Date   

Re: Anyone with experience with the ALC circuit?

 

As I understand the circuit a voltage of about 2.8 volts is derived from R1641 and R1636 two 2.2 megohm resistors in series.
The several modifiers of the voltage to reduce the voltage to the IF pull that voltage down when the op amps voltage drops from 7 volts and bias diodes D1606 - 1608.
I think that the FET Q1606 is controlled by the UNSB line from the logic CPU and this bypasses the network of R1626 and R1634  through D1610, if that makes sense. Q1606, when turned on connects R1627 in parallel with R 1641 and 1636.
When not turned on the diode D1610 provides the voltage at the junction of R1626 and R1634 at about 1/3 of the 8 volt buss or 3.1 volts.
Either way Q1606 controls the ALC base voltage and the amount of drop when current is drawn. The voltages are close either way on my working radio.
In my radio the ALC line is pulled hard down when UNSB goes low. Next I will try changing Q1606 as I think that it is letting the line which goes to UNSB pull the ALC voltage down because perhaps the FET is "Leaking" the ALC voltage to ground through this line.
And thoughts on this?
I have included a pdf of the main board ALC circuit for those who are masochists and want to follow along 


Re: IC7000 remote socket

Tony Levitt
 

Hi,

I understand now pin 3 must be for HF linear operation and 3+7 for VHF/UHF.

I have used CI-V and the ptt works on HF 2+70 but have a comms problem it fails after a few operations saying that it can not read the frequency so I abandoned that approach.

73s

G4EFX

On 16/02/2019 09:31, Branko wrote:
Hello,
Maybe I was not precise enough. I use ACC 13 pin DIN socket . For VHF and UHV band need to connect pin 3 and pin 7 for PTT .
Pin 3 is for operation up to 50 MHz and pin 7 is for 2m and 70cm work.
Pin 3 and pin 7 need to be connected !!!
73!
9a2mw

sub, 16. velj 2019. u 09:11 Tony Levitt <g4efxmobile@...> napisao je:

Thanks Robin I will have to make a new lead and give it a try.

Tony G4EFX

On 15/02/2019 20:02, Robin Williams wrote:
I think you have to use the 6 pin socket to get ptt on vhf/uhf 
Cheers.
Robin zl3rew

On Sat, 16 Feb 2019 01:49 <g4efxmobile@... wrote:
Am using the 7000 for FT8 and using the accessory socket to interface to the pc via a commercial interface lead (am not using CI-V) everything works on all the HF bands including 50Mhz
no problems but the ptt is not working on VHF/UHF have checked all the menu setting but can't find an option to enable/disable on VHF/UHF

Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: IC7000 remote socket

Branko <9a2mw.branko@...>
 

Hello,
Maybe I was not precise enough. I use ACC 13 pin DIN socket . For VHF and UHV band need to connect pin 3 and pin 7 for PTT .
Pin 3 is for operation up to 50 MHz and pin 7 is for 2m and 70cm work.
Pin 3 and pin 7 need to be connected !!!
73!
9a2mw

sub, 16. velj 2019. u 09:11 Tony Levitt <g4efxmobile@...> napisao je:

Thanks Robin I will have to make a new lead and give it a try.

Tony G4EFX

On 15/02/2019 20:02, Robin Williams wrote:
I think you have to use the 6 pin socket to get ptt on vhf/uhf 
Cheers.
Robin zl3rew

On Sat, 16 Feb 2019 01:49 <g4efxmobile@... wrote:
Am using the 7000 for FT8 and using the accessory socket to interface to the pc via a commercial interface lead (am not using CI-V) everything works on all the HF bands including 50Mhz
no problems but the ptt is not working on VHF/UHF have checked all the menu setting but can't find an option to enable/disable on VHF/UHF

Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: IC7000 remote socket

Tony Levitt
 

Thanks Branko that's fixed the problem!

Best 73's

Tony G4EFX

On 15/02/2019 14:31, Branko wrote:
Hello,
Connect pin 7 and pin3 for  PTT function on VHF and UHF!

VY 73
9a2mw - Branko

pet, 15. velj 2019. u 13:49 <g4efxmobile@...> napisao je:
Am using the 7000 for FT8 and using the accessory socket to interface to the pc via a commercial interface lead (am not using CI-V) everything works on all the HF bands including 50Mhz
no problems but the ptt is not working on VHF/UHF have checked all the menu setting but can't find an option to enable/disable on VHF/UHF

Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: IC7000 remote socket

Tony Levitt
 

Thanks Robin I will have to make a new lead and give it a try.

Tony G4EFX

On 15/02/2019 20:02, Robin Williams wrote:
I think you have to use the 6 pin socket to get ptt on vhf/uhf 
Cheers.
Robin zl3rew

On Sat, 16 Feb 2019 01:49 <g4efxmobile@... wrote:
Am using the 7000 for FT8 and using the accessory socket to interface to the pc via a commercial interface lead (am not using CI-V) everything works on all the HF bands including 50Mhz
no problems but the ptt is not working on VHF/UHF have checked all the menu setting but can't find an option to enable/disable on VHF/UHF

Virus-free. www.avg.com


Re: IC7000 remote socket

Branko <9a2mw.branko@...>
 

Hello,
Connect pin 7 and pin3 for  PTT function on VHF and UHF!

VY 73
9a2mw - Branko

pet, 15. velj 2019. u 13:49 <g4efxmobile@...> napisao je:

Am using the 7000 for FT8 and using the accessory socket to interface to the pc via a commercial interface lead (am not using CI-V) everything works on all the HF bands including 50Mhz
no problems but the ptt is not working on VHF/UHF have checked all the menu setting but can't find an option to enable/disable on VHF/UHF


Re: IC7000 remote socket

Robin Williams
 

I think you have to use the 6 pin socket to get ptt on vhf/uhf 
Cheers.
Robin zl3rew

On Sat, 16 Feb 2019 01:49 <g4efxmobile@... wrote:
Am using the 7000 for FT8 and using the accessory socket to interface to the pc via a commercial interface lead (am not using CI-V) everything works on all the HF bands including 50Mhz
no problems but the ptt is not working on VHF/UHF have checked all the menu setting but can't find an option to enable/disable on VHF/UHF


IC7000 remote socket

Tony Levitt
 

Am using the 7000 for FT8 and using the accessory socket to interface to the pc via a commercial interface lead (am not using CI-V) everything works on all the HF bands including 50Mhz
no problems but the ptt is not working on VHF/UHF have checked all the menu setting but can't find an option to enable/disable on VHF/UHF


Re: Low Input Voltage in Mobile

Mark Brueggemann
 

________________________________
From: Jim Szalajeski via Groups.Io <jimszal=yahoo.com@groups.io>

there is a company that makes a device
...
It took the 24 volts and made it into the needed 12 volts.

Astron is one of them. I've also used similar converters to run negative ground equipment from positive ground heavy equipment.

<https://www.dxengineering.com/parts/asr-n2412-24>



Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM


Re: Low Input Voltage in Mobile

Jim Szalajeski
 

There are some good diode isolators on the market that are made just for applications like this.  Many are used in the marine area on the larger pleasure boats.  It is a low voltage drop device that you install between the alternator and the two batteries.  Like lift the wire from the alternator that would normally go to the original battery. Put this on one of the battery terminals on the diode isolator.  You will have to add some length of wire.  Don't cut the wire so you can remove this isolator when you go to sell your vehicle.

Run a wire from the output of your alternator where you removed the original wire and go to the common input terminal on the diode isolator.  Then run a wire from the second battery terminal on the diode isolator to your second battery.

A hint here is to use wire ring lugs for your connections.  Then you can use like a 1/4 inch short bolt and some washers to connect together the wire you removed from the alternator.  I always put just a small amount of some anti oxidant compound like Pentrox or Never Seize on the threads and connections.  This way you can get the connections apart later down the road with no problems.  This also goes to the diode connections.  You don't need a whole lot of the paste.  Just enough to get it on the threads.  Don't glob it on and make a mess.  You can use a Q Tip to put the compound where it needs to be.  Just remember a little goes a long way. 

To go to the other question, my memory is lacking me right now, but there is a company that makes a device that I used on many front end loaders to run some big Motorola radios on.  It took the 24 volts and made it into the needed 12 volts.  I am pretty sure that they also made some units that was just 12 to 12 volts.  They provide regulated voltage and come in various current selections.

Hope some of this information is of some help.

Jim




On Thursday, February 14, 2019, 6:29:15 AM CST, Mark Brueggemann via Groups.Io <qrq_cw@...> wrote:



From: Bob Rodgers <kc4tvo@...>


> I agree on diodes failing. 

What is the failure mode?  This is the first I've heard of it.  It certainly isn't due to the tepid draw of a mobile radio.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM




Anyone with experience with the ALC circuit?

 

I have an IC7000  that has problems with the ALC circuit.
The ALC voltage is about 3 volts unless USB or LSB is selected and then it drops to 0 and no output.
The ALC is pegged and no power out.
I found a bad 4.7K (R1634) resistor in the UNSB circuit (Q1606), but this made no difference.
D 1606,7,8, all have about 7 volts on the OP amp side and 0 on the ALC side when the mode is SSB.
There is no indication of a short circuit for DC with the radio off.
It seems that something is pulling the line down.
Any guesses or suggestions?


Re: Low Input Voltage in Mobile

 

I betcha that the regulator (many or most of which are in the CPU for the car or in the alternator itself) dares little if the battery is in the circuit or not.
The battery will act like a great big filter when charging, but less when topped up.
The regulator can only see the voltage for the main buss ( that the battery does connect to) and will maintain it  with or without the battery. The new regulators are pretty good and will act faster than the old relay types. 
The regulators actually control the current through the field circuit, the higher the field current the more the alternator puts out.
The regulator connect one side to the ground (not at the battery, by the way) and the main buss or very likely the actual terminal at the alternator. 
Newer cars have the regulator within the software of the CPU and it senses the voltage at the CPU.
Still it is best to not disconnect the battery as surges and spikes could easily occur especially if the battery is discharged and has a high charge rate.


Re: Low Input Voltage in Mobile

Mark Brueggemann
 

From: Richard <wile2u@gmail.com>


When you remove the battery cable, the voltage regulator looses the ability to "sense" the battery voltage,
Ah, I missed the post about "testing" by removing a battery cable. I wouldn't be too concerned about the "diodes" in the alternator but all the other connected systems subjected to the load dump. 10-18V would be a walk in the park, I believe the automotive load dump spec is upwards of 90V. So the automotive qualified systems might take it but I'm betting a connected ham radio wouldn't.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM


Re: Low Input Voltage in Mobile

Mark Schoonover
 

Rich,

Thanks for the warning on this. I've done it a couple of times on
various vehicles and didn't have an issue with it. These were on late
90 early 2000 vehicles.

73! Mark KA6WKE

Website: https://www.ka6wke.net
Live Stream: https://www.ka6wke.net/live-stream
YouTube: http://bit.ly/ka6wke-live-stream
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ka6wke
Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/ka6wke
EMail Announcement: ka6wke-announce+subscribe@groups.io
Author: 4NEC2 The Definitive Guide
EMail List:: 4nec2defguide@groups.io

On Thu, Feb 14, 2019 at 9:34 AM Richard <wile2u@gmail.com> wrote:

As it was taught to me, and 18 years of experience as a ASE Master Tech, it is the current surge and the heat that is generated that causes the rectifier diodes to fail. When you remove the battery cable, the voltage regulator looses the ability to "sense" the battery voltage, and usually sends the voltage regulator in to oscillation due to the charging circuit being having a minimal electrical load or unloaded. I have seen voltages swing from 10vdc to 18vdc very rapidly when this "test" has been done.

73,
Rich W6ABJ

On Thu, Feb 14, 2019 at 4:29 AM Mark Brueggemann via Groups.Io <qrq_cw=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:


From: Bob Rodgers <kc4tvo@oakcreekcorp.com>


I agree on diodes failing.
What is the failure mode? This is the first I've heard of it. It certainly isn't due to the tepid draw of a mobile radio.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM



Re: Low Input Voltage in Mobile

Richard
 

As it was taught to me, and 18 years of experience as a ASE Master Tech, it is the current surge and the heat that is generated that causes the rectifier diodes to fail. When you remove the battery cable, the voltage regulator looses the ability to "sense" the battery voltage, and usually sends the voltage regulator in to oscillation due to the charging circuit being having a minimal electrical load or unloaded. I have seen voltages swing from 10vdc to 18vdc very rapidly when this "test" has been done.

73, 
Rich W6ABJ 


On Thu, Feb 14, 2019 at 4:29 AM Mark Brueggemann via Groups.Io <qrq_cw=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

From: Bob Rodgers <kc4tvo@...>


> I agree on diodes failing. 

What is the failure mode?  This is the first I've heard of it.  It certainly isn't due to the tepid draw of a mobile radio.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM




Re: Low Input Voltage in Mobile

Mark Brueggemann
 

From: Bob Rodgers <kc4tvo@oakcreekcorp.com>


I agree on diodes failing.
What is the failure mode? This is the first I've heard of it. It certainly isn't due to the tepid draw of a mobile radio.


Mark K5LXP
Albuquerque, NM


Re: Low Input Voltage in Mobile

Bob Rodgers <kc4tvo@...>
 

I agree on diodes failing. 

 

I run two IC-7000s, they are designed to operate at 13.8V to output full power.  Try dropping your output power a bit and the turning itself off should go away.  I dropped mine to 50% and then worked my way back up.  I found with a good battery, I could consistently run 75+ watts! If you have to have the full 100W, then either run the engine or install a batter booster (MFJ-4416C)  They are a little pricey though.

 

For a dual battery setup, I found the West Mountain Radio ISOpwr+ to be just the ticket. It charges both batteries from the alternator, but isolates them for operation.

 

The above works for me.  YMMV.

 

Bob

KC4TVO

 

 

From: ic7000@groups.io [mailto:ic7000@groups.io] On Behalf Of Richard
Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2019 9:14 PM
To: ic7000@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ic7000] Low Input Voltage in Mobile

 

In newer vehicles that will cause the diodes to fail.

 

73, 

Rich W6ABJ

 

On Wed, Feb 13, 2019 at 5:25 PM Mark Schoonover <mark@...> wrote:

Once the vehicle is running and the output of the alternator is
greater than 12 volts, the alternator is supplying 100% of the rig's
power. Adding a second battery has no impact when the engine is
running but it does if you like to park and operate. Test it, start
your vehicle, disconnect the negative lead of the battery and your rig
& vehicle will run just fine. Now if your alternator has low output
I'd get that checked just to be sure it's good before investing in one
of those power boosters.

73! Mark KA6WKE

Website: https://www.ka6wke.net
Live Stream: https://www.ka6wke.net/live-stream
YouTube: http://bit.ly/ka6wke-live-stream
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ka6wke
Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/ka6wke
EMail Announcement: ka6wke-announce+subscribe@groups.io
Author: 4NEC2 The Definitive Guide
EMail List:: 4nec2defguide@groups.io

On Wed, Feb 13, 2019 at 4:17 PM Glenn Corrie <glenn.corrie@...> wrote:
>
> Install a dual battery system for your truck!
>
> Make sure you have a DC-DC charger too!
>
> Kind Regards
> Glenn Corrie
> Senior Product Manager
> T: +61 3 9900 9542  M: +61 414 445 597  E: glenn.corrie@...
> NEC Australia Pty Ltd: Level 9 720 Bourke St. Docklands, Victoria 3008
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: ic7000@groups.io <ic7000@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Bohacek
> Sent: Monday, 11 February 2019 6:43 AM
> To: ic7000@groups.io
> Subject: Re: [ic7000] Low Input Voltage in Mobile
>
> I did the exact same thing with the 1960 Chevy.  Installed a second battery, but connected both of them to the alternator when the car was running.  No Diode drop.  I had purchased a 100 AMP alternator from the junk yard to charge both batteries.  When the engine was off, I could use the accessory battery as much as I wanted, and still be able to start the car.  I also had a heavy duty starting relay, that I could energize connecting both batteries together to start the car on very cold mornings.  I remember it being 26 below zero in Iowa and my car was the only one that ould start.  I spent the rest of the day, giving people jump starts.
>
> On 2/10/2019 2:30 PM, r norris via Groups.Io wrote:
> > Even when you find a power conditioner, consider….
> >
> > Back in the 90’s, a couple Ford Bronco’s had room for a second battery tray, under the hood.
> > I have also done a battery in the truck bed toolbox.
> > Charge both while driving, tap the fuse block for a source that the ignition key drops a relay to disconnect the “radio” battery, when stopped.
> > There are also automatic diode wigits for not letting current flow from the “truck” battery to the radio.
> > Run the radio until the second battery dies, always start the truck and drive away.
> >
> > Been there, done it. (Don’t ask why)…….
> >
> >> On Feb 10, 2019, at 12:27, Dan Fisher AI4GK <ai4gk@...> wrote:
> >>
> >> Undoubtedly, everyone is aware of the IC-7K's dependence on input voltage. In my 2016 F-150, the computer decides how much power the alternator puts out. Gone are the days of constant 13.7 Volts. The problem is, I can't rely on the input voltage from one transmission to the next. Has anyone resolved this problem? I've been looking at a constant-voltage DC power conditioner, but can't find anything. Any ideas?
> >>
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> --
> Thank You
> Tom
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>



Re: Low Input Voltage in Mobile

Richard
 

In newer vehicles that will cause the diodes to fail.

73, 
Rich W6ABJ

On Wed, Feb 13, 2019 at 5:25 PM Mark Schoonover <mark@...> wrote:
Once the vehicle is running and the output of the alternator is
greater than 12 volts, the alternator is supplying 100% of the rig's
power. Adding a second battery has no impact when the engine is
running but it does if you like to park and operate. Test it, start
your vehicle, disconnect the negative lead of the battery and your rig
& vehicle will run just fine. Now if your alternator has low output
I'd get that checked just to be sure it's good before investing in one
of those power boosters.

73! Mark KA6WKE

Website: https://www.ka6wke.net
Live Stream: https://www.ka6wke.net/live-stream
YouTube: http://bit.ly/ka6wke-live-stream
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ka6wke
Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/ka6wke
EMail Announcement: ka6wke-announce+subscribe@groups.io
Author: 4NEC2 The Definitive Guide
EMail List:: 4nec2defguide@groups.io

On Wed, Feb 13, 2019 at 4:17 PM Glenn Corrie <glenn.corrie@...> wrote:
>
> Install a dual battery system for your truck!
>
> Make sure you have a DC-DC charger too!
>
> Kind Regards
> Glenn Corrie
> Senior Product Manager
> T: +61 3 9900 9542  M: +61 414 445 597  E: glenn.corrie@...
> NEC Australia Pty Ltd: Level 9 720 Bourke St. Docklands, Victoria 3008
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: ic7000@groups.io <ic7000@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Bohacek
> Sent: Monday, 11 February 2019 6:43 AM
> To: ic7000@groups.io
> Subject: Re: [ic7000] Low Input Voltage in Mobile
>
> I did the exact same thing with the 1960 Chevy.  Installed a second battery, but connected both of them to the alternator when the car was running.  No Diode drop.  I had purchased a 100 AMP alternator from the junk yard to charge both batteries.  When the engine was off, I could use the accessory battery as much as I wanted, and still be able to start the car.  I also had a heavy duty starting relay, that I could energize connecting both batteries together to start the car on very cold mornings.  I remember it being 26 below zero in Iowa and my car was the only one that ould start.  I spent the rest of the day, giving people jump starts.
>
> On 2/10/2019 2:30 PM, r norris via Groups.Io wrote:
> > Even when you find a power conditioner, consider….
> >
> > Back in the 90’s, a couple Ford Bronco’s had room for a second battery tray, under the hood.
> > I have also done a battery in the truck bed toolbox.
> > Charge both while driving, tap the fuse block for a source that the ignition key drops a relay to disconnect the “radio” battery, when stopped.
> > There are also automatic diode wigits for not letting current flow from the “truck” battery to the radio.
> > Run the radio until the second battery dies, always start the truck and drive away.
> >
> > Been there, done it. (Don’t ask why)…….
> >
> >> On Feb 10, 2019, at 12:27, Dan Fisher AI4GK <ai4gk@...> wrote:
> >>
> >> Undoubtedly, everyone is aware of the IC-7K's dependence on input voltage. In my 2016 F-150, the computer decides how much power the alternator puts out. Gone are the days of constant 13.7 Volts. The problem is, I can't rely on the input voltage from one transmission to the next. Has anyone resolved this problem? I've been looking at a constant-voltage DC power conditioner, but can't find anything. Any ideas?
> >>
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> --
> Thank You
> Tom
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>




Re: Low Input Voltage in Mobile

Mark Schoonover
 

Once the vehicle is running and the output of the alternator is
greater than 12 volts, the alternator is supplying 100% of the rig's
power. Adding a second battery has no impact when the engine is
running but it does if you like to park and operate. Test it, start
your vehicle, disconnect the negative lead of the battery and your rig
& vehicle will run just fine. Now if your alternator has low output
I'd get that checked just to be sure it's good before investing in one
of those power boosters.

73! Mark KA6WKE

Website: https://www.ka6wke.net
Live Stream: https://www.ka6wke.net/live-stream
YouTube: http://bit.ly/ka6wke-live-stream
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ka6wke
Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/ka6wke
EMail Announcement: ka6wke-announce+subscribe@groups.io
Author: 4NEC2 The Definitive Guide
EMail List:: 4nec2defguide@groups.io

On Wed, Feb 13, 2019 at 4:17 PM Glenn Corrie <glenn.corrie@nec.com.au> wrote:

Install a dual battery system for your truck!

Make sure you have a DC-DC charger too!

Kind Regards
Glenn Corrie
Senior Product Manager
T: +61 3 9900 9542 M: +61 414 445 597 E: glenn.corrie@nec.com.au
NEC Australia Pty Ltd: Level 9 720 Bourke St. Docklands, Victoria 3008



-----Original Message-----
From: ic7000@groups.io <ic7000@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Bohacek
Sent: Monday, 11 February 2019 6:43 AM
To: ic7000@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ic7000] Low Input Voltage in Mobile

I did the exact same thing with the 1960 Chevy. Installed a second battery, but connected both of them to the alternator when the car was running. No Diode drop. I had purchased a 100 AMP alternator from the junk yard to charge both batteries. When the engine was off, I could use the accessory battery as much as I wanted, and still be able to start the car. I also had a heavy duty starting relay, that I could energize connecting both batteries together to start the car on very cold mornings. I remember it being 26 below zero in Iowa and my car was the only one that ould start. I spent the rest of the day, giving people jump starts.

On 2/10/2019 2:30 PM, r norris via Groups.Io wrote:
Even when you find a power conditioner, consider….

Back in the 90’s, a couple Ford Bronco’s had room for a second battery tray, under the hood.
I have also done a battery in the truck bed toolbox.
Charge both while driving, tap the fuse block for a source that the ignition key drops a relay to disconnect the “radio” battery, when stopped.
There are also automatic diode wigits for not letting current flow from the “truck” battery to the radio.
Run the radio until the second battery dies, always start the truck and drive away.

Been there, done it. (Don’t ask why)…….

On Feb 10, 2019, at 12:27, Dan Fisher AI4GK <ai4gk@cfl.rr.com> wrote:

Undoubtedly, everyone is aware of the IC-7K's dependence on input voltage. In my 2016 F-150, the computer decides how much power the alternator puts out. Gone are the days of constant 13.7 Volts. The problem is, I can't rely on the input voltage from one transmission to the next. Has anyone resolved this problem? I've been looking at a constant-voltage DC power conditioner, but can't find anything. Any ideas?



--
Thank You
Tom








Re: Low Input Voltage in Mobile

Glenn Corrie
 

Install a dual battery system for your truck!

Make sure you have a DC-DC charger too!

Kind Regards
Glenn Corrie
Senior Product Manager
T: +61 3 9900 9542 M: +61 414 445 597 E: glenn.corrie@nec.com.au
NEC Australia Pty Ltd: Level 9 720 Bourke St. Docklands, Victoria 3008

-----Original Message-----
From: ic7000@groups.io <ic7000@groups.io> On Behalf Of Tom Bohacek
Sent: Monday, 11 February 2019 6:43 AM
To: ic7000@groups.io
Subject: Re: [ic7000] Low Input Voltage in Mobile

I did the exact same thing with the 1960 Chevy.  Installed a second battery, but connected both of them to the alternator when the car was running.  No Diode drop.  I had purchased a 100 AMP alternator from the junk yard to charge both batteries.  When the engine was off, I could use the accessory battery as much as I wanted, and still be able to start the car.  I also had a heavy duty starting relay, that I could energize connecting both batteries together to start the car on very cold mornings.  I remember it being 26 below zero in Iowa and my car was the only one that ould start.  I spent the rest of the day, giving people jump starts.

On 2/10/2019 2:30 PM, r norris via Groups.Io wrote:
Even when you find a power conditioner, consider….

Back in the 90’s, a couple Ford Bronco’s had room for a second battery tray, under the hood.
I have also done a battery in the truck bed toolbox.
Charge both while driving, tap the fuse block for a source that the ignition key drops a relay to disconnect the “radio” battery, when stopped.
There are also automatic diode wigits for not letting current flow from the “truck” battery to the radio.
Run the radio until the second battery dies, always start the truck and drive away.

Been there, done it. (Don’t ask why)…….

On Feb 10, 2019, at 12:27, Dan Fisher AI4GK <ai4gk@cfl.rr.com> wrote:

Undoubtedly, everyone is aware of the IC-7K's dependence on input voltage. In my 2016 F-150, the computer decides how much power the alternator puts out. Gone are the days of constant 13.7 Volts. The problem is, I can't rely on the input voltage from one transmission to the next. Has anyone resolved this problem? I've been looking at a constant-voltage DC power conditioner, but can't find anything. Any ideas?



--
Thank You
Tom

1321 - 1340 of 41398