the rest of the browser with it, including any other web apps that are open.  Web apps often have to compete with each other for CPU time on a single thread, sometimes causing the entire browser to become unresponsive.  Security is also a concern, because a web page that exploits a vulnerability in the rendering engine can often take over your entire computer. It doesn't have to be this way, though.  Web apps are designed to be run independently of each other in your browser, and they could be run in parallel.  They don't need much access to your disk or devices, either.  The security policy used throughout the web ensures this, so that you can visit most web pages without worrying about your data or your computer's safety.  This means that it's possible to more completely isolate web apps from each other in the browser without breaking them.  The same is true of browser plug-ins like Flash, which are loosely coupled with the browser and can be separated from it without much trouble. Google Chrome takes advantage of these properties and puts web apps and plug-ins in separate processes from the browser itself.  This means that a rendering engine crash in one web app won't affect the browser or other web apps.  It means the OS can run web apps in parallel to increase their responsiveness, and it means the browser itself won't lock up if a particular web app or plug-in stops responding.  It also means we can run the rendering engine processes in a restrictive sandbox that helps limit the damage if an exploit does occur. Interestingly, using multiple processes means Google Chrome can have its own Task Manager (shown below), which you can get to by right clicking on the browser's title bar.  This Task Manager lets you track resource usage for each web app and plug-in, rather than for the entire browser.  It also lets you kill any web apps or plug-ins that have stopped responding, without having to restart the entire browser.
 
For all of these reasons, Google Chrome's multi-process architecture can help it be more robust, responsive, and secure than single process browsers.
2. What goes in each process? Google Chrome creates three different types of processes: browser, renderers, and plug-ins. Browser.  There's only one browser process, which manages the tabs, windows, and "chrome" of the browser.  This process also handles all interactions with the disk, network, user input, and display, but it makes no attempt to parse or render any content from the web. Renderers.  The browser process creates many renderer processes, each responsible for rendering web pages.  The renderer processes contain all the complex logic for handling HTML, JavaScript, CSS, images, and so on.  We achieve this using the open source WebKit rendering engine, which is also used by Apple's Safari web browser.  Each renderer process is run in a sandbox, which means it has almost no direct access to your disk, network, or display.  All interactions with web apps, including user input events and screen painting, must go through the browser process.  This lets the browser process monitor the renderers for suspicious activity, killing them if it suspects an exploit has occurred. Plug-ins.  The browser process also creates one process for each type of plug-in that is in use, such as Flash, Quicktime, or Adobe Reader.  These processes just contain the plug-ins themselves, along with some glue code to let them interact with the browser and renderers.
3. When should the browser create processes? Once Google Chrome has created its browser process, it will generally create one renderer process for each instance of a web site you visit.  This approach aims to keep pages from different web sites isolated from each other. You can think of this as using a different process for each tab in the browser, but allowing two tabs to share a process if they are related to each other and are showing the same site.  For example, if one tab opens another tab using JavaScript, or if you open a link to the same site in a new tab, the tabs will share a renderer process.  This lets the pages in these tabs communicate via JavaScript and share cached objects.  Conversely, if you type the URL of a different site into the location bar of a tab, we will swap in a new renderer process for the tab. Compatibility with existing web pages is important for us.  For this reason, we define a web site as a registered domain name, like google.com or bbc.co.uk.  This means we'll consider sub-domains like mail.google.com and maps.google.com as part of the same site.  This is necessary because there are cases where tabs from different sub-domains may try to communicate with each other via JavaScript, so we want to keep them in the same renderer process. There are a few caveats to this basic approach, however.  Your computer would start to slow down if we created too many processes, so we place a limit on the number of renderer processes that we create (20 in most cases).  Once we hit this limit, we'll start re-using the existing renderer processes for new tabs.  Thus, it's possible that the same renderer process could be used for more than one web site.  We also don't yet put cross-site frames in their own processes, and we don't yet swap a tab's renderer process for all types of cross-site navigations.  So far, we only swap a tab's process for navigations via the browser's "chrome," like the location bar or bookmarks.  Despite these caveats, Google Chrome will generally keep instances of different web sites isolated from each other in common usage. For each type of plug-in, Google Chrome will create a plug-in process when you first visit a page that uses it.  A short time after you close all pages using a particular plug-in, we will destroy its process. We'll post future blog entries as we refine our policies for creating and swapping among renderer processes.  In the mean time, we hope you see some of the benefits of a multi-process architecture when using Google Chrome.
Posted by Charlie Reis


Re: Saving or forwarding a you tube article

Dale Heltzer
 

It is also possible to capture and convert Youtube videos to various formats by using an online conversion tool:
https://www.onlinevideoconverter.com/video-converter

Note that some videos will not convert - I assume because their content has some kind of copyright status and I'd venture to guess this is embedded in the content.
HTH

Be well

-----Original Message-----
From: jaws-users-list@groups.io <jaws-users-list@groups.io> On Behalf Of Mr. Ed
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 3:02 PM
To: jaws-users-list@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] Saving or forwarding a you tube article

Hi Fred,
Try this.
1. Start the youtube playing.
2. Now press alt+D. This will highlight the web address.
3. Now press ctrl + C to copy the web address to the clip board.
Now you can paste the web address in an email to email it to someone or you can paste it into a note pad or word and save the link to open it later.
Hope this does what you want.
Mr. Ed

-----Original Message-----
From: jaws-users-list@groups.io [mailto:jaws-users-list@groups.io] On Behalf Of Fred Adams
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 9:52 AM
To: jaws-users IO
Subject: [jaws-users] Saving or forwarding a you tube article

I am using W 10, jaws 2019
beta and chrome browser and I
would like to know if it is
possible to save or forward an
article that I am listening to
on you tube without saving or
forwarding every article on
the you tube list. I will
appreciate any suggestions on
this.

Thanks much,

FRED C. ADAMS W4HC
THE NIGHT IS FAR SPENT AND
THE DAY IS AT HAND


Re: Webpages Timing Out

Matthew Chao
 

No, I'll stick with what I have for now. Just wish it would be a better performer.--Matt.

On 10/12/2018 3:10 PM, Adrian Spratt wrote:
If you really feel the need, I believe you can download earlier versions of JAWS. It's been reported on this list that you can install earlier versions without worrying about their impact on the one you have installed. I mean to check with VFO/whatever if I take that step.
-----Original Message-----
From: jaws-users-list@groups.io <jaws-users-list@groups.io> On Behalf Of Matthew Chao
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 2:32 PM
To: jaws-users-list@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out
Hi, Dave. I'm one of those unfortunates who had to migrate from Window-Eyes to Jaws, so I don't know what 17 was like. Anyway, will try NVDA as an experiment.--Matt.
On 10/12/2018 11:41 AM, Dave... wrote:
Matt,

Well if you have had the ongoing problems with JAWS being hesitant or
very slow to respond since version 17, then yes, I'd think JAWS is the culprit.
Give NVDA a try for a while to see if the problem disappears. I might
do that, myself just for grins.

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer


----- Original Message -----
From: "Matthew Chao" <mattchao@...>
To: <jaws-users-list@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 08:36
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out


I seem to do that all the time. I have FIOS, and this shouldn't be
happening. Perhaps Jaws slows things down?--Matt.



On 10/12/2018 11:33 AM, Dave... wrote:
Matthew,

This sounds like a slow connection. Happens to me once in a while,
perhaps every other week or so. Close that window and click again on
the embedded link to wake it up.

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer


----- Original Message -----
From: "Matthew Chao" <mattchao@...>
To: <jaws-users-list@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 08:00
Subject: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out


Hi, Folks. I'm using Jaws 2018. I notice that when I often go into
a page from a link within an email, I get a "webpage timed out". Any
way to stop this from happening? I often have to get out of IE and
back in again. It also happens with Google Chrome.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.--Matthew Chao















Re: Saving or forwarding a you tube article

Mr. Ed
 

Hi Fred,
Try this.
1. Start the youtube playing.
2. Now press alt+D. This will highlight the web address.
3. Now press ctrl + C to copy the web address to the clip board.
Now you can paste the web address in an email to email it to someone or you
can paste it into a note pad or word and save the link to open it later.
Hope this does what you want.
Mr. Ed

-----Original Message-----
From: jaws-users-list@groups.io [mailto:jaws-users-list@groups.io] On Behalf
Of Fred Adams
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 9:52 AM
To: jaws-users IO
Subject: [jaws-users] Saving or forwarding a you tube article

I am using W 10, jaws 2019
beta and chrome browser and I
would like to know if it is
possible to save or forward an
article that I am listening to
on you tube without saving or
forwarding every article on
the you tube list. I will
appreciate any suggestions on
this.

Thanks much,

FRED C. ADAMS W4HC
THE NIGHT IS FAR SPENT AND
THE DAY IS AT HAND


Re: Webpages Timing Out

netbat66
 

no,no.
you have to use the portible firefox version or else you will overwrite your current full installed version.
with a portable version everything is contained on a flash drive or in a folder you create yourself then paste the unzipped files into it. then create the desktop icon manually for the portible version.
then you can choose between your full installed version or the portible version.

-----Original Message-----
From: Adrian Spratt
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 12:10 PM
To: jaws-users-list@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out

If you really feel the need, I believe you can download earlier versions of JAWS. It's been reported on this list that you can install earlier versions without worrying about their impact on the one you have installed. I mean to check with VFO/whatever if I take that step.

-----Original Message-----
From: jaws-users-list@groups.io <jaws-users-list@groups.io> On Behalf Of Matthew Chao
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 2:32 PM
To: jaws-users-list@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out

Hi, Dave. I'm one of those unfortunates who had to migrate from Window-Eyes to Jaws, so I don't know what 17 was like. Anyway, will try NVDA as an experiment.--Matt.



On 10/12/2018 11:41 AM, Dave... wrote:
Matt,

Well if you have had the ongoing problems with JAWS being hesitant or
very slow to respond since version 17, then yes, I'd think JAWS is the culprit.
Give NVDA a try for a while to see if the problem disappears. I might
do that, myself just for grins.

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer


----- Original Message -----
From: "Matthew Chao" <mattchao@...>
To: <jaws-users-list@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 08:36
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out


I seem to do that all the time. I have FIOS, and this shouldn't be
happening. Perhaps Jaws slows things down?--Matt.



On 10/12/2018 11:33 AM, Dave... wrote:
Matthew,

This sounds like a slow connection. Happens to me once in a while,
perhaps every other week or so. Close that window and click again on
the embedded link to wake it up.

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer


----- Original Message -----
From: "Matthew Chao" <mattchao@...>
To: <jaws-users-list@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 08:00
Subject: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out


Hi, Folks. I'm using Jaws 2018. I notice that when I often go into
a page from a link within an email, I get a "webpage timed out". Any
way to stop this from happening? I often have to get out of IE and
back in again. It also happens with Google Chrome.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.--Matthew Chao















How to get the old Alt Tab dialog in Windows 10 Back

Mike B. <mike9902@...>
 

Hi All,
 
Running Windows 10 Pro and Jaws latest.  Rick a fellow moderator told me about this quite some time back and it works great!  I came across this, tried it and it works as advertised.  I didn't do the registry hack personally, but downloaded the program and made the change with their program.  Here's the website to hear how it works and the download link & steps are below the website URL.
 
 
To download the program click on the link below, press the letter, B for button, then up arrow a few times to the download link.

 
Take care.  Mike.  Go Dodgers!
Sent from my iBarstool.
Arguing with a woman is like reading a software license agreement.  In the end you have to ignore everything, & click I agree.


Re: JAWS 2018 and 2019 beta with Word 2016

Adrian Spratt
 

Oh, and I've done a JAWS repair and two Office 2016 repairs.

-----Original Message-----
From: jaws-users-list@groups.io <jaws-users-list@groups.io> On Behalf Of Adrian Spratt
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 3:16 PM
To: jaws-users-list@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] JAWS 2018 and 2019 beta with Word 2016

Hi, Ann.
I do that unload/reload trick. It doesn't help. So I close Word and also close JAWS. Then I bring back JAWS and then Word. That will work for a little while. Eventually, I have to reboot, which I'm now doing several times a day.
Also, I maximize the window and tinker with the screen resolution. Neither helps.
Grrr.
But surely there's a clue in the fact that JAWS reads Word documents fine in "say all" and with the MS paragraph commands. I just can't fathom what it might be.

-----Original Message-----
From: jaws-users-list@groups.io <jaws-users-list@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ann Byrne
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 2:24 PM
To: jaws-users-list@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] JAWS 2018 and 2019 beta with Word 2016

When Word gets squirly, sometimes it helps to unload/reload with
insert+windows+f4.
Good luck!

At 11:59 AM 10/12/2018, you wrote:
I reported the 2018 problem to tech support last Friday and the 2019
beta to the beta submissions page today. My OS is Windows 10.

After working with word 2016 for a very short while, JAWS stops reading
by character, word or line. It does read with "say all" and with the
control up/down arrow paragraph commands. I feel as though there's a
clue here, but I can't figure it out. I've maximized the window and
also adjusted screen resolution to the level that Mike B find works on
his systems. Nothing stops this behavior.

With the 2019 beta, I don't know if this behavior persists because
another problem gets in the way as soon as I start reading with "say
all." Every so often, JAWS will repeat a phrase or sentence. It happens
so often that it gets completely distracting, so I go back to 2018. But
it doesn't take long before I'm copying documents into Notepad and even
Outlook 2016 email messages just in order to do my nitpicky editing.

Any thoughts?


Re: JAWS 2018 and 2019 beta with Word 2016

Adrian Spratt
 

Hi, Ann.
I do that unload/reload trick. It doesn't help. So I close Word and also close JAWS. Then I bring back JAWS and then Word. That will work for a little while. Eventually, I have to reboot, which I'm now doing several times a day.
Also, I maximize the window and tinker with the screen resolution. Neither helps.
Grrr.
But surely there's a clue in the fact that JAWS reads Word documents fine in "say all" and with the MS paragraph commands. I just can't fathom what it might be.

-----Original Message-----
From: jaws-users-list@groups.io <jaws-users-list@groups.io> On Behalf Of Ann Byrne
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 2:24 PM
To: jaws-users-list@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] JAWS 2018 and 2019 beta with Word 2016

When Word gets squirly, sometimes it helps to unload/reload with
insert+windows+f4.
Good luck!

At 11:59 AM 10/12/2018, you wrote:
I reported the 2018 problem to tech support last Friday and the 2019
beta to the beta submissions page today. My OS is Windows 10.

After working with word 2016 for a very short while, JAWS stops reading
by character, word or line. It does read with "say all" and with the
control up/down arrow paragraph commands. I feel as though there's a
clue here, but I can't figure it out. I've maximized the window and
also adjusted screen resolution to the level that Mike B find works on
his systems. Nothing stops this behavior.

With the 2019 beta, I don't know if this behavior persists because
another problem gets in the way as soon as I start reading with "say
all." Every so often, JAWS will repeat a phrase or sentence. It happens
so often that it gets completely distracting, so I go back to 2018. But
it doesn't take long before I'm copying documents into Notepad and even
Outlook 2016 email messages just in order to do my nitpicky editing.

Any thoughts?


Re: Webpages Timing Out

Adrian Spratt
 

If you really feel the need, I believe you can download earlier versions of JAWS. It's been reported on this list that you can install earlier versions without worrying about their impact on the one you have installed. I mean to check with VFO/whatever if I take that step.

-----Original Message-----
From: jaws-users-list@groups.io <jaws-users-list@groups.io> On Behalf Of Matthew Chao
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 2:32 PM
To: jaws-users-list@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out

Hi, Dave. I'm one of those unfortunates who had to migrate from Window-Eyes to Jaws, so I don't know what 17 was like. Anyway, will try NVDA as an experiment.--Matt.



On 10/12/2018 11:41 AM, Dave... wrote:
Matt,

Well if you have had the ongoing problems with JAWS being hesitant or
very slow to respond since version 17, then yes, I'd think JAWS is the culprit.
Give NVDA a try for a while to see if the problem disappears. I might
do that, myself just for grins.

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer


----- Original Message -----
From: "Matthew Chao" <mattchao@...>
To: <jaws-users-list@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 08:36
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out


I seem to do that all the time. I have FIOS, and this shouldn't be
happening. Perhaps Jaws slows things down?--Matt.



On 10/12/2018 11:33 AM, Dave... wrote:
Matthew,

This sounds like a slow connection. Happens to me once in a while,
perhaps every other week or so. Close that window and click again on
the embedded link to wake it up.

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer


----- Original Message -----
From: "Matthew Chao" <mattchao@...>
To: <jaws-users-list@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 08:00
Subject: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out


Hi, Folks. I'm using Jaws 2018. I notice that when I often go into
a page from a link within an email, I get a "webpage timed out". Any
way to stop this from happening? I often have to get out of IE and
back in again. It also happens with Google Chrome.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.--Matthew Chao















Re: Webpages Timing Out

Dave... <dgcarlson@...>
 

Matt,
No, what I noticed was a dramatic change in Jaws behavior between jaws 16 and the jaws 17. That behavior has carried over through versions 18, 2018, and who knows?

Dave

On Oct 12, 2018, at 11:31 AM, Matthew Chao <mattchao@...> wrote:

Hi, Dave. I'm one of those unfortunates who had to migrate from Window-Eyes to Jaws, so I don't know what 17 was like. Anyway, will try NVDA as an experiment.--Matt.



On 10/12/2018 11:41 AM, Dave... wrote:
Matt,
Well if you have had the ongoing problems with JAWS being hesitant or very
slow to respond since version 17, then yes, I'd think JAWS is the culprit.
Give NVDA a try for a while to see if the problem disappears. I might do
that, myself just for grins.
Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer
----- Original Message -----
From: "Matthew Chao" <mattchao@...>
To: <jaws-users-list@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 08:36
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out
I seem to do that all the time. I have FIOS, and this shouldn't be
happening. Perhaps Jaws slows things down?--Matt.
On 10/12/2018 11:33 AM, Dave... wrote:
Matthew,

This sounds like a slow connection. Happens to me once in a while, perhaps
every other week or so. Close that window and click again on the embedded
link to wake it up.

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer


----- Original Message -----
From: "Matthew Chao" <mattchao@...>
To: <jaws-users-list@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 08:00
Subject: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out


Hi, Folks. I'm using Jaws 2018. I notice that when I often go into a
page from a link within an email, I get a "webpage timed out". Any way
to stop this from happening? I often have to get out of IE and back in
again. It also happens with Google Chrome.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.--Matthew Chao









Re: JAWS 2018 and 2019 beta with Word 2016

Dave... <dgcarlson@...>
 

True, but why should we have to? JAWS seems to grow more complex and more
"squirrily" with each edition, methinks.

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

----- Original Message -----
From: "Ann Byrne" <annakb@...>
To: <jaws-users-list@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 11:24
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] JAWS 2018 and 2019 beta with Word 2016


When Word gets squirly, sometimes it helps to unload/reload with
insert+windows+f4.
Good luck!

At 11:59 AM 10/12/2018, you wrote:
I reported the 2018 problem to tech support last Friday and the 2019
beta to the beta submissions page today. My OS is Windows 10.

After working with word 2016 for a very short while, JAWS stops
reading by character, word or line. It does read with "say all" and
with the control up/down arrow paragraph commands. I feel as though
there's a clue here, but I can't figure it out. I've maximized the
window and also adjusted screen resolution to the level that Mike B
find works on his systems. Nothing stops this behavior.

With the 2019 beta, I don't know if this behavior persists because
another problem gets in the way as soon as I start reading with "say
all." Every so often, JAWS will repeat a phrase or sentence. It
happens so often that it gets completely distracting, so I go back
to 2018. But it doesn't take long before I'm copying documents into
Notepad and even Outlook 2016 email messages just in order to do my
nitpicky editing.

Any thoughts?


Re: Webpages Timing Out

Matthew Chao
 

Hi, Dave. I'm one of those unfortunates who had to migrate from Window-Eyes to Jaws, so I don't know what 17 was like. Anyway, will try NVDA as an experiment.--Matt.

On 10/12/2018 11:41 AM, Dave... wrote:
Matt,
Well if you have had the ongoing problems with JAWS being hesitant or very
slow to respond since version 17, then yes, I'd think JAWS is the culprit.
Give NVDA a try for a while to see if the problem disappears. I might do
that, myself just for grins.
Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer
----- Original Message -----
From: "Matthew Chao" <mattchao@...>
To: <jaws-users-list@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 08:36
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out
I seem to do that all the time. I have FIOS, and this shouldn't be
happening. Perhaps Jaws slows things down?--Matt.
On 10/12/2018 11:33 AM, Dave... wrote:
Matthew,

This sounds like a slow connection. Happens to me once in a while, perhaps
every other week or so. Close that window and click again on the embedded
link to wake it up.

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer


----- Original Message -----
From: "Matthew Chao" <mattchao@...>
To: <jaws-users-list@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 08:00
Subject: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out


Hi, Folks. I'm using Jaws 2018. I notice that when I often go into a
page from a link within an email, I get a "webpage timed out". Any way
to stop this from happening? I often have to get out of IE and back in
again. It also happens with Google Chrome.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.--Matthew Chao









Re: JAWS 2018 and 2019 beta with Word 2016

Ann Byrne
 

When Word gets squirly, sometimes it helps to unload/reload with insert+windows+f4.
Good luck!

At 11:59 AM 10/12/2018, you wrote:
I reported the 2018 problem to tech support last Friday and the 2019 beta to the beta submissions page today. My OS is Windows 10.

After working with word 2016 for a very short while, JAWS stops reading by character, word or line. It does read with "say all" and with the control up/down arrow paragraph commands. I feel as though there's a clue here, but I can't figure it out. I've maximized the window and also adjusted screen resolution to the level that Mike B find works on his systems. Nothing stops this behavior.

With the 2019 beta, I don't know if this behavior persists because another problem gets in the way as soon as I start reading with "say all." Every so often, JAWS will repeat a phrase or sentence. It happens so often that it gets completely distracting, so I go back to 2018. But it doesn't take long before I'm copying documents into Notepad and even Outlook 2016 email messages just in order to do my nitpicky editing.

Any thoughts?


Re: Reading PDF files with edge

Ann Byrne
 

Can you open the file with Adobe instead of Edge???

At 09:56 AM 10/12/2018, you wrote:
Yeah, used to work on the files I am trying to read but no longer.


-----Original Message-----
From: jaws-users-list@groups.io <jaws-users-list@groups.io> On Behalf Of Van
Lant, Robin via Groups.Io
Sent: Thursday, October 11, 2018 9:59 AM
To: jaws-users-list@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] Reading PDF files with edge

If possible, I often save PDFs to my computer. Then, you could use the JAWS
OCR option to read it without going into Acrobat.


-----Original Message-----
From: jaws-users-list@groups.io <jaws-users-list@groups.io> On Behalf Of
Bill Holton
Sent: Wednesday, October 10, 2018 3:13 PM
To: jaws-users-list@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] Reading PDF files with edge

I will do practically anything not to have to install an Adobe app on my
computer.

On Oct 10, 2018, at 5:06 PM, Van Lant, Robin via Groups.Io
<Robin_Van_Lant=Key.com@groups.io> wrote:

I haven't gotten it to work, so I changed my default app settings to load
them in Acrobat.


-----Original Message-----
From: jaws-users-list@groups.io <jaws-users-list@groups.io> On Behalf
Of netbat66
Sent: Wednesday, October 10, 2018 2:32 PM
To: jaws-users-list@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] Reading PDF files with edge

i don't think the pdf reader has any accessibility options. at least
it didn't when i used the windows 10 annaversery version.
see if the accessible adobe version is availible for windows 10. this
might work.
wait for other posters responses before you try it.

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Holton
Sent: Wednesday, October 10, 2018 12:03 PM
To: jaws-users-list@groups.io
Subject: [jaws-users] Reading PDF files with edge

I tried a few bank statements using edge, but I could never get past
the menus to the actual text. The same files would not read well if I
loaded them into word. Anyone know of a resource that explains how do
you use edge to read PDFs with jaws?








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Re: Webpages Timing Out

netbat66
 

do web pages load slower then normal or to try again?
maybe if you re seat the router cables to wipe off corrosion your speed would be faster.
***
that depends on the email client being used.
i only use wlm. so i don't know what happens with other clients.
if it can't connect i get several errors.
it can say the server could not be found. it could not connect. the user name or password was rejected etc.

-----Original Message-----
From: Dave...
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 9:36 AM
To: jaws-users-list@groups.io
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out

Does the secure server protocol slow things down?

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer


----- Original Message -----
From: "netbat66" <netbat66@...>
To: <jaws-users-list@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 09:24
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out


maybe the email client protocols are not set right?
is the in and out going mail settings set to use a secure server?
you would have to check for your i s p settings needed for your email
program.

-----Original Message-----
From: Matthew Chao
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 8:00 AM
To: jaws-users-list@groups.io
Subject: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out

Hi, Folks. I'm using Jaws 2018. I notice that when I often go into a
page from a link within an email, I get a "webpage timed out". Any way
to stop this from happening? I often have to get out of IE and back in
again. It also happens with Google Chrome.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.--Matthew Chao


JAWS 2018 and 2019 beta with Word 2016

Adrian Spratt
 

I reported the 2018 problem to tech support last Friday and the 2019 beta to the beta submissions page today. My OS is Windows 10.

 

After working with word 2016 for a very short while, JAWS stops reading by character, word or line. It does read with “say all” and with the control up/down arrow paragraph commands. I feel as though there’s a clue here, but I can’t figure it out. I’ve maximized the window and also adjusted screen resolution to the level that Mike B find works on his systems. Nothing stops this behavior.

 

With the 2019 beta, I don’t know if this behavior persists because another problem gets in the way as soon as I start reading with “say all.” Every so often, JAWS will repeat a phrase or sentence. It happens so often that it gets completely distracting, so I go back to 2018. But it doesn’t take long before I’m copying documents into Notepad and even Outlook 2016 email messages just in order to do my nitpicky editing.

 

Any thoughts?


Re: Webpages Timing Out

Dave... <dgcarlson@...>
 

Does the secure server protocol slow things down?

Dave
Oregonian, woodworker, Engineer, Musician, and Pioneer

----- Original Message -----
From: "netbat66" <netbat66@...>
To: <jaws-users-list@groups.io>
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 09:24
Subject: Re: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out


maybe the email client protocols are not set right?
is the in and out going mail settings set to use a secure server?
you would have to check for your i s p settings needed for your email
program.

-----Original Message-----
From: Matthew Chao
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 8:00 AM
To: jaws-users-list@groups.io
Subject: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out

Hi, Folks. I'm using Jaws 2018. I notice that when I often go into a
page from a link within an email, I get a "webpage timed out". Any way
to stop this from happening? I often have to get out of IE and back in
again. It also happens with Google Chrome.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.--Matthew Chao


Re: Webpages Timing Out

netbat66
 

maybe the email client protocols are not set right?
is the in and out going mail settings set to use a secure server?
you would have to check for your i s p settings needed for your email program.

-----Original Message-----
From: Matthew Chao
Sent: Friday, October 12, 2018 8:00 AM
To: jaws-users-list@groups.io
Subject: [jaws-users] Webpages Timing Out

Hi, Folks. I'm using Jaws 2018. I notice that when I often go into a
page from a link within an email, I get a "webpage timed out". Any way
to stop this from happening? I often have to get out of IE and back in
again. It also happens with Google Chrome.

Thanks in advance for any suggestions.--Matthew Chao