Date   

Re: Close Proximity

D C *Mac* Macdonald
 

I consider it mandatory for EVERY transmitter at a Field Day site use the appropriate bandpass filter at all times.  Mr Sherwood will tell you that almost every transmitter or transceiver has broadband noise coming out of it.  At our Field Day operation this year, there was a brand new transceiver that put out wipeout level noise on 20, 15, and 10 meters whenever it was keyed up on 6m SSB even without any modulation!
 
73 de Mac, K2GKK/5​
Since 30 Nov 1953​
Oklahoma City, OK​
USAF, Retired ('61-'81)​
FAA, Retired ('94-'10)​
 


Re: Close Proximity

Paul Hansen
 

Ken,

              I repair 3 or 4 radios per week that have been damaged from RF overload. Most are HF radios. VHF and UHF radios are not immune. What’s worse, the radios do not have to be turned on to be damaged. RF will damage the small switching and amplifier components regardless of being energized. Your VHF installation is very much like many marine installations I repair. Larger charter boats like to have redundant VHF radios. The antennas are frequently mounted on stanchions or rails around the flying bridge. Separation is often less than 15 feet. The first FET RF amplifier gets damaged and receiver sensitivity decreases by about 20db. The only way to prevent this from happening is either removing the antenna from the least used radio or installing a lock out relay.

              HF radios are similarly damaged but the antenna separation distances can be much greater. A pair of verticals separated by 100 feet can be mutually destructive if a linear amplifier is involved. Normally, RF overload damage in HF radios is much more expensive to repair because the RF takes out TX/RX switching, band pass filter selection diodes, attenuator resistors, and small RF amplifiers (even transmit amplifiers). Again, turning the radio off isn’t going to do the job. The antenna has to be grounded or disconnected.

              Here’s another thing I see all the time. You have an IC-7000 set up to run HF through 6 meters on an antenna system. Then you have a nice 2 meter gain antenna mounted on top of your HF antenna or right next to it. What could be wrong with that? HF won’t bother your VHF receiver, will it? Because your IC-7000 has an antenna connector for HF through 6 and one for VHF and UHF an odd problem crops up. You run a bunch of summer sporadic E on 6 meters. Then you find your 2 meter receiver is not working well any longer. Why? The third harmonic of 6 meters is right in the pass band of the 2 meter front end and it has enough energy to cause damage to it. As far as RF energy is concerned, three times six equals two. I see a couple of these per month.

              I hope that covers what you want to know. Disconnect your unused radios until you can develop a lock out switching system. A manual grounding antenna switch is ok but it relies on you remembering to use it. If you run power on HF, a typical non-grounding antenna switch isn’t good enough.

 

Thank You

 

Paul W. Hansen, W6XA

Amateur Radio Service

2134 Carthage Road

Tucker, GA 30084

(864) 222-3539

www.amateurradioservice.com

 

From: ic7000@groups.io [mailto:ic7000@groups.io] On Behalf Of Ken Campbell
Sent: Friday, August 23, 2019 11:22 AM
To: ic7000@groups.io
Subject: [ic7000] Close Proximity

 

Hi all,
I’m wondering if any of you  have had issues with antenna  close proximity? I run an ic-7300 on HF and have my ic-7000 set up to use mostly on VHF/UHF. My antennas are quite close to each other as we live in a townhouse, less than 10 feet apart. Normally I don’t run both radios simultaneously. If I were to do that, does anyone think that could be a problem, as in doing damage to either radio? Would really appreciate your thoughts on this. Thanks! :-)

All the best,
Ken N6PCD


Repair IC-7000 parts

James Fisher
 

I am about to send in my IC-7000 in for a repair.
The speaker jack needs replacing [rear].  This is the only problem.
I am also thinking about having the ON/Off switch replaced , although it works fine. It has had a lot of use.
Is there anything else I should have replaced ?
I am thinking of sending it to Burqhardt's. I live in MT. Is there any other place I should consider sending it to for repair ?
I will also have them check it over for spec's [freq, etc] as long as they have it.  
Thanks
James


Re: Close Proximity

Den W2DEN
 

You can damage a receiver's front end, and more, with high levels of RF. I am not an expert on RF levels but something to keep in mind.
From Field Day and contesting experience you may want to look into band pass filters if you intend on operating two HF radios in close proximity.
73 Den


Re: Close Proximity

Helmut Wabnig
 

On Fri, 23 Aug 2019 08:21:56 -0700, you wrote:

Hi all,
I’m wondering if any of you  have had issues with antenna  close proximity? I run an ic-7300 on HF and have my ic-7000 set up to use mostly on VHF/UHF. My antennas are quite close to each other as we live in a townhouse, less than 10 feet apart. Normally I don’t run both radios simultaneously. If I were to do that, does anyone think that could be a problem, as in doing damage to either radio? Would really appreciate your thoughts on this. Thanks! :-)

All the best,
Ken N6PCD
Although I should have known better, I destroyed two LED lamps,
one 2 meter amateur transceiver inclusive its power supply,
and one laptop computer with all the software on it.

By transmitting in near proximity.

OE8UWW


Close Proximity

Ken Campbell <n6pcd1@...>
 

Hi all,
I’m wondering if any of you  have had issues with antenna  close proximity? I run an ic-7300 on HF and have my ic-7000 set up to use mostly on VHF/UHF. My antennas are quite close to each other as we live in a townhouse, less than 10 feet apart. Normally I don’t run both radios simultaneously. If I were to do that, does anyone think that could be a problem, as in doing damage to either radio? Would really appreciate your thoughts on this. Thanks! :-)

All the best,
Ken N6PCD


Re: Question on COMpression meter

Phillip Potter
 

I got to looking at the display again, only to find that it was the ALC meter!!!  Not the COMpression meter. Back to manual...

Phil


Question on COMpression meter

Phillip Potter
 

Hi all,
So, while I was on vacation, my Diamond SG-7900 dual-band antenna fell apart!  The whip came off with parts, I'm sure, bouncing on the roadway, while I merrily sped away, totally ignorant! I spent some time today rebuilding the antenna and testing it.  Everything fell into order with it and a quick check with an antenna analyzer proved it to be true.

What has me stumped a bit, is that when I was transmitting on 2M FM I noticed that the COM (compression) meter was one segment into the red and occasionally two segments into the red. I started looking through the manual, BUT never found anything about the COM meter as relates to FM, but did find the microphone setting section which did. Does that mean that I need to lower the gain on my microphone to bring the COM meter out of the red, even though COM doesn't show on the display and can't be enabled (AFAIK)?

It has been pretty hot here, so maybe I have heat exhaustion, or some such...LOL!

Phil


Re: IC-7000 2 Meter Rpt Problem Transmit but doesn't open the repeater ?

Kurt Sweeny
 

Rowland,
The final answer was cockpit error: not being in FM/Tone mode as opposed to FM. ‘Had fun looking at waveforms on the SDR dongle and comparing my old FY-530 to the 7000.
Thanks to all for the interest and helpful advice.
Kurt
KD6LZV


On Aug 7, 2019, at 12:00 AM, Roeland Jansen, PA3MET <roeland.jansen69@...> wrote:

and what was the final verdict?


Re: IC-7000 2 Meter Rpt Problem Transmit but doesn't open the repeater ?

Roeland Jansen, PA3MET
 

and what was the final verdict?


Re: IC 7000 Quit - Now alive and well!

Bill M
 

By now this is well off topic...but I must say the packages I saw will do many antennas. A little goes a long way. 
Bill W2CQ


Re: IC 7000 Quit - Now alive and well!

Rick Robinson <w8zt@...>
 

Fel Pro copper based anti seize, sold on amazon for around 10-15, depending on size. tubing,battery's ,ground rods. Anything you want to prevent from oxidizing.

On 8/5/2019 10:20 AM, Bill M wrote:
Yes it’s NOALOX. I’m traveling and using my iPhone to respond. Spell check played havoc with it and I had to retype it several times hi. 

 And yes it gets on everything. But it works to perfection on joints. I recently disassembled some elements over 25 years old and they slid apart easily. 

I looked at what Amazon is selling and the branded product seems to be very expensive. I’m sure someone can come up with a less expensive version to buy. My small pint is 30 years old and haven’t bought it in a while hi.
73,
-- 
Rick, W8ZT
WVDXA

Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: IC 7000 Quit - Now alive and well!

Bill M
 

Yes it’s NOALOX. I’m traveling and using my iPhone to respond. Spell check played havoc with it and I had to retype it several times hi. 

 And yes it gets on everything. But it works to perfection on joints. I recently disassembled some elements over 25 years old and they slid apart easily. 

I looked at what Amazon is selling and the branded product seems to be very expensive. I’m sure someone can come up with a less expensive version to buy. My small pint is 30 years old and haven’t bought it in a while hi.
73,


Re: IC 7000 Quit - Now alive and well!

Doug Neal
 

Mac:
Sounds like what I looking for the antennas, I will seek some out before the bad weather starts and my antenna exploits
are ended for the year.
73 de doug


On Sun, Aug 4, 2019 at 2:11 PM D C *Mac* Macdonald <k2gkk@...> wrote:
No Aluminum Oxidation!

I've assembled Mosley (and other) antennas using the Noalox and Penetrox for years (since 1963).  They disassemble and reassemble easily, even after many years in the air!  I believe the stuff is basically powdered aluminum in a petroleum jelly base.  And yes, it is a pain to get it off your fingers, hands, and clothes!

DX Engineering sells a similar product that seems to substitute powdered copper for the powdered aluminum.  That will also do the job.
 
73 de Mac, K2GKK/5​
Since 30 Nov 1953​
Oklahoma City, OK​
USAF, Retired ('61-'81)​
FAA, Retired ('94-'10)​
 



From: ic7000@groups.io <ic7000@groups.io> on behalf of jadief@... via Groups.Io <jadief=reagan.com@groups.io>
Sent: Sunday, August 4, 2019 09:36
To: ic7000@groups.io <ic7000@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ic7000] IC 7000 Quit - Now alive and well!
 

"NOALOX" - No Aluminum Oxide

 

Originally designed for Al-Cu (aluminum-copper) electrical outlets, etc., that were used with aluminum electrical wire & copper-plated electrical outlets & wall switches (etc.) to prevent oxide-created issues.

 

jd, K1TLV

 

 

-----Original Message-----

From: "Helmut Wabnig" <hwabnig@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 4, 2019 9:21am
To: ic7000@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ic7000] IC 7000 Quit - Now alive and well!

On Sun, 04 Aug 2019 06:57:30 -0700, you wrote:

>NOALUX
>Bill W2CQ
>


It's NOALOX, right?
That one is on Amazon.


Meanwhile I searched for it. Did not know this product before.
Is based on petroleum oil,
added some organic oil with hardener I suppose
(Like some ordinary laque) or is it rather like a grease?
and contains fine zinc powder they say.

Very interesting thing. Normally zinc and copper eat each other
electrolytically, but the laque encapsulates the contact points.
I wonder ablout that.

I will order one and try it out,
thank you for the information.

OE8UWW




Re: IC 7000 Quit - Now alive and well!

D C *Mac* Macdonald
 

No Aluminum Oxidation!

I've assembled Mosley (and other) antennas using the Noalox and Penetrox for years (since 1963).  They disassemble and reassemble easily, even after many years in the air!  I believe the stuff is basically powdered aluminum in a petroleum jelly base.  And yes, it is a pain to get it off your fingers, hands, and clothes!

DX Engineering sells a similar product that seems to substitute powdered copper for the powdered aluminum.  That will also do the job.
 
73 de Mac, K2GKK/5​
Since 30 Nov 1953​
Oklahoma City, OK​
USAF, Retired ('61-'81)​
FAA, Retired ('94-'10)​
 



From: ic7000@groups.io <ic7000@groups.io> on behalf of jadief@... via Groups.Io <jadief@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 4, 2019 09:36
To: ic7000@groups.io <ic7000@groups.io>
Subject: Re: [ic7000] IC 7000 Quit - Now alive and well!
 

"NOALOX" - No Aluminum Oxide

 

Originally designed for Al-Cu (aluminum-copper) electrical outlets, etc., that were used with aluminum electrical wire & copper-plated electrical outlets & wall switches (etc.) to prevent oxide-created issues.

 

jd, K1TLV

 

 

-----Original Message-----

From: "Helmut Wabnig" <hwabnig@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 4, 2019 9:21am
To: ic7000@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ic7000] IC 7000 Quit - Now alive and well!

On Sun, 04 Aug 2019 06:57:30 -0700, you wrote:

>NOALUX
>Bill W2CQ
>


It's NOALOX, right?
That one is on Amazon.


Meanwhile I searched for it. Did not know this product before.
Is based on petroleum oil,
added some organic oil with hardener I suppose
(Like some ordinary laque) or is it rather like a grease?
and contains fine zinc powder they say.

Very interesting thing. Normally zinc and copper eat each other
electrolytically, but the laque encapsulates the contact points.
I wonder ablout that.

I will order one and try it out,
thank you for the information.

OE8UWW




Re: IC 7000 Quit - Now alive and well!

Doug Neal
 

Hi Bill:
Lots of great and useful info going via this group. I will look for that Noalux product
Thanks
73 de Doug


Re: IC 7000 Quit - Now alive and well!

jadief@reagan.com
 

"NOALOX" - No Aluminum Oxide

 

Originally designed for Al-Cu (aluminum-copper) electrical outlets, etc., that were used with aluminum electrical wire & copper-plated electrical outlets & wall switches (etc.) to prevent oxide-created issues.

 

jd, K1TLV

 

 

-----Original Message-----

From: "Helmut Wabnig" <hwabnig@...>
Sent: Sunday, August 4, 2019 9:21am
To: ic7000@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ic7000] IC 7000 Quit - Now alive and well!

On Sun, 04 Aug 2019 06:57:30 -0700, you wrote:

>NOALUX
>Bill W2CQ
>


It's NOALOX, right?
That one is on Amazon.


Meanwhile I searched for it. Did not know this product before.
Is based on petroleum oil,
added some organic oil with hardener I suppose
(Like some ordinary laque) or is it rather like a grease?
and contains fine zinc powder they say.

Very interesting thing. Normally zinc and copper eat each other
electrolytically, but the laque encapsulates the contact points.
I wonder ablout that.

I will order one and try it out,
thank you for the information.

OE8UWW




Re: IC 7000 Quit - Now alive and well!

 

I use a similar product to when assembling antennas here in Florida.
Often you have to take everything apart, clean, brighten, slather messy stuff on, reassemble.
Repeat as necessary.
I brought two DX77A verticals back to life doing this.
I bought two from a ham who did not do this and sold them for scrap at a hamfest!
$10.00 for them and an AV12AVQ vertical as well.
I tunes one for the CW and digital end of the bands and the other for the phone.
They work well with my IC7000s 


Re: IC 7000 Quit - Now alive and well!

Helmut Wabnig
 

On Sun, 04 Aug 2019 06:57:30 -0700, you wrote:

NOALUX
Bill W2CQ

It's NOALOX, right?
That one is on Amazon.


Meanwhile I searched for it. Did not know this product before.
Is based on petroleum oil,
added some organic oil with hardener I suppose
(Like some ordinary laque) or is it rather like a grease?
and contains fine zinc powder they say.

Very interesting thing. Normally zinc and copper eat each other
electrolytically, but the laque encapsulates the contact points.
I wonder ablout that.

I will order one and try it out,
thank you for the information.

OE8UWW


Re: IC 7000 Quit - Now alive and well!

Helmut Wabnig
 

On Sun, 04 Aug 2019 06:57:30 -0700, you wrote:

I live near the ocean in South Florida on a salt water canal. All in our local DX Club the SFDXA have long ago solved the aluminum corrosion issue. We use NOALUX. Check your local Grainger or buy it online. Power company uses it on their ground connections.
Bill W2CQ

It's NOALOX, right?
That one is on Amazon.

W.

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