Date   

Snowy Owl - Albany

Richard Guthrie
 

There was one on the radar antenna on the USS Slater at about 11:30 this morning. Sorry for the delayed report.

Rich Guthrie


Re: Large accipiter at Vischer Ferry

Naomi Lloyd
 

Field marks I didn't know to look for...

Naomi


On Thursday, January 2, 2020, 5:53:13 PM EST, zach schwartz-weinstein <zachsw@...> wrote:


At this time of year, a goshawk at VF isn’t that out of the question.  Did you get a glimpse of tjrnUndertail coverts?  They‘re unstreaked on cooper’s but not on Goshawk.  Goshawks show buffy scaling on the upper shoulders, Cooper’s do not.  Gos would also look relatively small-headed in comparison with a Coop

On Thu, Jan 2, 2020 at 5:48 PM Naomi Lloyd via Groups.Io <naomi_kestrel=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Not to go all Nelson Briefer on you, but I'd like to hear thoughts on the likelihood of a Northern Goshawk at Vischer Ferry. I saw the bird twice-- first in flight away from me maybe 10 feet off the ground. First impression was a LARGE female Coop, pretty uniformly gray on the back, but with no terminal band on the tail. In a few seconds I didn't have time to notice darkness of the head. About 3:20, shaded by trees, light not good.

About 25 minutes later I saw what I think was the same bird perched in a cottonwood. Size and posture (a bit "slumped") almost made me think Red-tailed at first until I got on the very long tail, gray back, pale chest and white eyebrow. When it took off the fanned tail was narrowly banded and looked even in length. No reddish tone to the breast.

Opinions? For now it's going into eBird as Acc sp with the description above. If I'd seen it at Cherry Plain I'd feel more secure in my ID but VF just seems an unlikely place.

(It did not at any time rip through the sky)

Naomi Lloyd



--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


Re: Large accipiter at Vischer Ferry

zach schwartz-weinstein
 

At this time of year, a goshawk at VF isn’t that out of the question.  Did you get a glimpse of tjrnUndertail coverts?  They‘re unstreaked on cooper’s but not on Goshawk.  Goshawks show buffy scaling on the upper shoulders, Cooper’s do not.  Gos would also look relatively small-headed in comparison with a Coop

On Thu, Jan 2, 2020 at 5:48 PM Naomi Lloyd via Groups.Io <naomi_kestrel=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Not to go all Nelson Briefer on you, but I'd like to hear thoughts on the likelihood of a Northern Goshawk at Vischer Ferry. I saw the bird twice-- first in flight away from me maybe 10 feet off the ground. First impression was a LARGE female Coop, pretty uniformly gray on the back, but with no terminal band on the tail. In a few seconds I didn't have time to notice darkness of the head. About 3:20, shaded by trees, light not good.

About 25 minutes later I saw what I think was the same bird perched in a cottonwood. Size and posture (a bit "slumped") almost made me think Red-tailed at first until I got on the very long tail, gray back, pale chest and white eyebrow. When it took off the fanned tail was narrowly banded and looked even in length. No reddish tone to the breast.

Opinions? For now it's going into eBird as Acc sp with the description above. If I'd seen it at Cherry Plain I'd feel more secure in my ID but VF just seems an unlikely place.

(It did not at any time rip through the sky)

Naomi Lloyd



--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


Large accipiter at Vischer Ferry

Naomi Lloyd
 

Not to go all Nelson Briefer on you, but I'd like to hear thoughts on the likelihood of a Northern Goshawk at Vischer Ferry. I saw the bird twice-- first in flight away from me maybe 10 feet off the ground. First impression was a LARGE female Coop, pretty uniformly gray on the back, but with no terminal band on the tail. In a few seconds I didn't have time to notice darkness of the head. About 3:20, shaded by trees, light not good.

About 25 minutes later I saw what I think was the same bird perched in a cottonwood. Size and posture (a bit "slumped") almost made me think Red-tailed at first until I got on the very long tail, gray back, pale chest and white eyebrow. When it took off the fanned tail was narrowly banded and looked even in length. No reddish tone to the breast.

Opinions? For now it's going into eBird as Acc sp with the description above. If I'd seen it at Cherry Plain I'd feel more secure in my ID but VF just seems an unlikely place.

(It did not at any time rip through the sky)

Naomi Lloyd


HMBC Program and holiday party - Monday January 6 - COLONIE LIBRARY

scottjstoner
 

I wish everyone a Happy New Year - good birding in 2020!

Hope to see you Monday night - NOTE THE NEW TIME AND LOCATION !!!

Monday January 6: :Program at 6:30 PM Aerial Insectivorous Birds, with Joe Corra of Capital Region Audubon, this evening will also include the Holiday Party (rescheduled from December). Feel free to arrive as early as 6:00 PM and bring a dessert to share. Alcoholic beverages are NOT allowed at the Library.

Scott Stoner, Program Chair, Hudson-Mohawk Bird Club


Re: Posting for ID help - MIssissippi Kite?

John Loz
 

Thanks to everyone who responded and viewed this email.
I also thought it was a leucistic Red-tailed Hawk, but wanted to get the community to help confirm.
Much obliged and Happy New Year to all!
John

On Monday, December 30, 2019, 5:04:28 PM EST, John Loz via Groups.Io <stellersjayjohn@...> wrote:


Hello HMBird Friends,

I'm posting a picture of a bird with this email, that was sent to me by a fellow HMBirds follower and rehabber. She said she has not been able to post pictures using her HMBirds account, so hoping that I can for her here!

She shared with me a picture from a friend of hers of a white-ish bird seen in the vicinity of Farm-to-Market Road and Smith Road within the last day. She and a couple other birders thought that it could be a Mississippi Kite, but would like some help with ID and if anyone went out to that road intersection to look for it, confirm that it is still there.

Also, a note about birds that find their way into our area from one of our known rehabbers. If you do see a bird that does look unhealthy or is in trouble, especially a bird that might be way out of it's regular range, please don't hesitate to call a rehabber to come out and assess the situation. Our local rehabbers want to help a bird that needs assistance and release it back into the wild in the appropriate habitat of course!

Thanks everyone!
John Loz





Canvasback, American Pipit, no field birds. eBird Report - Northumberland farmland, Jan 1, 2020

Ronald Harrower
 


Northumberland farmland, Saratoga, New York, US
Jan 1, 2020 11:35 AM - 2:15 PM
Protocol: Traveling
22.0 mile(s)
Checklist Comments: Once again, I choose to do a travelogue of a larger area with highlights of specific spots of birds observed. John and I started our Northumberland tour in Bacon Hill and went up River Rd. Easily 150 American Crows in large fields beyond Welcome Farm. There were other spots where crows were plentiful. There was one Common Raven on Harris Road, which was our next stop. Except for two Common Mergansers, the ducks were all Common Goldeneyes, flying to different spots and riding the river rapids downs and going back up again. There was a Carolina wren in the bushes near the shore.
It was significant that we had no filed birds, despite hitting all the favored spots in Northumberland. So Callahan Rd, Williams Lane, King Rd, Wall Rd, Purinton Rd, Austin Rd, Goff Rd all were devoid of field birds, with the field bird kid, John H on the case no less!
We hit an active spot on Kobor Rd. There were at least 8 Eastern Bluebirds, 2 American Golfinches, numerous Juncos, and a few Chickadees and WB Nuthatches. We enjoyed watching the Bluebirds eating the sumac berries. This dead end part of Kobor also had over 100 American Crows.
We zigzagged on Peters Rd and up and down Purinton and Austin Rd. We are about to give up when we spotted a small raft of Mallards on the Hudson 1/2 mile North of Purinton Rd. Also in the area were many Common Goldeneyes and a few Common Mergansers. I was checking out what at a distance seems to be more Goldeneyes when I saw the deep chestnut head and pure white body of a male Canvasback. I got some iffy photos before going back to get John's attention. Unfortunately, they flew off before he could see it, and despite our best efforts, we couldn't relocate it. I did have a single American Pipit fly over my head and it was calling.
Cold and lack of field birds, brought and end to the day's adventure. Hopefully more snow and more manure will bring the field birds back.
20 species

Canada Goose 14
Mallard 34
Canvasback 1 Male. Unmistakeable, hanging out with Common Goldeneyes. I am making a guess that it might be the same drake that was on Saratoga Lake up until it froze on December 20, 2019. Can'y t prove it without banding or other means, but it is unusual to have just one and The Hudson is a logical place for it to go after Saratoga Lake freezes. I did go up and down River Rd 3 weeks ago and there were no diving ducks then. Now, there are lots of Common Goldeneyes, Common Mergansers, and this Canvasback. All were on Saratoga Lake until it froze. There are also lots of Goldeneyes in Stillwater as well.
Common Goldeneye 28
Common Merganser 4
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 56
Mourning Dove 2
Belted Kingfisher 1
Downy Woodpecker 1
Blue Jay 4
American Crow 345
Common Raven 1
Black-capped Chickadee 2
White-breasted Nuthatch 2
Carolina Wren 1
European Starling 112
Eastern Bluebird 16 We 8 on Kobor, 4 on the Williams Lane and 4 on River Rd
American Pipit 1 Call was distinctive as was size, coloring and shape.
American Goldfinch 2
Dark-eyed Junco 14

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S62892911

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)


Greater White-fronted Goose, Cossayuna

Scott Varney
 

Did a long drive on this wind-chilled day (January 1st, 2020) and found a bunch of birds...finally!  The Greater White-fronted Goose is still hanging out on the outlet of Cossayuna Lake and got great looks today. It flew off honking loudly and then circled back to the same open water on the outlet. Magnificent!

Then in the Washington County Grasslands, my sister and I found a male Northern Harrier followed immediately by a female of the same species. In an area near The Stovery in Argyle, we came across a flock of Robins that numbered at least 75 birds in 3-4 trees. Immediately adjacent to those trees, we found a single tree that held at least 45 Cedar Waxwings...but could not pinpoint a single, hopeful Bohemian Waxwing. At least a dozen Red-tailed Hawks were encountered in our travels. A very cool non-avian sighting was a lone Red Fox that walked from one side to the other on Cossayuna Lake, at the widest point and right behind 2 ice fishermen who had no idea what we were looking at!  If they turned 180 degrees, the fox would have been 20 feet from them!

Amazing 1st Day,

Scott Varney
Salem NY


Ulster/Dutches (NYUD) Christmas Bird Count 12/28/19 overview

forsythnature
 

Greetings All,
  The ninth annual Ulster/Dutchess (NYUD) Christmas Bird Count was conducted on Saturday, December 28th.  Conditions were favorable with temperatures ranging from a low of 30 degrees during pre-dawn owling to a very comfortable, sun-filled 47 degrees midday.  There was absolutely no breeze throughout the day which did keep a veil of fog in locations along the river making viewing difficult until late morning.   Black ice was reported in most sectors and the snow cover that was present had a slippery crust making early birding a bit treacherous.  The Hudson River was open and mirror like while her main tributaries in the circle ran freely.   Smaller bodies of water were frozen with shaded and protected areas still holding on to an inch or two of several week old snow.

  45 birders in 13 field parties, plus two feeder watchers covered the circle’s ten sectors.  These birders observed 79 species totaling 14,731 individual birds.  The species total represented our second lowest ( 78 in 2013) and the individual count was the third lowest we’ve tallied.  After nine years, the NYUD composite list stands at 128 species with no new additions this year. Through nine years we have averaged 85 species and 17,470 individuals on count day.  Only one count week species was observed with an Eastern Phoebe on the Bard College Campus.

  Highlights of this year’s count included Long-eared Owl, Blue-winged Teal, and Rusty Blackbirds in the Annandale-On-Hudson sector, Gray Catbird and Eastern Towhee in the West Saugerties sector, Northern Saw-whet Owl in the Kerley’s Corners sector, Purple Finches in the Rhinebeck sector, and a House Wren in the Kingston sector.  An exciting phenomenon may have truly been the highlight of the day with to my recollection of Ulster-centered CBC’s, a first with three different sectors observing Red-headed Woodpeckers (2 in the West Saugerties sector, 2 in the Woodstock sector, and 1 in the Rhinebeck sector).   Another unique occurrence were the 42 individual owls counted in five sectors with Kerley’s Corners leading the way with 16 birds and Annandale-On-Hudson with 14 birds.

  Thirteen species set high counts this year including  Red-bellied Woodpecker (54 seen in the Cheviot sector alone),  4 Common Loons and 12 of the 22 Swamp Sparrows observed in the Lake Katrine sector, and 160 Carolina Wrens (previous high was 102).  Six species set new low counts this year including typically abundant species like Black-capped Chickadee, Tufted Titmouse, and Dark-eyed Junco.  American Crow numbers this year were a alarming quarter of their 1279 in 2016. 

  Thank you again this year to Steve Chorvas for his data input and spreadsheet wizardry and to all those NYUDers who brought food, attended, and helped with clean-up of our post count compilation in Kingston.

  SAVE THE DATE FOR THE 10TH ANNUAL ULSTER/DUTCHESS(NYUD)CBC: SATURDAY, DECEMBER 26 2020

Wishing All a Healthy and Bird-filled New Year,
Mark DeDea
NYUD co-compiler


This week's destination: 1/2/20

Naomi Lloyd
 

Happy New Year and new year list! did everyone stay up to watch your eBird list clear at midnight?

Let's meet at Tibbits Ave in Green Island at 9:00 and check the ice shelves along the Mohawk. Ron had an Iceland Gull yesterday. Bring your scope if you have one.

Naomi





Iceland Gull. eBird Report - Crescent Park, Dec 31, 2019

Ronald Harrower
 

Crescent Park, Saratoga, New York, US
Dec 31, 2019 12:42 PM - 12:56 PM
Protocol: Traveling
0.5 mile(s)
Checklist Comments: I drove down the river from Klamsteam Tavern to the Crescent Bridge. The shallow water was frozen. A small group of Common Mergs were near the little marina about halfway down. The next birds I saw were a bunch of Great Black-backed Gulls floating down the river, some riding little ice chunks like royalty. Therein group of gulls were near the Crescent Park proper. The "highlight" was an Iceland Gull. There was a mix of Black-backed, Herring and Ring-billed hanging out on the edge of the ice, taking off once when I first got out of the car, but they settled down.
7 species (+1 other taxa)

Common Merganser 9
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) 7
Mourning Dove 2
Ring-billed Gull 25
Herring Gull 19
Iceland Gull 1
Great Black-backed Gull 29
gull sp. 14 I have difficulty figuring out years and plumages of gulls.

View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/checklist/S62826251

This report was generated automatically by eBird v3 (https://ebird.org/home)


Re: Christmas Bird Count Online Map

Tristan Lowery
 

I haven't used the Count Circle app but if you're cheap (as I am), you can just look up count circle center coordinates at the Audubon CBC map and then punch them into a circle-generating site like this one: https://www.fcc.gov/media/radio/circleplot. Then download the resulting KML file, which can then be opened in applications like Google My Maps and saved for mobile viewing in the field on Google Maps.

Tristan Lowery
Albany

On Tue, Dec 31, 2019 at 7:26 PM Naomi Lloyd via Groups.Io <naomi_kestrel=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
If you want to maximise your participation in CBCs, NYSOA does a list of all the NY state counts every year. If you like travelling, it was possible to do 11 this year!

https://nybirds.org/ProjCBC.htm

Naomi Lloyd
a slacker with only 6 this year.


On Tuesday, December 31, 2019, 6:18:45 PM EST, Cassandra Davis <daviscass33@...> wrote:


Hi All,

At one of the previous CBC compilations, there was interest in seeing a map of all the CBC areas in NY. I was curious too and I found an interactive map of all the active Christmas Bird Count Circles. 

Link: https://arcg.is/1LjG44 

Best,
Cassie


Re: Christmas Bird Count Online Map

Naomi Lloyd
 

If you want to maximise your participation in CBCs, NYSOA does a list of all the NY state counts every year. If you like travelling, it was possible to do 11 this year!

https://nybirds.org/ProjCBC.htm

Naomi Lloyd
a slacker with only 6 this year.


On Tuesday, December 31, 2019, 6:18:45 PM EST, Cassandra Davis <daviscass33@...> wrote:


Hi All,

At one of the previous CBC compilations, there was interest in seeing a map of all the CBC areas in NY. I was curious too and I found an interactive map of all the active Christmas Bird Count Circles. 

Link: https://arcg.is/1LjG44 

Best,
Cassie


Re: Christmas Bird Count Online Map

Stacy Robinson
 

There is also a handy little app available for CBC use. It's called Count Circle and shows you where you are located within any CBC circle. We used it while we were just out birding and found count week and count day birds in nearby circles we didn't personally participate in. I really appreciated knowing where I was within the circle boundaries while I was out Owling in the dark. I believe it cost $2.99 to download from the app store.

Stacy Robinson
Port Henry, NY


Christmas Bird Count Online Map

Cassandra Davis
 

Hi All,

At one of the previous CBC compilations, there was interest in seeing a map of all the CBC areas in NY. I was curious too and I found an interactive map of all the active Christmas Bird Count Circles. 

Link: https://arcg.is/1LjG44 

Best,
Cassie


NY Breeding Bird Atlas III begins tomorrow!

zach schwartz-weinstein
 

Hi All,

The third New York State Breeding Bird Atlas is nearly upon us–it officially starts on January 1, 2020! We hope that you will join thousands of other birders in documenting the state's breeding species over the next five years! 

Working together with the Atlas Steering Committee, Atlas Project Coordinator Julie Hart, and a team of regional coordinators, I will be coordinating Atlas activities in Albany, Schoharie, Greene, Fulton, Montgomery, Schenectady, Warren, Rensselaer, Washington, and Saratoga Counties.

Our area is home to a wonderful and distinct group of breeding birds, but it is also a vast region, so if you ever watch birds in our area, we will need your help! We encourage birders of all backgrounds, from new birders to experienced Atlasers, to help document the breeding birds of our region.

The New York Breeding Bird Atlas III website (https://ebird.org/atlasny/about) contains a lot of great information about the Atlas, and we encourage you to explore the many resources on the site. As the breeding season of many species starts later in the spring, there will be Atlas training workshops and other opportunities to learn more about Atlas goals and how atlasing works. If you're eager to get started right away in January, here are a few key points:

All of the data entry for the project will be via a dedicated eBird portal for New York Breeding Bird Atlas III. eBird offers real-time data entry and outputs, so you’ll be able to follow along with results throughout the breeding season and across the entire project period.

For this Atlas, New York State has been divided into 5,710 blocks, each roughly 3 miles by 3 miles in size. From these 5,710 blocks covering the entire state, the Atlas Team has selected a subset of *priority blocks* that are evenly distributed across the state to ensure broad coverage. To complete the Atlas, we need to adequately survey all of the priority blocks, which make up 1/3 of all Atlas blocks. Priority blocks contain many popular birding spots and great breeding habitats in our region, and are where the focus should be. But if your backyard or favorite birding destination does not fall within a priority block, you are encouraged to submit your breeding observations for those areas, too.

This map (https://lab.nynhp.org/bba/) allows you to search for priority blocks near you and download detailed block maps. This is also where you will be able to sign up for blocks starting January 1, 2020. Anybody can atlas in any Atlas block, so it is not necessary to sign up for a block. But if you are especially interested in atlasing in a certain block, signing up for that block is a great way to indicate your interest in documenting the breeding birds in that block.

Although the Atlas starts on January 1, only a very small number of species in our region might be demonstrating signs of breeding behavior in January. These species are Great Horned Owl and Red Crossbill.  This great chart (https://s3.amazonaws.com/is-ebird-wordpress-prod-s3/wp-content/uploads/sites/79/2019/11/Breeding-Guideline-Chart.pdf) provides very detailed information about when species are breeding in New York. In general, breeding codes should only be used for a species if the species is in the "E" or "B" portion of its breeding calendar.

We realize that for some of you, either atlasing or using eBird will be new for you, but don't worry–there are lots of resources to help you learn more! The Atlas III website is a great place to start, and then we will be scheduling community training workshops in the coming months. In the meantime, if you have any questions, please feel free to contact us at zachsw@...

Good Atlasing,
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein

--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774


HMBC Field Trip reminder- Wed., Jan. 1st

trwdsd
 

Wednesday, January 1, NEW YEAR’S DAY BIRD COUNT AT FIVE RIVERS EEC (Albany County; morning)

Coordinators: Five Rivers EEC 518-475-0291 (daytime)

Five Rivers Environmental Education Center, located on Game Farm Rd., in Delmar, NY, is a large area of fields and forest and is one of the premier birding locations in the Capital District.

This year marks the 38th Annual New Year’s Day Bird Count at Five Rivers. The goal of the count is to identify all the bird species present on January 1st. This also marks the start of Five Rivers’ annual bird list. HMBC joins the event again this year and encourages members to participate. Groups will go out at 9:00 a.m., but birders are welcome to come earlier to get a head start. Everyone will meet up at the Visitors Center for a compilation of species-observed at 11:00 a.m.

Call ahead to Five Rivers in case of inclement weather.

Meet at 8:45 a.m. at Five Rivers EEC in Delmar.

map:  https://hmbc.net/event-3673849


Tom Williams
Colonie


Awareness - Site Fidelity

Richard Guthrie
 

There's lots of knowledge out there about site fidelity among birds - same individuals returning each spring for nesting, and identifiable individuals returning to the same wintering grounds.

There are some notable examples, such as an individual of a particularly rare species that returned each year. From around our area, there are these: Lesser Black-backed Gull, Iceland Gull, Barrow's Goldeneye, Eared Grebe, and so on.

Bird banders know that from returning birds banded years earlier.

The reason I bring this up here is that we can anticipate similar visitors.

The Pink-footed Goose comes to mind.

Naomi Lloyd found the one in Columbia County a couple of years ago. Then one (ok here's the stretch - maybe the same one ! ?) appeared right across the river in The Greene County last year.

So are there others?

Sure there are...

Do you know of a particular, individually identifiable bird, that has returned to your yard, patch, beach, park, etc. ?

Let me know by sharing the info - privately for now..

I hope to put together a compilation - with appropriate acknowledgments, in a upcoming edition of Kingbird, the birding journal of the NYS Ornithological Association.

Let's keep the page turners at the edge of their seats by sharing your information to me directly rather than putting it out piecemeal on line.

Of particular interest are also those nesting, slightly out of range, long distant migrants, such as returning Orchard Oriole, as well as the better known (or not) examples as mentioned.


Fun-on, Folks
--
Richard Guthrie
New Baltimore,
The Greene County,
NY


Re: Posting for ID help - MIssissippi Kite?

kernscot
 

Looks like a leucistic Red-tailed Hawk. Definitely not a Mississippi Kite.

Nancy Kern
Austerlitz, NY



From: hmbirds@groups.io <hmbirds@groups.io> on behalf of John Loz via Groups.Io <stellersjayjohn@...>
Sent: Monday, December 30, 2019 5:04 PM
To: HMBirds <hmbirds@groups.io>
Cc: hmbirds@groups.io <hmbirds@groups.io>
Subject: [hmbirds] Posting for ID help - MIssissippi Kite?
 
Hello HMBird Friends,

I'm posting a picture of a bird with this email, that was sent to me by a fellow HMBirds follower and rehabber. She said she has not been able to post pictures using her HMBirds account, so hoping that I can for her here!

She shared with me a picture from a friend of hers of a white-ish bird seen in the vicinity of Farm-to-Market Road and Smith Road within the last day. She and a couple other birders thought that it could be a Mississippi Kite, but would like some help with ID and if anyone went out to that road intersection to look for it, confirm that it is still there.

Also, a note about birds that find their way into our area from one of our known rehabbers. If you do see a bird that does look unhealthy or is in trouble, especially a bird that might be way out of it's regular range, please don't hesitate to call a rehabber to come out and assess the situation. Our local rehabbers want to help a bird that needs assistance and release it back into the wild in the appropriate habitat of course!

Thanks everyone!
John Loz





Re: Posting for ID help - MIssissippi Kite?

zach schwartz-weinstein
 

Looks better for a Leucistic Red-Tailed Hawk to me.  The wings are too short for a MIKI.

On Mon, Dec 30, 2019 at 5:04 PM John Loz via Groups.Io <stellersjayjohn=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hello HMBird Friends,

I'm posting a picture of a bird with this email, that was sent to me by a fellow HMBirds follower and rehabber. She said she has not been able to post pictures using her HMBirds account, so hoping that I can for her here!

She shared with me a picture from a friend of hers of a white-ish bird seen in the vicinity of Farm-to-Market Road and Smith Road within the last day. She and a couple other birders thought that it could be a Mississippi Kite, but would like some help with ID and if anyone went out to that road intersection to look for it, confirm that it is still there.

Also, a note about birds that find their way into our area from one of our known rehabbers. If you do see a bird that does look unhealthy or is in trouble, especially a bird that might be way out of it's regular range, please don't hesitate to call a rehabber to come out and assess the situation. Our local rehabbers want to help a bird that needs assistance and release it back into the wild in the appropriate habitat of course!

Thanks everyone!
John Loz




--
Zach Schwartz-Weinstein
203 500 7774

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