Date   

Re: Ic 7000 problem

Chris
 

Yep check that I just can’t find a reason for it. At fist I thought RF was the caused.  But that turned out not the cause.  It’s only when you key the mike it shuts down and restarts.

Chris WB8YPO




On Sat, Mar 24, 2018 at 8:03 PM -0700, "Alex Netherton" <w5alx-groups@...> wrote:

Make absolutely sure the fuses are not corroded and there is no voltage drop at the rig. When you key, check that the voltage does not drop too much, or the rig will shut down.

-- 
73 de W5ALX
HTTP:// blue ridge discovery.org
Alex Netherton

On March 24, 2018 at 10:39:31 PM, Chris (wb8ypo@...) wrote:

I have a ic 7000 that is giving me fits. What is happening. When I transmit the radio shuts down.  I have even tried it as one radio that is not separated. Any ideas out there would be helpful.  I’m just about to send it in if I can’t get a fix.  
Chris wb8ypo


Re: Ic 7000 problem

Alex Netherton
 

Make absolutely sure the fuses are not corroded and there is no voltage drop at the rig. When you key, check that the voltage does not drop too much, or the rig will shut down.

-- 
73 de W5ALX
HTTP:// blue ridge discovery.org
Alex Netherton

On March 24, 2018 at 10:39:31 PM, Chris (wb8ypo@...) wrote:

I have a ic 7000 that is giving me fits. What is happening. When I transmit the radio shuts down.  I have even tried it as one radio that is not separated. Any ideas out there would be helpful.  I’m just about to send it in if I can’t get a fix.  
Chris wb8ypo


Ic 7000 problem

Chris
 

I have a ic 7000 that is giving me fits. What is happening. When I transmit the radio shuts down.  I have even tried it as one radio that is not separated. Any ideas out there would be helpful.  I’m just about to send it in if I can’t get a fix.  
Chris wb8ypo


Re: Radio goes deaf when changing frequencies

k4pwo <k4pwo@...>
 

First rule of weird radio behavior – Do a FULL factory reset.

 

Perry K4PWO

 

From: ic7000@groups.io <ic7000@groups.io> On Behalf Of Scott Remington
Sent: Saturday, March 24, 2018 7:39 PM
To: ic7000@groups.io
Subject: [ic7000] Radio goes deaf when changing frequencies

 

Hello All:

I've had my IC-7k for several years now and seen very little transmit time.  Mostly I use it to (try to) listen to the Shortwave Radiogram transmissions on the weekend.  A few months ago I began noticing that right after I turn the radio on and when it's cold, the receiver would go deaf when I change frequencies with the dial.  I'm not spinning the dial very fast and most of the time I'm in AM mode and anywhere from 5 MHz to 20 MHz.  Basically the background noise is reduced in level.  When this happens, I simply power cycle the radio and receive sensitivity comes back.  I got around this problem by simply turning the radio on Friday evenings to let it warm up and be ready for the weekend activities.  Lately it's gotten a LOT worse.  Tonight I could barely go more than a few kHz before sensitivity would go away.  I've also noticed that at times AM transmissions just don't sound "right".  I would switch to either LSB or USB and could tell the radio was off frequency.  Power cycling again and sideband reception sounds just like AM (well, as close as a dual sideband AM transmission could).  There's a local AM transmitter a couple miles from my home and before I could tune to the station and listen without issue.  It would be 60+ dB over but I could still receive it.  Enabling the attenuator dropped the signal strength as expected.  Tonight however, there was nothing I could do to bring that station in.  As I tuned toward it, the signal level would rise quickly and then the radio would go deaf.  If I enabled the attenuator, still deaf.  If I power cycled with the attenuator enabled, I'd get a fraction of a second of audio before it would go deaf.

Any ideas what could be going on with this thing?  This radio has had a pretty sheltered life and when it's been off, the antenna has been grounded, so I'd most likely discount any static hits.

Thanks in advance!
AA7SR


Radio goes deaf when changing frequencies

Scott Remington
 

Hello All:

I've had my IC-7k for several years now and seen very little transmit time.  Mostly I use it to (try to) listen to the Shortwave Radiogram transmissions on the weekend.  A few months ago I began noticing that right after I turn the radio on and when it's cold, the receiver would go deaf when I change frequencies with the dial.  I'm not spinning the dial very fast and most of the time I'm in AM mode and anywhere from 5 MHz to 20 MHz.  Basically the background noise is reduced in level.  When this happens, I simply power cycle the radio and receive sensitivity comes back.  I got around this problem by simply turning the radio on Friday evenings to let it warm up and be ready for the weekend activities.  Lately it's gotten a LOT worse.  Tonight I could barely go more than a few kHz before sensitivity would go away.  I've also noticed that at times AM transmissions just don't sound "right".  I would switch to either LSB or USB and could tell the radio was off frequency.  Power cycling again and sideband reception sounds just like AM (well, as close as a dual sideband AM transmission could).  There's a local AM transmitter a couple miles from my home and before I could tune to the station and listen without issue.  It would be 60+ dB over but I could still receive it.  Enabling the attenuator dropped the signal strength as expected.  Tonight however, there was nothing I could do to bring that station in.  As I tuned toward it, the signal level would rise quickly and then the radio would go deaf.  If I enabled the attenuator, still deaf.  If I power cycled with the attenuator enabled, I'd get a fraction of a second of audio before it would go deaf.

Any ideas what could be going on with this thing?  This radio has had a pretty sheltered life and when it's been off, the antenna has been grounded, so I'd most likely discount any static hits.

Thanks in advance!
AA7SR


Re: UHF FM Transmit Power

Steve W3AHL
 

I disagree that the basic adjustments are not needed.  The RD60HUF1-101 parts being shipped now have different characterisics from those produced 12 years ago.  The bias (Idle current) certainly needs to be verified, as a minimum to maintain linearity of the PA.  If power output in FM is about 17 watts at 50% TX PO setting and 35 watts at 100%, then the other settings may be OK.  I find that the new parts have more gain and cause the ALC to excessively limit the IF stage gain in SSB, resulting more distortion products seen on the analyzer.  But to each their own....

Steve, W3AHL


On Sat, Mar 24, 2018 at 08:37 am, Helmut Wabnig wrote:
On Sat, 24 Mar 2018 08:05:37 -0700, you wrote:


Replacing the UHF PA is relatively simple.  But getting to it takes a little work.  The driver board is soldered to the PA board, so it has to be unsoldered. 

No, you do NOT remove the PA board to replace the UHF transistor.
You have to remove the PA only for the driver.

Just remove two screws, unsolder the cover which is over the UHF
transistor, plug in the new one, screw&resolder the cover shield
and that's it. Takes 30 minutes.
No adjustments necessary, although it is ok to do with older IC7000
units because electrical parameters shift over time.
The adjustments are tricky and complicated,
better leave as is.
The main difficulty is to get exactly 3, 20 and 30 mVolt 1500 Hz
at the microphone input. Everything else is straightforward.
And you must provide exactly 13,8 Volt at the transceiver DC input
during transmit!

OE8UWW


Re: UHF FM Transmit Power

Helmut Wabnig
 

On Sat, 24 Mar 2018 08:05:37 -0700, you wrote:


Replacing the UHF PA is relatively simple.  But getting to it takes a little work.  The driver board is soldered to the PA board, so it has to be unsoldered. 

No, you do NOT remove the PA board to replace the UHF transistor.
You have to remove the PA only for the driver.

Just remove two screws, unsolder the cover which is over the UHF
transistor, plug in the new one, screw&resolder the cover shield
and that's it. Takes 30 minutes.
No adjustments necessary, although it is ok to do with older IC7000
units because electrical parameters shift over time.
The adjustments are tricky and complicated,
better leave as is.
The main difficulty is to get exactly 3, 20 and 30 mVolt 1500 Hz
at the microphone input. Everything else is straightforward.
And you must provide exactly 13,8 Volt at the transceiver DC input
during transmit!

OE8UWW


Re: UHF FM Transmit Power

Steve W3AHL
 

Correction:  You do NOT have to remove the PA board, unsolder the Driver pins or remove the flex cables on the 7K to replace the UHF PA. The last one I did had additional problems that required replacing other components to correct a bias issue.  The UHF PA is accessible by just removing the bottom cover.

Steve, W3AHL


On Sat, Mar 24, 2018 at 08:05 am, Steve W3AHL wrote:
On Fri, Mar 23, 2018 at 01:04 pm, <k6msm@...> wrote:
Thank you, both.  I will look into this.  Is it something I can replace with my unsteady hands or should I send to Icom?

Also, the ALC meter doesn't seem affected by changing mic gain on FM.  On 2m it's always too high (beyond the scale) and at 440 it's always 0.  Not sure if this is ok and/or related.

FYI at 100% power it only puts out 8W on 440.  I probably should dial back the RF % until I get it fixed to avoid further damage.

73,
Mike
K6MSM
The ALC meter acts differently on constant carrier modes like FM and RTTY.  A high reading on 2M is OK, being 0 on 440 means that since TX output power is too low the ALC circuit is not trying to reduce the IF gain to maintain the desired power.  

Replacing the UHF PA is relatively simple.  But getting to it takes a little work.  The driver board is soldered to the PA board, so it has to be unsoldered.  Make sure each pin wiggles before trying to remove the PA board, otherwise you may pull a plated-through hole out, which will have to be repaired.  The PA board has ribbon cables that attach it to the Main board.  Carefully pull them out and make sure the plastic stiffener on the back side remains  attached.  On older cables it often comes loose, in which case the cable should be replaced.  It centers the cable in the connector and assures the contacts are properly aligned.  

After the unit is back together you will need to do the TX Adjustments in section 4-4 of the Service Manual.  Specifically you must do:

  1. DRIVE/FINAL IDLING CURRENT -- Step 1 &11 Final Idle Current (430M)
  2. TX TOTAL GAIN -- Step 1 & 7 TX Total Gain (430M)
  3. TX OUTPUT POWER (430MHZ) -- Steps 1-5.
For all of the above, read the section 4-1 and make sure you have the required equipment for the above steps and understand what to do.  If you are unsure about doing this type of work, send the unit to an authorized Service Center, such as the one in Michigan.  

The UHF PA is sensitive to voltage spikes greater than about 35 volts peak, which are often found on a vehicle's 14 VDC battery supply, due to the starter motor counter EMF when starting the engine.  Since I started using a Littelfuse TVS (transient voltage suppressor) in my mobile RigRunner Power Pole distribution units, I have had no further UHF PA failures in over 10 years.  There is a document in the Files section that describes how to add a TVS diode to a RigRunner to clamp the power spikes to a safe level.

Steve, W3AHL


Re: UHF FM Transmit Power

Steve W3AHL
 

On Fri, Mar 23, 2018 at 01:04 pm, <k6msm@...> wrote:
Thank you, both.  I will look into this.  Is it something I can replace with my unsteady hands or should I send to Icom?

Also, the ALC meter doesn't seem affected by changing mic gain on FM.  On 2m it's always too high (beyond the scale) and at 440 it's always 0.  Not sure if this is ok and/or related.

FYI at 100% power it only puts out 8W on 440.  I probably should dial back the RF % until I get it fixed to avoid further damage.

73,
Mike
K6MSM
The ALC meter acts differently on constant carrier modes like FM and RTTY.  A high reading on 2M is OK, being 0 on 440 means that since TX output power is too low the ALC circuit is not trying to reduce the IF gain to maintain the desired power.  

Replacing the UHF PA is relatively simple.  But getting to it takes a little work.  The driver board is soldered to the PA board, so it has to be unsoldered.  Make sure each pin wiggles before trying to remove the PA board, otherwise you may pull a plated-through hole out, which will have to be repaired.  The PA board has ribbon cables that attach it to the Main board.  Carefully pull them out and make sure the plastic stiffener on the back side remains  attached.  On older cables it often comes loose, in which case the cable should be replaced.  It centers the cable in the connector and assures the contacts are properly aligned.  

After the unit is back together you will need to do the TX Adjustments in section 4-4 of the Service Manual.  Specifically you must do:

  1. DRIVE/FINAL IDLING CURRENT -- Step 1 &11 Final Idle Current (430M)
  2. TX TOTAL GAIN -- Step 1 & 7 TX Total Gain (430M)
  3. TX OUTPUT POWER (430MHZ) -- Steps 1-5.
For all of the above, read the section 4-1 and make sure you have the required equipment for the above steps and understand what to do.  If you are unsure about doing this type of work, send the unit to an authorized Service Center, such as the one in Michigan.  

The UHF PA is sensitive to voltage spikes greater than about 35 volts peak, which are often found on a vehicle's 14 VDC battery supply, due to the starter motor counter EMF when starting the engine.  Since I started using a Littelfuse TVS (transient voltage suppressor) in my mobile RigRunner Power Pole distribution units, I have had no further UHF PA failures in over 10 years.  There is a document in the Files section that describes how to add a TVS diode to a RigRunner to clamp the power spikes to a safe level.

Steve, W3AHL


Re: UHF FM Transmit Power

Helmut Wabnig
 

On Fri, 23 Mar 2018 10:54:57 -0700, you wrote:

Hello,

I have a used IC-7000 and am concerned about the UHF FM transmit power.  I think it might have a problem now that I've tested it with a watt/SWR meter.

I know that the UHF spec is lower (35W), but it takes 80% RF power to get only 5W.  At 50% RF power I get about half a watt out.  To compare, it only takes 15% to get 5W on VHF FM.  SWR is effectively 1:1 on both bands.

Is this normal or is something probably fried on the UHF side?

73,

Mike
K6MSM

I just replaced one in my 7000 and I bought them here:

https://www.ebay.at/itm/332388810809

It's an absolutely easy job, given you know how to solder.
No adjustments needed.
Yeah, and never say "SODDER", tha's nigger slang.


OE8UWW


Re: UHF FM Transmit Power

Steve Draper
 

I can add that the UHF final is at least one of the easier ones to swap out in the 7000.

Steve VE7FM

On Fri, Mar 23, 2018, 12:39 Paul Hansen <pwhansen@...> wrote:

The 7000 uses separate finals for HF, VHF and UHF but the same driver. I you get full power output on HF and  VHF, I bet the UHF PA is gone. It’s an RD60HUF-1 and they go bad for some reason.

 

Thank you,

 

Paul W. Hansen, W6XA

 

 

From: ic7000@groups.io [mailto:ic7000@groups.io] On Behalf Of k6msm@...
Sent: March 23, 2018 17:55
To: ic7000@groups.io
Subject: [ic7000] UHF FM Transmit Power

 

Hello,

I have a used IC-7000 and am concerned about the UHF FM transmit power.  I think it might have a problem now that I've tested it with a watt/SWR meter.

I know that the UHF spec is lower (35W), but it takes 80% RF power to get only 5W.  At 50% RF power I get about half a watt out.  To compare, it only takes 15% to get 5W on VHF FM  SWR is effectively 1:1 on both bands.

Is this normal or is something probably fried on the UHF side?

73,

Mike
K6MSM


Re: UHF FM Transmit Power

k6msm@...
 

Thank you, both.  I will look into this.  Is it something I can replace with my unsteady hands or should I send to Icom?

Also, the ALC meter doesn't seem affected by changing mic gain on FM.  On 2m it's always too high (beyond the scale) and at 440 it's always 0.  Not sure if this is ok and/or related.

FYI at 100% power it only puts out 8W on 440.  I probably should dial back the RF % until I get it fixed to avoid further damage.

73,
Mike
K6MSM


Re: Hex command to play stored voice message #1 over the air?

WA8Y Steven
 

Don't think you can but you can always press F1-F4 manually.

N3FJP can play sound files.  Record and save your audio files, then navigate to each sound file from N3FJP.  Sorry I cannot be more specific because I don't have the N3FJP logger open in front of me.  But it has a voice keyer memory just like it has a CW Memory Keyer.
Steve WA8Y 



On Thu, Mar 22, 2018, 7:24 PM Robert Snell <rob@...> wrote:

Hi all,

I am trying to figure out the command to send from N3JFP (logger) to play the message stored in slot #1. Hoping to figure this out before the WPX contest this weekend. The instructions given in N3JFP don't work with the changed address that I know is correct.

Cheers,

Rob KQ3Q


Re: UHF FM Transmit Power

Paul Hansen
 

The 7000 uses separate finals for HF, VHF and UHF but the same driver. I you get full power output on HF and  VHF, I bet the UHF PA is gone. It’s an RD60HUF-1 and they go bad for some reason.

 

Thank you,

 

Paul W. Hansen, W6XA

 

 

From: ic7000@groups.io [mailto:ic7000@groups.io] On Behalf Of k6msm@...
Sent: March 23, 2018 17:55
To: ic7000@groups.io
Subject: [ic7000] UHF FM Transmit Power

 

Hello,

I have a used IC-7000 and am concerned about the UHF FM transmit power.  I think it might have a problem now that I've tested it with a watt/SWR meter.

I know that the UHF spec is lower (35W), but it takes 80% RF power to get only 5W.  At 50% RF power I get about half a watt out.  To compare, it only takes 15% to get 5W on VHF FM  SWR is effectively 1:1 on both bands.

Is this normal or is something probably fried on the UHF side?

73,

Mike
K6MSM


Re: UHF FM Transmit Power

Steve Draper
 

99% chance the UHF final needs to be replaced. Last time I needed one rfparts.com had them in stock.

Steve VE7FM

On Fri, Mar 23, 2018, 12:08 <k6msm@...> wrote:
Hello,

I have a used IC-7000 and am concerned about the UHF FM transmit power.  I think it might have a problem now that I've tested it with a watt/SWR meter.

I know that the UHF spec is lower (35W), but it takes 80% RF power to get only 5W.  At 50% RF power I get about half a watt out.  To compare, it only takes 15% to get 5W on VHF FM.  SWR is effectively 1:1 on both bands.

Is this normal or is something probably fried on the UHF side?

73,

Mike
K6MSM


UHF FM Transmit Power

k6msm@...
 

Hello,

I have a used IC-7000 and am concerned about the UHF FM transmit power.  I think it might have a problem now that I've tested it with a watt/SWR meter.

I know that the UHF spec is lower (35W), but it takes 80% RF power to get only 5W.  At 50% RF power I get about half a watt out.  To compare, it only takes 15% to get 5W on VHF FM.  SWR is effectively 1:1 on both bands.

Is this normal or is something probably fried on the UHF side?

73,

Mike
K6MSM


Hex command to play stored voice message #1 over the air?

Robert Snell
 

Hi all,

I am trying to figure out the command to send from N3JFP (logger) to play the message stored in slot #1. Hoping to figure this out before the WPX contest this weekend. The instructions given in N3JFP don't work with the changed address that I know is correct.

Cheers,

Rob KQ3Q


my call

JAMES DAVIDSON <jijvd74@...>
 

kc0dd  drakesville iowa


Re: 440 Band Off Frequency

Kenneth W. Campbell <n6pcd@...>
 

Hi Steve,

Thanks for a the reply, I'm finding this group to be a treasure trove of great information! I'll give the procedure you outlined here a try and report back to the group my results.

73/DX de Ken N6PCD


Re: 440 Band Off Frequency

Steve W3AHL
 

The Reference Oscillator is subject to frequency drift due to several causes, which result in the need to recalibrate it using the OTHER menu #51 adjustment.  I would try that before sending it in for repair.  While the oscillator is specified to have +/- 0.5 ppm frequency stability, that is only the short term stability with reference to gradual termperature change.  The long term aging is specified at +/- 1 ppm/year.  The oscillator frequency is voltage controlled via a D/A converter on the CPU, which its datasheet does not fully specify long term drift characteristics but probably exceeds 1 ppm.  I have seen units needing adjustment that be in the range of about 2 KHz shift on 440 MHz, but seemed to remain within spec afterwards.

I tend to recalibrate my 7K's Ref Osc about once a year.  Allow the unit to warm up with power on in the typical ambient operating environment for at least 30 minutes.  Then zero beat to the highest WWV frequency you can receive or calibrate as others mentioned to another reference signal (but not in FM mode, since the frequency accuracy will not be adequate for other modes).   Recheck the calibration occasionally to verify it is reasonably accurate still.  If not, there may be a problem with X1 on the DDS board or some other part.  I've never personnally known any of the loca hams to have to repair a 7K due to frequency drift that couldn't be adjusted with the menu 51 calibration (there's a reason it's there!), but VCO's can certainly fail, as can the DDS IC's and their controlling register chips.

Steve, W3AHL

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