Date   

Re: Help me fix my latest IC7000 failure

Dan Smith - KK7DS <dsmith@...>
 

Whilst I had the top cover off I applied a slight pressure to various places on the boards but in particular to the logic board. What I found was that by applying a firm pressure to the corner of the logic board that is nearest to the two ribbons (closest right hand side when looking from the front of the radio) the problem went away and the radio performed as it should. I then pulled off the logic board and cleaned the two sets of contacts underneath but to no avail. I will investigate further when time permits but for now I have placed a small piece of rubber on top of the logic board so that the cover, when screwed down, places some permanent pressure.
The radio is working well at the moment but I know that in time I will need to look for a dry joint, bad track or the likes on the boards in that area to make a permanent repair. At least for now I have my right arm back. I mention all this because you are open to looking for areas to poke - Good Luck -
Thanks, that's a good tip. Those ribbon cables seem like a disaster waiting to happen. I've now un-seated and re-seated them several times in the process of checking things on both sides of the main board and I can tell they won't tolerate much more of it. They're incredibly delicate, so I guess I shouldn't be surprised that the connectors are prone to failure as well :/

--Dan


Re: Help me fix my latest IC7000 failure

Dan Smith - KK7DS <dsmith@...>
 

Well, sorry to be that guy that replies to his own emails. Further analysis for the archives:

I think I've got it worked out. Initially I was assuming there was something on the logic board that was drawing down the 3.3v line. So, I tried feeding the regulator input directly with the logic board not seated in the main board. That worked fine, with the regulator output at 3.3v and the input holding where I was feeding it. So, I thought maybe it was something on the main board drawing it to ground between the logic board connector and the head connector. There was no path to ground between pin 2 on the head connector that I could measure, so I seated the logic board back in the main board, with the main DC power disconnected and direct-fed the regulator on the logic board again. With that, I got a solid 3.3v at the head connector. However, if I powered the unit through the main DC connector, I'd get the same deal: low regulator HV input line, low regulator output, and low voltage at the head connector.

This led to me to think there was a high resistance in the path feeding the HV line. With no load, it would measure 14v, but under load it would draw down. I traced that to the PA board, where the HV line passes through EP703 (RFI choke I think) and R723, which I assume is a current limiting resistor to protect the always-on HV line. Measuring in-circuit, the choke was zero ohms (as expected), and R723 measured 52 ohms. It's marked in the service manual as 4.7. So, I bypassed R723 with a big and ugly 1/4 watt resistor of the lowest value from my stash (10 ohm) and...IT WORKED.

I haven't done any more checking on things other than that it now powers up and seems to be okay otherwise, but hopefully that's it. So, I've got to replace the regulator I removed, and get real good at microsurgery real fast so I can replace R723.

Longer-term I need to figure out if I want to keep this thing around once I get it patched up. I love it, but it seems like a ticking time bomb.

Still happy to hear any commentary on this and the previous analysis. Maybe all the issues I've had have something in common and fixing that would help this thing live a long life?

--Dan

On Jul 11, 2021, at 13:46, Dan Smith - KK7DS via groups.io <dsmith@...> wrote:

Hi all,

I'm looking for some help with my IC7000. I apologize for being wordy, it's in my nature and I can't help it. I'll provide a little background, in case it's relevant. If not, just skip to the problem description.

=== Background ===

I've used it quite a bit off an on over the years, but we have a bit of a dysfunctional relationship. I used to use it for a lot of portable (early days of SOTA) work in all kinds of conditions. It never got really wet or anything, and doesn't show any corrosion anywhere, but it has been outside quite a bit. Many years ago, it started doing this thing where it would just go deaf (all HF bands at least) on and off. Like, it would be sitting there in RX, showing S5 background noise, then ... silent S0 for ten minutes or so, then back to S5 like nothing happened. No touching, no external stimulus. I made a private youtube video showing it happen, wrote up a bunch of diagnosis and details, and sent it to Icom. They called me back, saying that they couldn't reproduce the problem, refused to look at the video, and thus were just sending it back to me with the ribbon cables reseated. I was super frustrated with this response (it was actually worse than I describe), so when I got it back, I literally put it on a shelf. A couple years later, I pulled it out to use it and got just the click-click-of-death thing. Back on the shelf, but later I diagnosed the shorted tantalum cap in the head, replaced, and it would power up. Back on the shelf without much use. Recently got it back out, and spent a day working it pretty hard on several bands and was thrilled to have my old friend back. Until it let me down again. On to the problem description:

=== Problem Description ===

Yesterday while working it, it started to power off when I would transmit. At one point it got into a really weird reboot loop where the relay that clicks on when you power it up would click on and off, on and off whenever it had external power. Click, click, click .. until I pull the power cable. No head input would stop it. Left it unplugged for a while and then it powered back on normally. Worked it for another hour and then it shut off again during transmit -- for would be the last time. After this, I get no click-click when I hit the power button, no activity at all when it is given power. Just totally dead like a brick. No burning smell either, for what it's worth.

=== Diagnosis ===

After much pouring over the service manual and tracing things out inside, I arrived at the IC1251 3.3v regulator on the logic unit. This (AFAICT) takes the 14v HV line and regulates it down to 3.3v to power the CPU and is required for the PWRK circuit to initiate the startup. This regulator was showing about 2.7v on the input and 2.4v on the output leg. Confirmed on the head connector pin 2 (with the head detached) that it's sitting at 2.4v instead of what I would expect to be 3.3v. I can probe the HV line on the main board right by the connector that feeds the logic board, and see that it sits at 14v when the logic board is out, and drops to 3.7v or so with the logic board in place. This indicates to me that something on the logic board is pulling that down real far.

I did what I could to check the bypass caps along the input and output lines to that regulator, but they're, uh, real small and stuff. So, I decided that a sane course of action would be to pop the regulator out so I could isolate before and after it. I got it out clean (although I pulled a leg off it so I'll have to replace that at least). As soon as I did, the HV line went back up to 14v, so I was hopeful that the regulator was bad. However, I wedged a TO-220 3.3v regulator from my parts box into the spot just to test, and it does the same thing. Without the output leg of the regulator connected to the board, it sits at 3.3v and the input sits at 14v. When I connect it to the output pad, it drops down and pulls the input with it, just like the original one.

As I mentioned, I tried to check what I could that is downstream of that regulator, specifically bypass caps C1252, C1317, C1317 although the latter two are so dang small I have no idea if I'm really on them. But, they don't seem to be shorted, best I can tell. The battery diode D1301 seems fine, and the battery voltage is 3.1v. Other than that, I'm at a bit of a dead end.

I assume I'm correct that ~2.4v at the head connector and output of the regulator is too low, and that the input shouldn't be pulled down that low, if not for something drawing a lot of current. Is that correct?

What else could I reasonably do to poke? Wild guesses, as well as informed ones, are welcomed.

Thanks!

--Dan



Re: Help me fix my latest IC7000 failure

Hoffy
 

Hi Dan, I have recently had the need to pull my IC-7000 apart for a few different faults that have been creeping into the unit over time. My hand was forced when the dreaded "no click/no audio" problem would happen intermittently upon turning on the radio. I thought that I would pull out the boards on the upper deck to fix an old problem with the external speaker jack first as this was the easiest fix then reassemble the unit and see if the intermittent start up fault might have fixed itself due to something now perhaps making better contact during the operation.
   You probably have guessed that more gremlins came in than went out because the old ribbon cables were very brittle. I put the project on hold until I was able to get a full set of cables (plus some extra spares) from Digi-Key in the States. They were here in Australia in less than a week so I got back into the radio to see if the initial start up fault was still there and it was.
  Whilst I had the top cover off I applied a slight pressure to various places on the boards but in particular to the logic board. What I found was that by applying a firm pressure to the corner of the logic board that is nearest to the two ribbons (closest right hand side when looking from the front of the radio) the problem went away and the radio performed as it should. I then pulled off the logic board and cleaned the two sets of contacts underneath but to no avail. I will investigate further when time permits but for now I have placed a small piece of rubber on top of the logic board so that the cover, when screwed down, places some permanent pressure.
  The radio is working well at the moment but I know that in time I will need to look for a dry joint, bad track or the likes on the boards in that area to make a permanent repair. At least for now I have my right arm back. I mention all this because you are open to looking for areas to poke - Good Luck - 
Hoffy - VK4OY


Help me fix my latest IC7000 failure

Dan Smith - KK7DS <dsmith@...>
 

Hi all,

I'm looking for some help with my IC7000. I apologize for being wordy, it's in my nature and I can't help it. I'll provide a little background, in case it's relevant. If not, just skip to the problem description.

=== Background ===

I've used it quite a bit off an on over the years, but we have a bit of a dysfunctional relationship. I used to use it for a lot of portable (early days of SOTA) work in all kinds of conditions. It never got really wet or anything, and doesn't show any corrosion anywhere, but it has been outside quite a bit. Many years ago, it started doing this thing where it would just go deaf (all HF bands at least) on and off. Like, it would be sitting there in RX, showing S5 background noise, then ... silent S0 for ten minutes or so, then back to S5 like nothing happened. No touching, no external stimulus. I made a private youtube video showing it happen, wrote up a bunch of diagnosis and details, and sent it to Icom. They called me back, saying that they couldn't reproduce the problem, refused to look at the video, and thus were just sending it back to me with the ribbon cables reseated. I was super frustrated with this response (it was actually worse than I describe), so when I got it back, I literally put it on a shelf. A couple years later, I pulled it out to use it and got just the click-click-of-death thing. Back on the shelf, but later I diagnosed the shorted tantalum cap in the head, replaced, and it would power up. Back on the shelf without much use. Recently got it back out, and spent a day working it pretty hard on several bands and was thrilled to have my old friend back. Until it let me down again. On to the problem description:

=== Problem Description ===

Yesterday while working it, it started to power off when I would transmit. At one point it got into a really weird reboot loop where the relay that clicks on when you power it up would click on and off, on and off whenever it had external power. Click, click, click .. until I pull the power cable. No head input would stop it. Left it unplugged for a while and then it powered back on normally. Worked it for another hour and then it shut off again during transmit -- for would be the last time. After this, I get no click-click when I hit the power button, no activity at all when it is given power. Just totally dead like a brick. No burning smell either, for what it's worth.

=== Diagnosis ===

After much pouring over the service manual and tracing things out inside, I arrived at the IC1251 3.3v regulator on the logic unit. This (AFAICT) takes the 14v HV line and regulates it down to 3.3v to power the CPU and is required for the PWRK circuit to initiate the startup. This regulator was showing about 2.7v on the input and 2.4v on the output leg. Confirmed on the head connector pin 2 (with the head detached) that it's sitting at 2.4v instead of what I would expect to be 3.3v. I can probe the HV line on the main board right by the connector that feeds the logic board, and see that it sits at 14v when the logic board is out, and drops to 3.7v or so with the logic board in place. This indicates to me that something on the logic board is pulling that down real far.

I did what I could to check the bypass caps along the input and output lines to that regulator, but they're, uh, real small and stuff. So, I decided that a sane course of action would be to pop the regulator out so I could isolate before and after it. I got it out clean (although I pulled a leg off it so I'll have to replace that at least). As soon as I did, the HV line went back up to 14v, so I was hopeful that the regulator was bad. However, I wedged a TO-220 3.3v regulator from my parts box into the spot just to test, and it does the same thing. Without the output leg of the regulator connected to the board, it sits at 3.3v and the input sits at 14v. When I connect it to the output pad, it drops down and pulls the input with it, just like the original one.

As I mentioned, I tried to check what I could that is downstream of that regulator, specifically bypass caps C1252, C1317, C1317 although the latter two are so dang small I have no idea if I'm really on them. But, they don't seem to be shorted, best I can tell. The battery diode D1301 seems fine, and the battery voltage is 3.1v. Other than that, I'm at a bit of a dead end.

I assume I'm correct that ~2.4v at the head connector and output of the regulator is too low, and that the input shouldn't be pulled down that low, if not for something drawing a lot of current. Is that correct?

What else could I reasonably do to poke? Wild guesses, as well as informed ones, are welcomed.

Thanks!

--Dan


Re: AH4 Tuner Use

Rick Robinson
 

Oh, this info is from personal experience and Icom service.

On Fri, Jul 2, 2021 at 11:01 AM Rick Robinson via groups.io <rickw8zt=gmail.com@groups.io> wrote:
Look in the bottom right corner of the circuit board where the cables enter, be careful of the screws in the top cover. There is a small black plastic computer style jumper that may have worked loose. It is not a standard size jumper. They may work loose. Either spread the pins a small amount or , as I did, wrap some wire around the two pins and apply a drop of solder to each. This is a test point for the factory. I used a clipped lead from a resistor to jumper the pins. J5 is the one. Check for other being loose but this is likely your problem.




--
Rick Genesis 1-29

--
Rick Genesis 1-29


Re: AH4 Tuner Use

Rick Robinson
 

Look in the bottom right corner of the circuit board where the cables enter, be careful of the screws in the top cover. There is a small black plastic computer style jumper that may have worked loose. It is not a standard size jumper. They may work loose. Either spread the pins a small amount or , as I did, wrap some wire around the two pins and apply a drop of solder to each. This is a test point for the factory. I used a clipped lead from a resistor to jumper the pins. J5 is the one. Check for other being loose but this is likely your problem.




--
Rick Genesis 1-29


Re: AH4 Tuner Use

Glenn Jensen
 

Hi Deon,

I have a AH-4 that I use with both my 706mk2g and my 7000.  You may have already tried these steps.

 

73’s – Glenn

 

 

Per the manual (7000):

 

And in the software (Menus on rig)

INSTRUCTION MANUAL - Icom America

 

 

 

 

From: ic7000@groups.io <ic7000@groups.io> On Behalf Of deonrfi@...
Sent: Friday, July 2, 2021 4:23 AM
To: ic7000@groups.io
Subject: [ic7000] AH4 Tuner Use

 

Hi all, I am Deon ZS6RFI from South Africa.
I seem to have a problem to get my AH$ tuner working on my IC7000.
Is there any specific tricks to set up the tuner menus and so on I have tried some of the tuner settings on the radio but the tuner does not work at all.  It used to work quite well with my old IC706 MKIIG but no luck on the IC7000. 

I need some help.

Regards

Deon (ZS6RFI) 


Re: AH4 Tuner Use

Max
 

If you have double checked the setup in the manual and it still doesn't work I would check continuity on all the wires from the plug all the way to the inside of your tuner. Search for the pin out of the tuner connector on the radio and verify that you have 12v available. Failing all that, you would have to start looking at the two signal lines at the tuner connector. Do you still have the 706? if you do, try and verify operation.

I have both the 7000 and 706 and didn't have any issues best I remember, but that has been years ago. My 7000 TX always shows a high SWR now so I can not do any checks to help you, sorry. But if I do remember anything I post back, good luck.

Max KG4PID

On Friday, July 2, 2021, 06:59:57 AM CDT, deonrfi@... <deonrfi@...> wrote:


Hi all, I am Deon ZS6RFI from South Africa.
I seem to have a problem to get my AH$ tuner working on my IC7000.
Is there any specific tricks to set up the tuner menus and so on I have tried some of the tuner settings on the radio but the tuner does not work at all.  It used to work quite well with my old IC706 MKIIG but no luck on the IC7000. 

I need some help.

Regards

Deon (ZS6RFI) 


AH4 Tuner Use

deonrfi@...
 

Hi all, I am Deon ZS6RFI from South Africa.
I seem to have a problem to get my AH$ tuner working on my IC7000.
Is there any specific tricks to set up the tuner menus and so on I have tried some of the tuner settings on the radio but the tuner does not work at all.  It used to work quite well with my old IC706 MKIIG but no luck on the IC7000. 

I need some help.

Regards

Deon (ZS6RFI) 


Re: receive audio cutting out

Charles & Sandra Cohen <cpcohen1945@...>
 

I'm working from memory (which is unreliable), but here's something to explore:

The IC-7000 may have a feature called "Voice Squelch".  It's unrelated to "RF Squelch", which is sensitive to signal strength.

"Voice Squelch" squelches the audio when it perceives that the audio doesn't seem to be someone speaking.  It is often wrong in its judgement.

. . . Make sure that Voice Squelch is _off_, for normal ham operating.

.  Charles / va7cpc


Re: receive audio cutting out

Doug Stewart
 

Thanks for all the suggestions. I will check the VSC first, I thought I did eliminate that but I will double check. The radio does not have the head remoted yet, that’s a little later. Need to get my antenna mount figured out first.

 

Will update later.

 

73

Doug

N2BEG

 

From: ic7000@groups.io <ic7000@groups.io> On Behalf Of Dan Fisher AI4GK via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, June 29, 2021 10:10 AM
To: ic7000@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ic7000] receive audio cutting out

 


[ Warning: External Source Email ]

I'm wondering if your voice squelch was activated. Look on the right side, I think, for a button labeled VSC. also look for that in the display. My 7000 is in my truck and I'm inside, so I'm shooting from memory, here.

 

73,

 

Dan AI4GK


Re: receive audio cutting out

Dan Fisher AI4GK
 

I'm wondering if your voice squelch was activated. Look on the right side, I think, for a button labeled VSC. also look for that in the display. My 7000 is in my truck and I'm inside, so I'm shooting from memory, here.

73,

Dan AI4GK


Re: receive audio cutting out

Steve W3AHL
 

Check the Voice Squelch Control (VSC) function on manual page 82 (PDF page 91).

Steve, W3AHL


Re: receive audio cutting out

N3EA
 

Doug,
Make sure that the Voice Squelch Control circuit is turned OFF. See if your display says "VSC" on it and if it does turn it off. I think it's page 84 of the manual.
I run my RF Gain/Squelch set to "auto" as I just kind of like it that way.

Hope this helps and just something to try before you start looking for cold solder joints and stuff.

73,

Al, N3EA


Re: receive audio cutting out

MICHAEL WILDER
 

Doug,

I had a similar issue with mine, and I discovered by accident when preparing to install the radio in my vehicle, that the audio jack on the side of the head unit had bad solder joint on inductor L251.  I tried plugging an external speaker into the side jack during one of those times when the radio audio had cut out, to discover that I still did not have any audio.  But as I pulled the phono jack partially back out, I did have audio.
It took me a  while to narrow it down due to the schematic in the manual I downloaded didn't match my circuit board. It wasn't until one of the HAMs (sorry, I don't remember his call sign) mentioned that there is an addendum to the manual, which did match my board.

Just a word of caution, the circuit board and traces will only tolerate so much heat, so use the smallest solder tip you can find and apply minimal heat.

Below is the joint that I had found to be my issue.

I hope this helps,

Mike
WZ4CTX

73's

Inline image
    
 


On Tuesday, June 29, 2021, 06:49:13 AM CDT, Doug Stewart <dstewart@...> wrote:


Hi all,

I ran my IC-7000 for field day and rediscovered an old issue (I don’t use it that often but plan to install it in my truck soon). I had the audio keep cutting out on receive on SSB on all bands. 20m seems to be worse but it happened on all bands. I would be receiving a solid station and the squelch would suddenly drop out and no adjustment of the RF gain would bring him back.  Then it would just pop back on. I tried all combinations of menu settings for the RF gain/squelch and AGC settings to no avail. It was very annoying so I went to CW for the most part and had no issues there. Anyone have any suggestions?

 

Thanks,

Doug

N2BEG


receive audio cutting out

Doug Stewart
 

Hi all,

I ran my IC-7000 for field day and rediscovered an old issue (I don’t use it that often but plan to install it in my truck soon). I had the audio keep cutting out on receive on SSB on all bands. 20m seems to be worse but it happened on all bands. I would be receiving a solid station and the squelch would suddenly drop out and no adjustment of the RF gain would bring him back.  Then it would just pop back on. I tried all combinations of menu settings for the RF gain/squelch and AGC settings to no avail. It was very annoying so I went to CW for the most part and had no issues there. Anyone have any suggestions?

 

Thanks,

Doug

N2BEG


Re: Intermitten tx

VK3SQ - Geoff
 

Thanks Steve for that information and link, a great help.

73 de Geoff vk3sq


Re: Intermitten tx

Linda C <lculberson@...>
 

Steve W3AHL,
I’ve been following this thread because I’ve had the same problem with a used IC7000 I bought several years ago. I bought a replacement mic (off of eBay, which was probably stupid) just to find it had the exact same issue. I think now that maybe it was one of the original faulty ones that Icom pulled. Who knows.

I’m looking forward to trying the fix you’re talking about as soon as I can replace the antennas a tornado got.

Thanks for the info and thanks to all for the thread

73,
Linda AG5HJ

On Jun 26, 2021, at 9:48 AM, Steve W3AHL <w3ahl@...> wrote:

SKQJLAA010


Re: Intermitten tx

Mike
 

I tried back mic jack....very weird...works better but only if I turn vox on... I am really confused by the issue and if it is hardware of software related, I didn't have time to torture shoot too much I will tonight. If vox is off it seems to not be in tx although now I get the led on the mic.... 


On Sat, Jun 26, 2021, 10:48 AM Steve W3AHL <w3ahl@...> wrote:
The original PTT switch used in the HM-151 mic'swas not sealed and had a cheap actuator design.  Icom started shipping a better sealed switch for repair parts in 2007 I think.  It was an ALPS SKQJLBA010, available from Mouser.com, although it is currently backordered, but they have SKQJLAA010 in stock, which is identical except with a black instead of gray actuator stem.

https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Alps-Alpine/SKQJLAA010?qs=%2Fha2pyFaduiNCIVDxt%252BQU%2F5bP%252BmBGtzmFC3u3iEdhgc%3D

The switch is easy to replace, however it is important to observe the manufacturer's soldering instructions, available in the datasheet on Mouser's web site at the link above.  It specifies a maximum soldering iron tip temperature of 350 degrees C, using no more than a 20 watt iron applied for a maximum of 3 seconds to each lead.  Exceeding these limits can cause the aluminum snap disk inside the switch to oxidize and cause premature failure or intermittent operation.

Since the old switch is not sealed it can often be "repaired" temporarily by squirting a good quality contact cleaner such as Deoxit 5 into the switch and repeatedly pushing the plunger to help clean the oxidation.  However, the switch should be replaced soon after it is cleaned.  The new switches are sealed and cannot be cleaned.

Steve, W3AHL


Re: Intermitten tx

Steve W3AHL
 

The original PTT switch used in the HM-151 mic'swas not sealed and had a cheap actuator design.  Icom started shipping a better sealed switch for repair parts in 2007 I think.  It was an ALPS SKQJLBA010, available from Mouser.com, although it is currently backordered, but they have SKQJLAA010 in stock, which is identical except with a black instead of gray actuator stem.

https://www.mouser.com/ProductDetail/Alps-Alpine/SKQJLAA010?qs=%2Fha2pyFaduiNCIVDxt%252BQU%2F5bP%252BmBGtzmFC3u3iEdhgc%3D

The switch is easy to replace, however it is important to observe the manufacturer's soldering instructions, available in the datasheet on Mouser's web site at the link above.  It specifies a maximum soldering iron tip temperature of 350 degrees C, using no more than a 20 watt iron applied for a maximum of 3 seconds to each lead.  Exceeding these limits can cause the aluminum snap disk inside the switch to oxidize and cause premature failure or intermittent operation.

Since the old switch is not sealed it can often be "repaired" temporarily by squirting a good quality contact cleaner such as Deoxit 5 into the switch and repeatedly pushing the plunger to help clean the oxidation.  However, the switch should be replaced soon after it is cleaned.  The new switches are sealed and cannot be cleaned.

Steve, W3AHL

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