[IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main board.


David Smith <w6te@...>
 

Hi,

How do set the fan to be constantly on?

Thanks,

Dave W6TE

----- Original Message -----
From: voiceswithinthehead<mailto:HarryHoo@cox.net>
To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com<mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2010 8:24 PM
Subject: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main board.



I would like to see your file for this mod.
can you send the file to my email address directly?
harryhoo@cox.net<mailto:harryhoo@cox.net>

Did you set the fan to stay contantly on, along wwith the other mods you performed?

--- In ic7000@yahoogroups.com<mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com>, "WA9FVP" <willcoele@...> wrote:
>
> Here's a glimps of my IC-7000 heat mod. Now if I can only get someone to upload the whole file.
>
> The main issue with the IC-7000 is the power management and component placement. Out of the 5 or 6 7000's I repaired, I found that the highest heat concentration was near IC-1901 and R1902 (both are mounted on the bottom side of the main board). R1902 is a 1.8 ohm surface mounted, power resistor in series with the 14v power. It feeds the 14 volts to IC1901 input (a 7808 3 terminal regulator). The 8 volt output from IC1901 feeds just about every board including the CPU, PA, Main, DDS and DSP. Using a Fluke 189 and a thermal probe, after 8 hours in receive mode, I measured temperatures that exceed 92.4oc or 198of on the top side of the main board. It's hotter on the bottom side and I can guarantee it's hotter than hell! With a few screws removed on the main board, there's enough room to reach under the board with my "pinky". It burnt my finger!
> There's a second 7808 (IC2001) and a 1.8 ohm resistor (R2011). It feeds 8 volts to an RF amplifier IC on the main board and to the control head. Here's where it gets strange. In previous models and that includes Yaseu and Kenwood, they would feed 12 volts to the control head and regulate down to 5 or 8 volts to power logic or analog circuits. The IC-7000 regulates down to 8 volts on the main board feeds the control head. To power LED's and the LCD backlight, there's a switching supply that kicks the voltage up to 12 volts. A 7805, 5v regulator (IC101) on the display unit feeds off the 8 volt line and powers the display logic. The second 8 volt regulator creates additional heat on the main board. There's a 470uF, electrolytic capacitor (C2610) on the top side, just above IC1901 that gets very hot. It's the audio amplifier coupling capacitor that drives the speaker. The extreme heat can shorten the life of the capacitor and degrade the audio level. When the IC-7000 top cover is removed temperatures will drop about 10oc
> I modified my IC-7000 by adding a copper heat sink fabricated from .012 thick, copper flashing. The copper was soldered to the ground tabs on both 8volt regulators and a second piece of .045 aluminum was added to fill the gap between the copper plate and the IC-7000 chassis. I also added two copper spacers measuring about .068 high that mate with the two resistors R1901 and R2011. The spacers were soldered to the copper. Using silicone pads to insulate the copper, I was hoping to remove heat away from the resistors.
>


Harry Hoo <HarryHoo@...>
 

re-wire the fan so when the unit is on, the fan will be on.



From: ic7000@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
David Smith
Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2010 8:28 PM
To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main
board.





Hi,

How do set the fan to be constantly on?

Thanks,

Dave W6TE

----- Original Message -----
From: voiceswithinthehead<mailto:HarryHoo@cox.net
<mailto:HarryHoo%40cox.net> >
To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com> >
Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2010 8:24 PM
Subject: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main
board.

I would like to see your file for this mod.
can you send the file to my email address directly?
harryhoo@cox.net <mailto:harryhoo%40cox.net> <mailto:harryhoo@cox.net
<mailto:harryhoo%40cox.net> >

Did you set the fan to stay contantly on, along wwith the other mods you
performed?

--- In ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com> >, "WA9FVP"
<willcoele@...> wrote:

Here's a glimps of my IC-7000 heat mod. Now if I can only get someone to
upload the whole file.

The main issue with the IC-7000 is the power management and component
placement. Out of the 5 or 6 7000's I repaired, I found that the highest
heat concentration was near IC-1901 and R1902 (both are mounted on the
bottom side of the main board). R1902 is a 1.8 ohm surface mounted, power
resistor in series with the 14v power. It feeds the 14 volts to IC1901 input
(a 7808 3 terminal regulator). The 8 volt output from IC1901 feeds just
about every board including the CPU, PA, Main, DDS and DSP. Using a Fluke
189 and a thermal probe, after 8 hours in receive mode, I measured
temperatures that exceed 92.4oc or 198of on the top side of the main board.
It's hotter on the bottom side and I can guarantee it's hotter than hell!
With a few screws removed on the main board, there's enough room to reach
under the board with my "pinky". It burnt my finger!
There's a second 7808 (IC2001) and a 1.8 ohm resistor (R2011). It feeds 8
volts to an RF amplifier IC on the main board and to the control head.
Here's where it gets strange. In previous models and that includes Yaseu and
Kenwood, they would feed 12 volts to the control head and regulate down to 5
or 8 volts to power logic or analog circuits. The IC-7000 regulates down to
8 volts on the main board feeds the control head. To power LED's and the LCD
backlight, there's a switching supply that kicks the voltage up to 12 volts.
A 7805, 5v regulator (IC101) on the display unit feeds off the 8 volt line
and powers the display logic. The second 8 volt regulator creates additional
heat on the main board. There's a 470uF, electrolytic capacitor (C2610) on
the top side, just above IC1901 that gets very hot. It's the audio amplifier
coupling capacitor that drives the speaker. The extreme heat can shorten the
life of the capacitor and degrade the audio level. When the IC-7000 top
cover is removed temperatures will drop about 10oc
I modified my IC-7000 by adding a copper heat sink fabricated from .012
thick, copper flashing. The copper was soldered to the ground tabs on both
8volt regulators and a second piece of .045 aluminum was added to fill the
gap between the copper plate and the IC-7000 chassis. I also added two
copper spacers measuring about .068 high that mate with the two resistors
R1901 and R2011. The spacers were soldered to the copper. Using silicone
pads to insulate the copper, I was hoping to remove heat away from the
resistors.


voiceswithinthehead <HarryHoo@...>
 

applying heatsinks to regulators and resistors is a good idea but without having any airflow by a fan or any convectional means, such as ventilation holes/slots at the top and bottom covers of the radio cases, (that should have been included in the design by Icom in the first place)These "heatsinks" are acting like radiators inside the radio, increasing overall temperatures within the radio.

Just the fact of the radios temperature alone, when used for reciving
only, is eveidence of poor chassis covers design for the lack of ventilation holes/slots.

I can bet that the new model that recplaces the IC-7000 will have this issue resolved.

--- In ic7000@yahoogroups.com, "David Smith" <w6te@...> wrote:

Hi,

How do set the fan to be constantly on?

Thanks,

Dave W6TE

----- Original Message -----
From: voiceswithinthehead<mailto:HarryHoo@...>
To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com<mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2010 8:24 PM
Subject: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main board.



I would like to see your file for this mod.
can you send the file to my email address directly?
harryhoo@...<mailto:harryhoo@...>

Did you set the fan to stay contantly on, along wwith the other mods you performed?

--- In ic7000@yahoogroups.com<mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com>, "WA9FVP" <willcoele@> wrote:
>
> Here's a glimps of my IC-7000 heat mod. Now if I can only get someone to upload the whole file.
>
> The main issue with the IC-7000 is the power management and component placement. Out of the 5 or 6 7000's I repaired, I found that the highest heat concentration was near IC-1901 and R1902 (both are mounted on the bottom side of the main board). R1902 is a 1.8 ohm surface mounted, power resistor in series with the 14v power. It feeds the 14 volts to IC1901 input (a 7808 3 terminal regulator). The 8 volt output from IC1901 feeds just about every board including the CPU, PA, Main, DDS and DSP. Using a Fluke 189 and a thermal probe, after 8 hours in receive mode, I measured temperatures that exceed 92.4oc or 198of on the top side of the main board. It's hotter on the bottom side and I can guarantee it's hotter than hell! With a few screws removed on the main board, there's enough room to reach under the board with my "pinky". It burnt my finger!
> There's a second 7808 (IC2001) and a 1.8 ohm resistor (R2011). It feeds 8 volts to an RF amplifier IC on the main board and to the control head. Here's where it gets strange. In previous models and that includes Yaseu and Kenwood, they would feed 12 volts to the control head and regulate down to 5 or 8 volts to power logic or analog circuits. The IC-7000 regulates down to 8 volts on the main board feeds the control head. To power LED's and the LCD backlight, there's a switching supply that kicks the voltage up to 12 volts. A 7805, 5v regulator (IC101) on the display unit feeds off the 8 volt line and powers the display logic. The second 8 volt regulator creates additional heat on the main board. There's a 470uF, electrolytic capacitor (C2610) on the top side, just above IC1901 that gets very hot. It's the audio amplifier coupling capacitor that drives the speaker. The extreme heat can shorten the life of the capacitor and degrade the audio level. When the IC-7000 top cover is removed temperatures will drop about 10oc
> I modified my IC-7000 by adding a copper heat sink fabricated from .012 thick, copper flashing. The copper was soldered to the ground tabs on both 8volt regulators and a second piece of .045 aluminum was added to fill the gap between the copper plate and the IC-7000 chassis. I also added two copper spacers measuring about .068 high that mate with the two resistors R1901 and R2011. The spacers were soldered to the copper. Using silicone pads to insulate the copper, I was hoping to remove heat away from the resistors.
>







Mark Krotz
 

On 6/1/2010 9:10 PM, voiceswithinthehead wrote:


I can bet that the new model that recplaces the IC-7000 will have this issue resolved.
This is not the first radio Icom has ever built. Nor is it the first time the operating temp of the IC-7K has been debated.


M


Harry Hoo <HarryHoo@...>
 

Hi Mark,



Please inform me of Icom model the IC-7000 replaced, that has the power and
some features and size of the IC-7000.



From: ic7000@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Mark Krotz
Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2010 9:19 PM
To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main
board.





On 6/1/2010 9:10 PM, voiceswithinthehead wrote:


I can bet that the new model that recplaces the IC-7000 will have this
issue resolved.
This is not the first radio Icom has ever built. Nor is it the first
time the operating temp of the IC-7K has been debated.

M


WA9FVP <willcoele@...>
 

The aluminum plate along with thermal grease transfers heat from the copper heatsink to ribs in the casting. I didn't bother to explore the bottom side of the casting where heat is transfered from the RF PA board. During receive, there's no heat generated by the RF PA so that's not a problem. I made several temperature readings on the main board during transmit and with the mod installed, main board actually cools down. When the fan stops during receive, the main board temperature increases by a few degrees. That didn't happen before I made the "mod". The 3 terminal regulators are on the left side os the chassis and the fan is on the right side. While the fan is running, there wasn't enough air flow on the left side to cool down the main board.

--- In ic7000@yahoogroups.com, "voiceswithinthehead" <HarryHoo@...> wrote:

applying heatsinks to regulators and resistors is a good idea but without having any airflow by a fan or any convectional means, such as ventilation holes/slots at the top and bottom covers of the radio cases, (that should have been included in the design by Icom in the first place)These "heatsinks" are acting like radiators inside the radio, increasing overall temperatures within the radio.

Just the fact of the radios temperature alone, when used for reciving
only, is eveidence of poor chassis covers design for the lack of ventilation holes/slots.

I can bet that the new model that recplaces the IC-7000 will have this issue resolved.


Mark Krotz
 

I never said anything about the IC7K replacing any model. I stated that it was not the first radio Icom built. Icom, formerly known as Inoue Communications of Japan, has been building radios for decades. I am fairly certain they considered heat budgets in the design of the IC7K. I've had mine since they first came out, and have never had any problem with it.

Part of the heat budgeting is the responsibility of the user, in making sure that the outside of the radio has proper ventilation, and that it is operated within the specified operating temperature range.

If you care to research the list archives, you will find lots of discussion from the past on this subject, some worth reviewing.


Mark

On 6/1/2010 9:27 PM, Harry Hoo wrote:
Hi Mark,



Please inform me of Icom model the IC-7000 replaced, that has the power and
some features and size of the IC-7000.



From: ic7000@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Mark Krotz
Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2010 9:19 PM
To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main
board.





On 6/1/2010 9:10 PM, voiceswithinthehead wrote:


I can bet that the new model that recplaces the IC-7000 will have this
issue resolved.
This is not the first radio Icom has ever built. Nor is it the first
time the operating temp of the IC-7K has been debated.

M


WA9FVP <willcoele@...>
 

I forgot to mention in my last post that I measured the cabinet temperature and there was no change after the "mod". Looking at the exploaded parts view in the service manual I can see that the area under two 3 terminal regulators is where the low pass filter is located and no heat is generated. The RF power transistors and driver is on the right side. The exploaded view also has a detailed drawing of the aluminum casting. The modification was done on the left side above the diagonal ribs.

--- In ic7000@yahoogroups.com, "voiceswithinthehead" <HarryHoo@...> wrote:

applying heatsinks to regulators and resistors is a good idea but without having any airflow by a fan or any convectional means, such as ventilation holes/slots at the top and bottom covers of the radio cases, (that should have been included in the design by Icom in the first place)These "heatsinks" are acting like radiators inside the radio, increasing overall temperatures within the radio.

Just the fact of the radios temperature alone, when used for reciving
only, is eveidence of poor chassis covers design for the lack of ventilation holes/slots.

I can bet that the new model that recplaces the IC-7000 will have this issue resolved.


WA9FVP <willcoele@...>
 

Mark,

Keep in mind that the radio is sold as a mobile radio. If you live in Arizona and your car is parked outside in the summer, when you get in you car to drive home and talk on your local repeater, you already exausted your heat budget. The Ic-7000 isn't the only model with heat issues. The 746 and 756 Pros had problems with an RF driver IC over heating. I repaired several IC-706 MK3G's where the surface mounted 5v regulator usoldered itself because it gets too hot.
The backlight circuit in the 746 and the 746pro will eventually burn out when a dim setting is selected.

--- In ic7000@yahoogroups.com, Mark Krotz <mkrotz@...> wrote:

I never said anything about the IC7K replacing any model. I stated that
it was not the first radio Icom built. Icom, formerly known as Inoue
Communications of Japan, has been building radios for decades. I am
fairly certain they considered heat budgets in the design of the IC7K.
I've had mine since they first came out, and have never had any problem
with it.

Part of the heat budgeting is the responsibility of the user, in making
sure that the outside of the radio has proper ventilation, and that it
is operated within the specified operating temperature range.

If you care to research the list archives, you will find lots of
discussion from the past on this subject, some worth reviewing.


Mark


James KB7TBT
 

This mod sounds like a good idea, but I have my issues handled.

I have a 2000 Xterra, I have my radio mounted under the passenger seat, there is an air duck that feeds the back seats, the radio is right in front of it. A flip of a switch to run the vents or A/C and it keeps it nice and cool.

There are lots of cars and trucks with this design, take a look under the seat to see if you are a lucky one.



James
KB7TBT@arrl.net
30M Digital #3727
EM84km
www.kb7tbt.com

Mark,

Keep in mind that the radio is sold as a mobile radio. If you live in Arizona and your car is parked outside in the summer, when you get in you car to drive home and talk on your local repeater, you already exausted your heat budget. The Ic-7000 isn't the only model with heat issues. The 746 and 756 Pros had problems with an RF driver IC over heating. I repaired several IC-706 MK3G's where the surface mounted 5v regulator usoldered itself because it gets too hot.


Harry Hoo <HarryHoo@...>
 

Mark, I never stated this was Icom's first radio made.

I been purchasing Icom products and installing it's products for over two
decades.

The IC7000 is Icom's First design of its kind. I am certain if any relevant
design issues are realized by Icom from its warranty repair case histories,

any relevant issues (and other additional features) to be included in the
mk2 version or new model number that replaces the IC7K.

Sorry for any misconceptions from my previous post.





From: ic7000@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Mark Krotz
Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2010 9:44 PM
To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main
board.





I never said anything about the IC7K replacing any model. I stated that
it was not the first radio Icom built. Icom, formerly known as Inoue
Communications of Japan, has been building radios for decades. I am
fairly certain they considered heat budgets in the design of the IC7K.
I've had mine since they first came out, and have never had any problem
with it.

Part of the heat budgeting is the responsibility of the user, in making
sure that the outside of the radio has proper ventilation, and that it
is operated within the specified operating temperature range.

If you care to research the list archives, you will find lots of
discussion from the past on this subject, some worth reviewing.

Mark

On 6/1/2010 9:27 PM, Harry Hoo wrote:
Hi Mark,



Please inform me of Icom model the IC-7000 replaced, that has the power
and
some features and size of the IC-7000.



From: ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf
Of
Mark Krotz
Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2010 9:19 PM
To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main
board.





On 6/1/2010 9:10 PM, voiceswithinthehead wrote:


I can bet that the new model that recplaces the IC-7000 will have this
issue resolved.
This is not the first radio Icom has ever built. Nor is it the first
time the operating temp of the IC-7K has been debated.

M


Harry Hoo <HarryHoo@...>
 

James,

Awesome thinking!



thanks for sharing!



From: ic7000@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
James - KB7TBT
Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2010 10:10 PM
To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main
board.





This mod sounds like a good idea, but I have my issues handled.

I have a 2000 Xterra, I have my radio mounted under the passenger seat,
there is an air duck that feeds the back seats, the radio is right in front
of it. A flip of a switch to run the vents or A/C and it keeps it nice and
cool.

There are lots of cars and trucks with this design, take a look under the
seat to see if you are a lucky one.

James
KB7TBT@arrl.net <mailto:KB7TBT%40arrl.net>
30M Digital #3727
EM84km
www.kb7tbt.com

Mark,

Keep in mind that the radio is sold as a mobile radio. If you live in
Arizona and your car is parked outside in the summer, when you get in you
car to drive home and talk on your local repeater, you already exausted
your heat budget. The Ic-7000 isn't the only model with heat issues. The
746 and 756 Pros had problems with an RF driver IC over heating. I
repaired several IC-706 MK3G's where the surface mounted 5v regulator
usoldered itself because it gets too hot.


Mark Krotz
 

I do live in AZ.

On 6/1/2010 9:59 PM, WA9FVP wrote:
Mark,

Keep in mind that the radio is sold as a mobile radio. If you live in Arizona and your car is parked outside in the summer, when you get in you car to drive home and talk on your local repeater, you already exausted your heat budget. The Ic-7000 isn't the only model with heat issues. The 746 and 756 Pros had problems with an RF driver IC over heating. I repaired several IC-706 MK3G's where the surface mounted 5v regulator usoldered itself because it gets too hot.
The backlight circuit in the 746 and the 746pro will eventually burn out when a dim setting is selected.

--- In ic7000@yahoogroups.com, Mark Krotz<mkrotz@...> wrote:

I never said anything about the IC7K replacing any model. I stated that
it was not the first radio Icom built. Icom, formerly known as Inoue
Communications of Japan, has been building radios for decades. I am
fairly certain they considered heat budgets in the design of the IC7K.
I've had mine since they first came out, and have never had any problem
with it.

Part of the heat budgeting is the responsibility of the user, in making
sure that the outside of the radio has proper ventilation, and that it
is operated within the specified operating temperature range.

If you care to research the list archives, you will find lots of
discussion from the past on this subject, some worth reviewing.


Mark


Harry Hoo <HarryHoo@...>
 

....exhausted your "heat budget"???



From: ic7000@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
WA9FVP
Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2010 9:59 PM
To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main
board.





Mark,

Keep in mind that the radio is sold as a mobile radio. If you live in
Arizona and your car is parked outside in the summer, when you get in you
car to drive home and talk on your local repeater, you already exausted your
heat budget. The Ic-7000 isn't the only model with heat issues. The 746 and
756 Pros had problems with an RF driver IC over heating. I repaired several
IC-706 MK3G's where the surface mounted 5v regulator usoldered itself
because it gets too hot.
The backlight circuit in the 746 and the 746pro will eventually burn out
when a dim setting is selected.

--- In ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com> , Mark Krotz
<mkrotz@...> wrote:

I never said anything about the IC7K replacing any model. I stated that
it was not the first radio Icom built. Icom, formerly known as Inoue
Communications of Japan, has been building radios for decades. I am
fairly certain they considered heat budgets in the design of the IC7K.
I've had mine since they first came out, and have never had any problem
with it.

Part of the heat budgeting is the responsibility of the user, in making
sure that the outside of the radio has proper ventilation, and that it
is operated within the specified operating temperature range.

If you care to research the list archives, you will find lots of
discussion from the past on this subject, some worth reviewing.


Mark


iamkf2ti <kf2ti@...>
 

I've been following the thread and even living in the north found that the 7000 would use up its "heat budget" relatively quickly in the summer. Being so adept at using a soldering iron (NOT), the internal modifications were something other people could do. I did recently find this on EBAY

http://cgi.ebay.com/Icom-IC-7000-Constant-Cooling-Fan-/360267495570?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item53e19db892

and purchased one

Sits on top of the main chassis and blows air into the body I was concerned about the power connection as I run a Turbo Tuner but after one month of regular use, including sitting in a hotel parking lot and calling cq for several hours, it works perfectly The radio stays cool despite keydowns of 4 minutes at a time

FWIW

Steve KF2TI

--- In ic7000@yahoogroups.com, "Harry Hoo" <HarryHoo@...> wrote:

....exhausted your "heat budget"???



From: ic7000@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
WA9FVP
Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2010 9:59 PM
To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main
board.





Mark,

Keep in mind that the radio is sold as a mobile radio. If you live in
Arizona and your car is parked outside in the summer, when you get in you
car to drive home and talk on your local repeater, you already exausted your
heat budget. The Ic-7000 isn't the only model with heat issues. The 746 and
756 Pros had problems with an RF driver IC over heating. I repaired several
IC-706 MK3G's where the surface mounted 5v regulator usoldered itself
because it gets too hot.
The backlight circuit in the 746 and the 746pro will eventually burn out
when a dim setting is selected.

--- In ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com> , Mark Krotz
<mkrotz@> wrote:

I never said anything about the IC7K replacing any model. I stated that
it was not the first radio Icom built. Icom, formerly known as Inoue
Communications of Japan, has been building radios for decades. I am
fairly certain they considered heat budgets in the design of the IC7K.
I've had mine since they first came out, and have never had any problem
with it.

Part of the heat budgeting is the responsibility of the user, in making
sure that the outside of the radio has proper ventilation, and that it
is operated within the specified operating temperature range.

If you care to research the list archives, you will find lots of
discussion from the past on this subject, some worth reviewing.


Mark





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Milverton M. Swire
 

Harry, are you saying that we all should be "contented" with our IC-7000 while waiting patiently for it's replacement from Icom?
Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

-----Original Message-----
From: "Harry Hoo" <HarryHoo@cox.net>
Date: Tue, 1 Jun 2010 22:17:12
To: <ic7000@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: RE: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main board.

Mark, I never stated this was Icom's first radio made.

I been purchasing Icom products and installing it's products for over two
decades.

The IC7000 is Icom's First design of its kind. I am certain if any relevant
design issues are realized by Icom from its warranty repair case histories,

any relevant issues (and other additional features) to be included in the
mk2 version or new model number that replaces the IC7K.

Sorry for any misconceptions from my previous post.





From: ic7000@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Mark Krotz
Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2010 9:44 PM
To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main
board.





I never said anything about the IC7K replacing any model. I stated that
it was not the first radio Icom built. Icom, formerly known as Inoue
Communications of Japan, has been building radios for decades. I am
fairly certain they considered heat budgets in the design of the IC7K.
I've had mine since they first came out, and have never had any problem
with it.

Part of the heat budgeting is the responsibility of the user, in making
sure that the outside of the radio has proper ventilation, and that it
is operated within the specified operating temperature range.

If you care to research the list archives, you will find lots of
discussion from the past on this subject, some worth reviewing.

Mark

On 6/1/2010 9:27 PM, Harry Hoo wrote:
Hi Mark,



Please inform me of Icom model the IC-7000 replaced, that has the power
and
some features and size of the IC-7000.



From: ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf
Of
Mark Krotz
Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2010 9:19 PM
To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main
board.





On 6/1/2010 9:10 PM, voiceswithinthehead wrote:


I can bet that the new model that recplaces the IC-7000 will have this
issue resolved.
This is not the first radio Icom has ever built. Nor is it the first
time the operating temp of the IC-7K has been debated.

M


Adrian <vk4tux@...>
 

Regarding the removal of the PA and Main board, I have done this to look
at the remote jack issue (no ci-v connection) I had, and I inadvertently
pulled J2004 ribbon cable from the PA board socket when disconnecting
from the main board ( not hard to do ), and hence had to remove the PA
board (de-soldering driver and coax connections required ) to get access
to refit the ribbon.

All back together and now unit will not power up (power ok into radio).
I think one of the ribbon connections may be damaged, and am trying to
source replacements for J2004 and J2005 S.CNR 28FLT-SM1-TB ribbon cable
connectors to cover what may be the issue I now have.

Any comments please from those having disassembled the radio in this
fashion are welcome. Not sure why Icom did not hard connect the PA end
of the ribbons to avoid this potential service problem, because without
a very special tool (If it exists) to reinsert the PA end of the ribbon
through a narrow front space, it is inevitable that the PA board needs
to removed to refit the ribbon(s)and then refitted
(& re-soldered) before testing repairs.

regards

Adrian

vk4tux


Chuck Schultz <wq5b@...>
 

That's E-Bay and the way ! Take an idea and a 50 cent fan and sell it to happy people for $30.00 plus shipping . Who says all the opputunities are gone ? Chuck

----- Original Message -----
From: iamkf2ti
To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, June 02, 2010 6:21 AM
Subject: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main board.



I've been following the thread and even living in the north found that the 7000 would use up its "heat budget" relatively quickly in the summer. Being so adept at using a soldering iron (NOT), the internal modifications were something other people could do. I did recently find this on EBAY

http://cgi.ebay.com/Icom-IC-7000-Constant-Cooling-Fan-/360267495570?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item53e19db892

and purchased one

Sits on top of the main chassis and blows air into the body I was concerned about the power connection as I run a Turbo Tuner but after one month of regular use, including sitting in a hotel parking lot and calling cq for several hours, it works perfectly The radio stays cool despite keydowns of 4 minutes at a time

FWIW

Steve KF2TI

--- In ic7000@yahoogroups.com, "Harry Hoo" <HarryHoo@...> wrote:
>
> ....exhausted your "heat budget"???
>
>
>
> From: ic7000@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
> WA9FVP
> Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2010 9:59 PM
> To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com
> Subject: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main
> board.
>
>
>
>
>
> Mark,
>
> Keep in mind that the radio is sold as a mobile radio. If you live in
> Arizona and your car is parked outside in the summer, when you get in you
> car to drive home and talk on your local repeater, you already exausted your
> heat budget. The Ic-7000 isn't the only model with heat issues. The 746 and
> 756 Pros had problems with an RF driver IC over heating. I repaired several
> IC-706 MK3G's where the surface mounted 5v regulator usoldered itself
> because it gets too hot.
> The backlight circuit in the 746 and the 746pro will eventually burn out
> when a dim setting is selected.
>
> --- In ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com> , Mark Krotz
> <mkrotz@> wrote:
> >
> > I never said anything about the IC7K replacing any model. I stated that
> > it was not the first radio Icom built. Icom, formerly known as Inoue
> > Communications of Japan, has been building radios for decades. I am
> > fairly certain they considered heat budgets in the design of the IC7K.
> > I've had mine since they first came out, and have never had any problem
> > with it.
> >
> > Part of the heat budgeting is the responsibility of the user, in making
> > sure that the outside of the radio has proper ventilation, and that it
> > is operated within the specified operating temperature range.
> >
> > If you care to research the list archives, you will find lots of
> > discussion from the past on this subject, some worth reviewing.
> >
> >
> > Mark
> >
> >
>
>
>
>
>
>
>


Harry Hoo <HarryHoo@...>
 

I do not tell anybody how they should be "contented" about anything.



From: ic7000@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
tnnyswy@yahoo.com
Sent: Wednesday, June 02, 2010 4:35 AM
To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main
board.





Harry, are you saying that we all should be "contented" with our IC-7000
while waiting patiently for it's replacement from Icom?
Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

-----Original Message-----
From: "Harry Hoo" <HarryHoo@cox.net <mailto:HarryHoo%40cox.net> >
Date: Tue, 1 Jun 2010 22:17:12
To: <ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com> >
Subject: RE: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main
board.

Mark, I never stated this was Icom's first radio made.

I been purchasing Icom products and installing it's products for over two
decades.

The IC7000 is Icom's First design of its kind. I am certain if any relevant
design issues are realized by Icom from its warranty repair case histories,

any relevant issues (and other additional features) to be included in the
mk2 version or new model number that replaces the IC7K.

Sorry for any misconceptions from my previous post.





From: ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf
Of
Mark Krotz
Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2010 9:44 PM
To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main
board.





I never said anything about the IC7K replacing any model. I stated that
it was not the first radio Icom built. Icom, formerly known as Inoue
Communications of Japan, has been building radios for decades. I am
fairly certain they considered heat budgets in the design of the IC7K.
I've had mine since they first came out, and have never had any problem
with it.

Part of the heat budgeting is the responsibility of the user, in making
sure that the outside of the radio has proper ventilation, and that it
is operated within the specified operating temperature range.

If you care to research the list archives, you will find lots of
discussion from the past on this subject, some worth reviewing.

Mark

On 6/1/2010 9:27 PM, Harry Hoo wrote:
Hi Mark,



Please inform me of Icom model the IC-7000 replaced, that has the power
and
some features and size of the IC-7000.



From: ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf
Of
Mark Krotz
Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2010 9:19 PM
To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main
board.





On 6/1/2010 9:10 PM, voiceswithinthehead wrote:


I can bet that the new model that recplaces the IC-7000 will have this
issue resolved.
This is not the first radio Icom has ever built. Nor is it the first
time the operating temp of the IC-7K has been debated.

M


Ed Thierbach <ethierba@...>
 

BTDT, to my amusement and embarrassment. I bought a "portable car cooler" to cool my pop-up for Field Day and public service events. Just add ice and a cigarette lighter socket. Turned out to be a big plastic cooler with a big hole cut out of the top. Poorly glued to the hole was a big 12V squirrel-cage type blower.

The following week, my camper was assigned Field Day duty as shelter for CW Station #2, and it was going to be a hot day. Since I had paid for the stupid cooler thing, I was going to use it, darn it. I loaded it up and turned it on -- the thunder drowned out all conversation, every loose paper blew to one end of the camper, and the poor CW op's hair was blowing around like he was an extra in "Twister". The look on his face was priceless, but not something I'm eager to induce again.

Don't use one of these to cool your IC-7000. :-)

73,
-Ed- AB8OJ

On Jun 2, 2010, at 8:16 AM, Chuck Schultz wrote:

That's E-Bay and the way ! Take an idea and a 50 cent fan and sell it to happy people for $30.00 plus shipping . Who says all the opputunities are gone ? Chuck
----- Original Message -----
From: iamkf2ti
To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, June 02, 2010 6:21 AM
Subject: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main board.



I've been following the thread and even living in the north found that the 7000 would use up its "heat budget" relatively quickly in the summer. Being so adept at using a soldering iron (NOT), the internal modifications were something other people could do. I did recently find this on EBAY

http://cgi.ebay.com/Icom-IC-7000-Constant-Cooling-Fan-/360267495570?cmd=ViewItem&pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item53e19db892

and purchased one

Sits on top of the main chassis and blows air into the body I was concerned about the power connection as I run a Turbo Tuner but after one month of regular use, including sitting in a hotel parking lot and calling cq for several hours, it works perfectly The radio stays cool despite keydowns of 4 minutes at a time

FWIW

Steve KF2TI

--- In ic7000@yahoogroups.com, "Harry Hoo" <HarryHoo@...> wrote:

....exhausted your "heat budget"???



From: ic7000@yahoogroups.com [mailto:ic7000@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
WA9FVP
Sent: Tuesday, June 01, 2010 9:59 PM
To: ic7000@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [IC-7000] Re: IC-7000 modification to reduce heat on the main
board.





Mark,

Keep in mind that the radio is sold as a mobile radio. If you live in
Arizona and your car is parked outside in the summer, when you get in you
car to drive home and talk on your local repeater, you already exausted your
heat budget. The Ic-7000 isn't the only model with heat issues. The 746 and
756 Pros had problems with an RF driver IC over heating. I repaired several
IC-706 MK3G's where the surface mounted 5v regulator usoldered itself
because it gets too hot.
The backlight circuit in the 746 and the 746pro will eventually burn out
when a dim setting is selected.

--- In ic7000@yahoogroups.com <mailto:ic7000%40yahoogroups.com> , Mark Krotz
<mkrotz@> wrote:

I never said anything about the IC7K replacing any model. I stated that
it was not the first radio Icom built. Icom, formerly known as Inoue
Communications of Japan, has been building radios for decades. I am
fairly certain they considered heat budgets in the design of the IC7K.
I've had mine since they first came out, and have never had any problem
with it.

Part of the heat budgeting is the responsibility of the user, in making
sure that the outside of the radio has proper ventilation, and that it
is operated within the specified operating temperature range.

If you care to research the list archives, you will find lots of
discussion from the past on this subject, some worth reviewing.


Mark





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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