Even MORE capital region priority blocks that need Atlasing


zach schwartz-weinstein
 

Thanks for that information, Scott.  Maybe it will be possible to negotiate access to these areas next spring.  But Inman Pond is on public land, as is the Pilot Knob Gazebo.


On Fri, Jul 9, 2021 at 2:50 PM Scott Varney <scottvarney1968@...> wrote:
Just for the record, Crossett Pond and the Three Ponds are entirely private access only.  I will speak with the Camp Ranger at Camp Wakpominee about any possible admittance to the Three Ponds...highly unlikely, as their youth camp season is in full swing and doesnt finish until the end of August. 

Scott Varney
Salem, NY

On Fri, Jul 9, 2021, 11:54 AM zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw@...> wrote:
Due to popular demand, here are some other atlas blocks no one has visited yet.  These three blocks are in Washington County, and they aren't the only unvisited blocks in Washington County, but all three have some public lands that makes them easier to atlas than some of the other unbirded blocks in the region.

Granville CE - No visits.  Multiple cemeteries, an airport, and several ponds should make for a good diversity of habitats and species.  

West Pawlet CE - This block hosts the Pember Nature Preserve and a lot of riparian habitat along Black Creek, as well as farmland.  It hasn't been atlassed at all.  

Putnam Mountain NW - This block, near the eastern shore of Lake George, hosts Inman Pond and the trail to it from Sly Pond Road.  The Inman Pond trail also continues to the far end of the block and crosses into the adjoining non-priority block, and could be useful for covering a fairly large section of the block.  The south end of Crossett Pond is in-block, as are the Three Ponds (though I'm not sure how these are accessed.)  So is the Pilot Knob Gazebo (but not Pilot Knob itself.)

As noted above, there are many more unvisited blocks in Warren, Washington, and Fulton Counties, as well as in Greene and Schoharie counties, and even more blocks that only have a few hours logged and few if any species confirmed.  I will continue to highlight some of these blocks as fledgling season continues.  I'm happy to report that the merlin nest i have been monitoring all spring in Albany has three nestlings who have spent the last few days working their way down the branches of the tree where the nest is, and it looks like they'll fledge any day now if they haven't already done so today.
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Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774



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Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


Scott Varney
 

Just for the record, Crossett Pond and the Three Ponds are entirely private access only.  I will speak with the Camp Ranger at Camp Wakpominee about any possible admittance to the Three Ponds...highly unlikely, as their youth camp season is in full swing and doesnt finish until the end of August. 

Scott Varney
Salem, NY

On Fri, Jul 9, 2021, 11:54 AM zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw@...> wrote:
Due to popular demand, here are some other atlas blocks no one has visited yet.  These three blocks are in Washington County, and they aren't the only unvisited blocks in Washington County, but all three have some public lands that makes them easier to atlas than some of the other unbirded blocks in the region.

Granville CE - No visits.  Multiple cemeteries, an airport, and several ponds should make for a good diversity of habitats and species.  

West Pawlet CE - This block hosts the Pember Nature Preserve and a lot of riparian habitat along Black Creek, as well as farmland.  It hasn't been atlassed at all.  

Putnam Mountain NW - This block, near the eastern shore of Lake George, hosts Inman Pond and the trail to it from Sly Pond Road.  The Inman Pond trail also continues to the far end of the block and crosses into the adjoining non-priority block, and could be useful for covering a fairly large section of the block.  The south end of Crossett Pond is in-block, as are the Three Ponds (though I'm not sure how these are accessed.)  So is the Pilot Knob Gazebo (but not Pilot Knob itself.)

As noted above, there are many more unvisited blocks in Warren, Washington, and Fulton Counties, as well as in Greene and Schoharie counties, and even more blocks that only have a few hours logged and few if any species confirmed.  I will continue to highlight some of these blocks as fledgling season continues.  I'm happy to report that the merlin nest i have been monitoring all spring in Albany has three nestlings who have spent the last few days working their way down the branches of the tree where the nest is, and it looks like they'll fledge any day now if they haven't already done so today.
--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


zach schwartz-weinstein
 

Due to popular demand, here are some other atlas blocks no one has visited yet.  These three blocks are in Washington County, and they aren't the only unvisited blocks in Washington County, but all three have some public lands that makes them easier to atlas than some of the other unbirded blocks in the region.

Granville CE - No visits.  Multiple cemeteries, an airport, and several ponds should make for a good diversity of habitats and species.  

West Pawlet CE - This block hosts the Pember Nature Preserve and a lot of riparian habitat along Black Creek, as well as farmland.  It hasn't been atlassed at all.  

Putnam Mountain NW - This block, near the eastern shore of Lake George, hosts Inman Pond and the trail to it from Sly Pond Road.  The Inman Pond trail also continues to the far end of the block and crosses into the adjoining non-priority block, and could be useful for covering a fairly large section of the block.  The south end of Crossett Pond is in-block, as are the Three Ponds (though I'm not sure how these are accessed.)  So is the Pilot Knob Gazebo (but not Pilot Knob itself.)

As noted above, there are many more unvisited blocks in Warren, Washington, and Fulton Counties, as well as in Greene and Schoharie counties, and even more blocks that only have a few hours logged and few if any species confirmed.  I will continue to highlight some of these blocks as fledgling season continues.  I'm happy to report that the merlin nest i have been monitoring all spring in Albany has three nestlings who have spent the last few days working their way down the branches of the tree where the nest is, and it looks like they'll fledge any day now if they haven't already done so today.
--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774